• This short introduction to category theory is for readers with relatively little mathematical background. At its heart is the concept of a universal property, important throughout mathematics. After a chapter introducing the basic definitions, separate chapters present three ways of expressing universal properties: via adjoint functors, representable functors, and limits. A final chapter ties the three together. For each new categorical concept, a generous supply of examples is provided, taken from different parts of mathematics. At points where the leap in abstraction is particularly great (such as the Yoneda lemma), the reader will find careful and extensive explanations.
  • Diversity measurement underpins the study of biological systems, but measures used vary across disciplines. Despite their common use and broad utility, no unified framework has emerged for measuring, comparing and partitioning diversity. The introduction of information theory into diversity measurement has laid the foundations, but the framework is incomplete without the ability to partition diversity, which is central to fundamental questions across the life sciences: How do we prioritise communities for conservation? How do we identify reservoirs and sources of pathogenic organisms? How do we measure ecological disturbance arising from climate change? The lack of a common framework means that diversity measures from different fields have conflicting fundamental properties, allowing conclusions reached to depend on the measure chosen. This conflict is unnecessary and unhelpful. A mathematically consistent framework would transform disparate fields by delivering scientific insights in a common language. It would also allow the transfer of theoretical and practical developments between fields. We meet this need, providing a versatile unified framework for partitioning biological diversity. It encompasses any kind of similarity between individuals, from functional to genetic, allowing comparisons between qualitatively different kinds of diversity. Where existing partitioning measures aggregate information across the whole population, our approach permits the direct comparison of subcommunities, allowing us to pinpoint distinct, diverse or representative subcommunities and investigate population substructure. The framework is provided as a ready-to-use R package to easily test our approach.
  • Magnitude is a numerical isometric invariant of metric spaces, whose definition arises from a precise analogy between categories and metric spaces. Despite this exotic provenance, magnitude turns out to encode many invariants from integral geometry and geometric measure theory, including volume, capacity, dimension, and intrinsic volumes. This paper will give an overview of the theory of magnitude, from its category-theoretic genesis to its connections with these geometric quantities.
  • There is a general notion of the magnitude of an enriched category, defined subject to hypotheses. In topological and geometric contexts, magnitude is already known to be closely related to classical invariants such as Euler characteristic and dimension. Here we establish its significance in an algebraic context. Specifically, in the representation theory of an associative algebra A, a central role is played by the indecomposable projective A-modules, which form a category enriched in vector spaces. We show that the magnitude of that category is a known homological invariant of the algebra: writing chi_A for the Euler form of A and S for the direct sum of the simple A-modules, it is chi_A(S, S).
  • Entropy, under a variety of names, has long been used as a measure of diversity in ecology, as well as in genetics, economics and other fields. There is a spectrum of viewpoints on diversity, indexed by a real parameter q giving greater or lesser importance to rare species. Leinster and Cobbold proposed a one-parameter family of diversity measures taking into account both this variation and the varying similarities between species. Because of this latter feature, diversity is not maximized by the uniform distribution on species. So it is natural to ask: which distributions maximize diversity, and what is its maximum value? In principle, both answers depend on q, but our main theorem is that neither does. Thus, there is a single distribution that maximizes diversity from all viewpoints simultaneously, and any list of species has an unambiguous maximum diversity value. Furthermore, the maximizing distribution(s) can be computed in finite time, and any distribution maximizing diversity from some particular viewpoint q > 0 actually maximizes diversity for all q. Although we phrase our results in ecological terms, they apply very widely, with applications in graph theory and metric geometry.
  • We show that there are infinitely many distinct closed classes of colimits (in the sense of the Galois connection induced by commutation of limits and colimits in Set) which are intermediate between the class of pseudo-filtered colimits and that of all (small) colimits. On the other hand, if the corresponding class of limits contains either pullbacks or equalizers, then the class of colimits is contained in that of pseudo-filtered colimits.
  • The magnitude of a graph is one of a family of cardinality-like invariants extending across mathematics; it is a cousin to Euler characteristic and geometric measure. Among its cardinality-like properties are multiplicativity with respect to cartesian product and an inclusion-exclusion formula for the magnitude of a union. Formally, the magnitude of a graph is both a rational function over Q and a power series over Z. It shares features with one of the most important of all graph invariants, the Tutte polynomial; for instance, magnitude is invariant under Whitney twists when the points of identification are adjacent. Nevertheless, the magnitude of a graph is not determined by its Tutte polynomial, nor even by its cycle matroid, and it therefore carries information that they do not.
  • For modules over a finite-dimensional algebra, there is a canonical one-to-one correspondence between the projective indecomposable modules and the simple modules. In this purely expository note, we take a straight-line path from the definitions to this correspondence. The proof is self-contained.
  • Even a functor without an adjoint induces a monad, namely, its codensity monad; this is subject only to the existence of certain limits. We clarify the sense in which codensity monads act as substitutes for monads induced by adjunctions. We also expand on an undeservedly ignored theorem of Kennison and Gildenhuys: that the codensity monad of the inclusion of (finite sets) into (sets) is the ultrafilter monad. This result is analogous to the correspondence between measures and integrals. So, for example, we can speak of integration against an ultrafilter. Using this language, we show that the codensity monad of the inclusion of (finite-dimensional vector spaces) into (vector spaces) is double dualization. From this it follows that compact Hausdorff spaces have a linear analogue: linearly compact vector spaces. Finally, we show that ultraproducts are categorically inevitable: the codensity monad of the inclusion of (finite families of sets) into (families of sets) is the ultraproduct monad.
  • Higher categorical structures are often defined by induction on dimension, which a priori produces only finite-dimensional structures. In this paper we show how to extend such definitions to infinite dimensions using the theory of terminal coalgebras, and we apply this method to Trimble's notion of weak n-category. Trimble's definition makes explicit the relationship between n-categories and topological spaces; our extended theory produces a definition of Trimble infinity-category and a fundamental infinity-groupoid construction. Furthermore, terminal coalgebras are often constructed as limits of a certain type. We prove that the theory of Batanin-Leinster weak infinity-categories arises as just such a limit, justifying our approach to Trimble infinity-categories. In fact we work at the level of monads for infinity-categories, rather than infinity-categories themselves; this requires more sophisticated technology but also provides a more complete theory of the structures in question.
  • Rethinking set theory (1212.6543)

    Dec. 28, 2012 math.CT, math.LO
    Mathematicians manipulate sets with confidence almost every day, rarely making mistakes. Few of us, however, could accurately quote what are often referred to as "the" axioms of set theory. This suggests that we all carry around with us, perhaps subconsciously, a reliable body of operating principles for manipulating sets. What if we were to take some of those principles and adopt them as our axioms instead? The message of this article is that this can be done, in a simple, practical way (due to Lawvere). The resulting axioms are ten thoroughly mundane statements about sets. This is an expository article for a general mathematical readership.
  • M\"obius inversion, originally a tool in number theory, was generalized to posets for use in group theory and combinatorics. It was later generalized to categories in two different ways, both of which are useful. We provide a unifying abstract framework. This allows us to compare and contrast the two theories of M\"obius inversion for categories, and advance each of them. Among several side benefits is an improved understanding of the following fact: the Euler characteristic of the classifying space of a (suitably finite) category depends only on its underlying graph.
  • Magnitude is a canonical invariant of finite metric spaces which has its origins in category theory; it is analogous to cardinality of finite sets. Here, by approximating certain compact subsets of Euclidean space with finite subsets, the magnitudes of line segments, circles and Cantor sets are defined and calculated. It is observed that asymptotically these satisfy the inclusion-exclusion principle, relating them to intrinsic volumes of polyconvex sets.
  • Classical integral geometry takes place in Euclidean space, but one can attempt to imitate it in any other metric space. In particular, one can attempt this in R^n equipped with the metric derived from the p-norm. This has, in effect, been investigated intensively for 1<p<\infty, but not for p=1. We show that integral geometry for the 1-norm bears a striking resemblance to integral geometry for the 2-norm, but is radically different from that for all other values of p. We prove a Hadwiger-type theorem for R^n with the 1-norm, and analogues of the classical formulas of Steiner, Crofton and Kubota. We also prove principal and higher kinematic formulas. Each of these results is closely analogous to its Euclidean counterpart, yet the proofs are quite different.
  • There are numerous characterizations of Shannon entropy and Tsallis entropy as measures of information obeying certain properties. Using work by Faddeev and Furuichi, we derive a very simple characterization. Instead of focusing on the entropy of a probability measure on a finite set, this characterization focuses on the `information loss', or change in entropy, associated with a measure-preserving function. Information loss is a special case of conditional entropy: namely, it is the entropy of a random variable conditioned on some function of that variable. We show that Shannon entropy gives the only concept of information loss that is functorial, convex-linear and continuous. This characterization naturally generalizes to Tsallis entropy as well.
  • This short expository text is for readers who are confident in basic category theory but know little or nothing about toposes. It is based on some impromptu talks given to a small group of category theorists.
  • A startlingly simple characterization of the p-norms has recently been found by Aubrun and Nechita (arXiv:1102.2618) and by Fernandez-Gonzalez, Palazuelos and Perez-Garcia. We deduce a simple characterization of the power means of order greater than or equal to 1.
  • Magnitude is a real-valued invariant of metric spaces, analogous to the Euler characteristic of topological spaces and the cardinality of sets. The definition of magnitude is a special case of a general categorical definition that clarifies the analogies between various cardinality-like invariants in mathematics. Although this motivation is a world away from geometric measure, magnitude, when applied to subsets of R^n, turns out to be intimately related to invariants such as volume, surface area, perimeter and dimension. We describe several aspects of this relationship, providing evidence for a conjecture (first stated in arXiv:0908.1582) that magnitude subsumes all the most important invariants of classical integral geometry.
  • This is a preliminary article stating and proving a new maximum entropy theorem. The entropies that we consider can be used as measures of biodiversity. In that context, the question is: for a given collection of species, which frequency distribution(s) maximize the diversity? The theorem provides the answer. The chief surprise is that although we are dealing with not just a single entropy, but a one-parameter family of entropies, there is a single distribution maximizing all of them simultaneously.
  • A little-known and highly economical characterization of the real interval [0, 1], essentially due to Freyd, states that the interval is homeomorphic to two copies of itself glued end to end, and, in a precise sense, is universal as such. Other familiar spaces have similar universal properties; for example, the topological simplices Delta^n may be defined as the universal family of spaces admitting barycentric subdivision. We develop a general theory of such universal characterizations. This can also be regarded as a categorification of the theory of simultaneous linear equations. We study systems of equations in which the variables represent spaces and each space is equated to a gluing-together of the others. One seeks the universal family of spaces satisfying the equations. We answer all the basic questions about such systems, giving an explicit condition equivalent to the existence of a universal solution, and an explicit construction of it whenever it does exist.
  • We show that Thompson's group F is the symmetry group of the "generic idempotent". That is, take the monoidal category freely generated by an object A and an isomorphism A \otimes A --> A; then F is the group of automorphisms of A.
  • The Euler characteristic of a cell complex is often thought of as the alternating sum of the number of cells of each dimension. When the complex is infinite, the sum diverges. Nevertheless, it can sometimes be evaluated; in particular, this is possible when the complex is the nerve of a finite category. This provides an alternative definition of the Euler characteristic of a category, which is in many cases equivalent to the original one (math.CT/0610260).
  • The Euler characteristic of a finite category is defined and shown to be compatible with Euler characteristics of other types of object, including orbifolds. A formula for the cardinality of the colimit of a diagram of sets is proved, generalizing the classical inclusion-exclusion formula. Both rest on a generalization of Mobius-Rota inversion from posets to categories.
  • Consider a self-similar space X. A typical situation is that X looks like several copies of itself glued to several copies of another space Y, and Y looks like several copies of itself glued to several copies of X, or the same kind of thing with more than two spaces. Thus, the self-similarity of X is described by a system of simultaneous equations. Here I formalize this idea and the notion of a `universal solution' of such a system. I determine exactly when a system has a universal solution and, when one does exist, construct it. A sequel (math.DS/0411345) contains further results and examples, and an introductory article (math.DS/0411343) gives an overview.
  • This paper concerns the self-similarity of topological spaces, in the sense defined in math.DS/0411344. I show how to recognize self-similar spaces, or more precisely, universal solutions of self-similarity systems. Examples include the standard simplices (self-similar by barycentric subdivision) and solutions of iterated function systems. Perhaps surprisingly, every compact metrizable space is self-similar in at least one way. From this follow the classical results on the role of the Cantor set among compact metrizable spaces.