• A seed in a word is a relaxed version of a period in which the occurrences of the repeating subword may overlap. We show a linear-time algorithm computing a linear-size representation of all the seeds of a word (the number of seeds might be quadratic). In particular, one can easily derive the shortest seed and the number of seeds from our representation. Thus, we solve an open problem stated in the survey by Smyth (2000) and improve upon a previous O(n log n) algorithm by Iliopoulos, Moore, and Park (1996). Our approach is based on combinatorial relations between seeds and subword complexity (used here for the first time in context of seeds). In the previous papers, the compact representation of seeds consisted of two independent parts operating on the suffix tree of the word and the suffix tree of the reverse of the word, respectively. Our second contribution is a simpler representation of all seeds which avoids dealing with the reversed word. A preliminary version of this work, with a much more complex algorithm constructing the earlier representation of seeds, was presented at the 23rd Annual ACM-SIAM Symposium of Discrete Algorithms (SODA 2012).
  • A border of a string is a non-empty prefix of the string that is also a suffix of the string, and a string is unbordered if it has no border other than itself. Loptev, Kucherov, and Starikovskaya [CPM 2015] conjectured the following: If we pick a string of length $n$ from a fixed non-unary alphabet uniformly at random, then the expected maximum length of its unbordered factors is $n - O(1)$. We confirm this conjecture by proving that the expected value is, in fact, ${n - \Theta(\sigma^{-1})}$, where $\sigma$ is the size of the alphabet. This immediately implies that we can find such a maximal unbordered factor in linear time on average. However, we go further and show that the optimum average-case running time is in $\Omega (\sqrt{n}) \cap O (\sqrt{n \log_\sigma n})$ due to analogous bounds by Czumaj and G\k{a}sieniec [CPM 2000] for the problem of computing the shortest period of a uniformly random string.
  • We consider the Abelian longest common factor problem in two scenarios: when input strings are uncompressed and are of size $n$, and when the input strings are run-length encoded and their compressed representations have size at most $m$. The alphabet size is denoted by $\sigma$. For the uncompressed problem, we show an $o(n^2)$-time and $\Oh(n)$-space algorithm in the case of $\sigma=\Oh(1)$, making a non-trivial use of tabulation. For the RLE-compressed problem, we show two algorithms: one working in $\Oh(m^2\sigma^2 \log^3 m)$ time and $\Oh(m (\sigma^2+\log^2 m))$ space, which employs line sweep, and one that works in $\Oh(m^3)$ time and $\Oh(m)$ space that applies in a careful way a sliding-window-based approach. The latter improves upon the previously known $\Oh(nm^2)$-time and $\Oh(m^4)$-time algorithms that were recently developed by Sugimoto et al.\ (IWOCA 2017) and Grabowski (SPIRE 2017), respectively.
  • We consider the streaming complexity of a fundamental task in approximate pattern matching: the $k$-mismatch problem. It asks to compute Hamming distances between a pattern of length $n$ and all length-$n$ substrings of a text for which the Hamming distance does not exceed a given threshold $k$. In our problem formulation, we report not only the Hamming distance but also, on demand, the full \emph{mismatch information}, that is the list of mismatched pairs of symbols and their indices. The twin challenges of streaming pattern matching derive from the need both to achieve small working space and also to guarantee that every arriving input symbol is processed quickly. We present a streaming algorithm for the $k$-mismatch problem which uses $O(k\log{n}\log\frac{n}{k})$ bits of space and spends \ourcomplexity time on each symbol of the input stream, which consists of the pattern followed by the text. The running time almost matches the classic offline solution and the space usage is within a logarithmic factor of optimal. Our new algorithm therefore effectively resolves and also extends an open problem first posed in FOCS'09. En route to this solution, we also give a deterministic $O( k (\log \frac{n}{k} + \log |\Sigma|) )$-bit encoding of all the alignments with Hamming distance at most $k$ of a length-$n$ pattern within a text of length $O(n)$. This secondary result provides an optimal solution to a natural communication complexity problem which may be of independent interest.
  • In the Longest Common Factor with $k$ Mismatches (LCF$_k$) problem, we are given two strings $X$ and $Y$ of total length $n$, and we are asked to find a pair of maximal-length factors, one of $X$ and the other of $Y$, such that their Hamming distance is at most $k$. Thankachan et al. show that this problem can be solved in $\mathcal{O}(n \log^k n)$ time and $\mathcal{O}(n)$ space for constant $k$. We consider the LCF$_k$($\ell$) problem in which we assume that the sought factors have length at least $\ell$, and the LCF$_k$($\ell$) problem for $\ell=\Omega(\log^{2k+2} n)$, which we call the Long LCF$_k$ problem. We use difference covers to reduce the Long LCF$_k$ problem to a task involving $m=\mathcal{O}(n/\log^{k+1}n)$ synchronized factors. The latter can be solved in $\mathcal{O}(m \log^{k+1}m)$ time, which results in a linear-time algorithm for Long LCF$_k$. In general, our solution to LCF$_k$($\ell$) for arbitrary $\ell$ takes $\mathcal{O}(n + n \log^{k+1} n/\sqrt{\ell})$ time.
  • The order-preserving model (op-model, in short) was introduced quite recently but has already attracted significant attention because of its applications in data analysis. We introduce several types of periods in this setting (op-periods). Then we give algorithms to compute these periods in time $O(n)$, $O(n\log\log n)$, $O(n \log^2 \log n/\log \log \log n)$, $O(n\log n)$ depending on the type of periodicity. In the most general variant the number of different periods can be as big as $\Omega(n^2)$, and a compact representation is needed. Our algorithms require novel combinatorial insight into the properties of such periods.
  • We investigate the function $L(h,p,q)$, called here the threshold function, related to periodicity of partial words (words with holes). The value $L(h,p,q)$ is defined as the minimum length threshold which guarantees that a natural extension of the periodicity lemma is valid for partial words with $h$ holes and (strong) periods $p,q$. We show how to evaluate the threshold function in $O(\log p + \log q)$ time, which is an improvement upon the best previously known $O(p+q)$-time algorithm. In a series of papers, the formulae for the threshold function, in terms of $p$ and $q$, were provided for each fixed $h \le 7$. We demystify the generic structure of such formulae, and for each value $h$ we express the threshold function in terms of a piecewise-linear function with $O(h)$ pieces.
  • In the longest common substring problem we are given two strings of length $n$ and must find a substring of maximal length that occurs in both strings. It is well-known that the problem can be solved in linear time, but the solution is not robust and can vary greatly when the input strings are changed even by one letter. To circumvent this, Leimeister and Morgenstern introduced the problem of the longest common substring with $k$ mismatches. Lately, this problem has received a lot of attention in the literature. In this paper we first show a conditional lower bound based on the SETH hypothesis implying that there is little hope to improve existing solutions. We then introduce a new but closely related problem of the longest common substring with approximately $k$ mismatches and use computational geometry techniques to show that it admits a solution with strongly subquadratic running time. We also apply these results to obtain a strongly subquadratic approximation algorithm for the longest common substring with $k$ mismatches problem and show conditional hardness of improving its approximation ratio.
  • In a \emph{weighted sequence}, for every position of the sequence and every letter of the alphabet a probability of occurrence of this letter at this position is specified. Weighted sequences are commonly used to represent imprecise or uncertain data, for example, in molecular biology where they are known under the name of Position-Weight Matrices. Given a probability threshold $\frac1z$, we say that a string $P$ of length $m$ occurs in a weighted sequence $X$ at position $i$ if the product of probabilities of the letters of $P$ at positions $i,\ldots,i+m-1$ in $X$ is at least $\frac1z$. In this article, we consider an \emph{indexing} variant of the problem, in which we are to preprocess a weighted sequence to answer multiple pattern matching queries. We present an $O(nz)$-time construction of an $O(nz)$-sized index for a weighted sequence of length $n$ over a constant-sized alphabet that answers pattern matching queries in optimal, $O(m+Occ)$ time, where $Occ$ is the number of occurrences reported. The cornerstone of our data structure is a novel construction of a family of $\lfloor z \rfloor$ special strings that carries the information about all the strings that occur in the weighted sequence with a sufficient probability. We obtain a weighted index with the same complexities as in the most efficient previously known index by Barton et al. (CPM 2016), but our construction is significantly simpler. The most complex algorithmic tool required in the basic form of our index is the suffix tree which we use to develop a new, more straightforward index for the so-called property matching problem. We provide an implementation of our data structure. Our construction allows us also to obtain a significant improvement over the complexities of the approximate variant of the weighted index presented by Biswas et al. (EDBT 2016) and an improvement of the space complexity of their general index.
  • We investigate two closely related LZ78-based compression schemes: LZMW (an old scheme by Miller and Wegman) and LZD (a recent variant by Goto et al.). Both LZD and LZMW naturally produce a grammar for a string of length $n$; we show that the size of this grammar can be larger than the size of the smallest grammar by a factor $\Omega(n^{\frac{1}3})$ but is always within a factor $O((\frac{n}{\log n})^{\frac{2}{3}})$. In addition, we show that the standard algorithms using $\Theta(z)$ working space to construct the LZD and LZMW parsings, where $z$ is the size of the parsing, work in $\Omega(n^{\frac{5}4})$ time in the worst case. We then describe a new Las Vegas LZD/LZMW parsing algorithm that uses $O (z \log n)$ space and $O(n + z \log^2 n)$ time w.h.p..
  • We show that a problem of deleting a minimum number of vertices from a graph to obtain a graph embeddable on a surface of a given Euler genus is solvable in time $2^{C_g \cdot k^2 \log k} n^{O(1)}$, where $k$ is the size of the deletion set, $C_g$ is a constant depending on the Euler genus $g$ of the target surface, and $n$ is the size of the input graph. On the way to this result, we develop an algorithm solving the problem in question in time $2^{O((t+g) \log (t+g))} n$, given a tree decomposition of the input graph of width $t$. The results generalize previous algorithms for the surface being a sphere by Marx and Schlotter [Algorithmica 2012], Kawarabayashi [FOCS 2009], and Jansen, Lokshtanov, and Saurabh [SODA 2014].
  • Strip packing is a classical packing problem, where the goal is to pack a set of rectangular objects into a strip of a given width, while minimizing the total height of the packing. The problem has multiple applications, e.g. in scheduling and stock-cutting, and has been studied extensively. When the dimensions of objects are allowed to be exponential in the total input size, it is known that the problem cannot be approximated within a factor better than $3/2$, unless $\mathrm{P}=\mathrm{NP}$. However, there was no corresponding lower bound for polynomially bounded input data. In fact, Nadiradze and Wiese [SODA 2016] have recently proposed a $(1.4 + \epsilon)$ approximation algorithm for this variant, thus showing that strip packing with polynomially bounded data can be approximated better than when exponentially large values in the input data are allowed. Their result has subsequently been improved to a $(4/3 + \epsilon)$ approximation by two independent research groups [FSTTCS 2016, arXiv:1610.04430]. This raises a question whether strip packing with polynomially bounded input data admits a quasi-polynomial time approximation scheme, as is the case for related two-dimensional packing problems like maximum independent set of rectangles or two-dimensional knapsack. In this paper we answer this question in negative by proving that it is NP-hard to approximate strip packing within a factor better than $12/11$, even when admitting only polynomially bounded input data. In particular, this shows that the strip packing problem admits no quasi-polynomial time approximation scheme, unless $\mathrm{NP} \subseteq \mathrm{DTIME}(2^{\mathrm{polylog}(n)})$.
  • Suffix tree (and the closely related suffix array) are fundamental structures capturing all substrings of a given text essentially by storing all its suffixes in the lexicographical order. In some applications, we work with a subset of $b$ interesting suffixes, which are stored in the so-called sparse suffix tree. Because the size of this structure is $\Theta(b)$, it is natural to seek a construction algorithm using only $O(b)$ words of space assuming read-only random access to the text. We design a linear-time Monte Carlo algorithm for this problem, hence resolving an open question explicitly stated by Bille et al. [TALG 2016]. The best previously known algorithm by I et al. [STACS 2014] works in $O(n\log b)$ time. Our solution proceeds in $n/b$ rounds; in the $r$-th round, we consider all suffixes starting at positions congruent to $r$ modulo $n/b$. By maintaining rolling hashes, we lexicographically sort all interesting suffixes starting at such positions, and then we merge them with the already considered suffixes. For efficient merging, we also need to answer LCE queries in small space. By plugging in the structure of Bille et al. [CPM 2015] we obtain $O(n+b\log b)$ time complexity. We improve this structure, which implies a linear-time sparse suffix tree construction algorithm. We complement our Monte Carlo algorithm with a deterministic verification procedure. The verification takes $O(n\sqrt{\log b})$ time, which improves upon the bound of $O(n\log b)$ obtained by I et al. [STACS 2014]. This is obtained by first observing that the pruning done inside the previous solution has a rather clean description using the notion of graph spanners with small multiplicative stretch. Then, we are able to decrease the verification time by applying difference covers twice. Combined with the Monte Carlo algorithm, this gives us an $O(n\sqrt{\log b})$-time and $O(b)$-space Las Vegas algorithm.
  • We study pattern matching problems on two major representations of uncertain sequences used in molecular biology: weighted sequences (also known as position weight matrices, PWM) and profiles (i.e., scoring matrices). In the simple version, in which only the pattern or only the text is uncertain, we obtain efficient algorithms with theoretically-provable running times using a variation of the lookahead scoring technique. We also consider a general variant of the pattern matching problems in which both the pattern and the text are uncertain. Central to our solution is a special case where the sequences have equal length, called the consensus problem. We propose algorithms for the consensus problem parameterized by the number of strings that match one of the sequences. As our basic approach, a careful adaptation of the classic meet-in-the-middle algorithm for the knapsack problem is used. On the lower bound side, we prove that our dependence on the parameter is optimal up to lower-order terms conditioned on the optimality of the original algorithm for the knapsack problem.
  • Longest common extension queries (LCE queries) and runs are ubiquitous in algorithmic stringology. Linear-time algorithms computing runs and preprocessing for constant-time LCE queries have been known for over a decade. However, these algorithms assume a linearly-sortable integer alphabet. A recent breakthrough paper by Bannai et.\ al.\ (SODA 2015) showed a link between the two notions: all the runs in a string can be computed via a linear number of LCE queries. The first to consider these problems over a general ordered alphabet was Kosolobov (\emph{Inf.\ Process.\ Lett.}, 2016), who presented an $O(n (\log n)^{2/3})$-time algorithm for answering $O(n)$ LCE queries. This result was improved by Gawrychowski et.\ al.\ (accepted to CPM 2016) to $O(n \log \log n)$ time. In this work we note a special \emph{non-crossing} property of LCE queries asked in the runs computation. We show that any $n$ such non-crossing queries can be answered on-line in $O(n \alpha(n))$ time, which yields an $O(n \alpha(n))$-time algorithm for computing runs.
  • The combinatorics of squares in a word depends on how the equivalence of halves of the square is defined. We consider Abelian squares, parameterized squares, and order-preserving squares. The word $uv$ is an Abelian (parameterized, order-preserving) square if $u$ and $v$ are equivalent in the Abelian (parameterized, order-preserving) sense. The maximum number of ordinary squares in a word is known to be asymptotically linear, but the exact bound is still investigated. We present several results on the maximum number of distinct squares for nonstandard subword equivalence relations. Let $\mathit{SQ}_{\mathrm{Abel}}(n,\sigma)$ and $\mathit{SQ}'_{\mathrm{Abel}}(n,\sigma)$ denote the maximum number of Abelian squares in a word of length $n$ over an alphabet of size $\sigma$, which are distinct as words and which are nonequivalent in the Abelian sense, respectively. For $\sigma\ge 2$ we prove that $\mathit{SQ}_{\mathrm{Abel}}(n,\sigma)=\Theta(n^2)$, $\mathit{SQ}'_{\mathrm{Abel}}(n,\sigma)=\Omega(n^{3/2})$ and $\mathit{SQ}'_{\mathrm{Abel}}(n,\sigma) = O(n^{11/6})$. We also give linear bounds for parameterized and order-preserving squares for alphabets of constant size: $\mathit{SQ}_{\mathrm{param}}(n,O(1))=\Theta(n)$, $\mathit{SQ}_{\mathrm{op}}(n,O(1))=\Theta(n)$. The upper bounds have quadratic dependence on the alphabet size for order-preserving squares and exponential dependence for parameterized squares. As a side result we construct infinite words over the smallest alphabet which avoid nontrivial order-preserving squares and nontrivial parameterized cubes (nontrivial parameterized squares cannot be avoided in an infinite word).
  • In this paper we study the fundamental problem of maintaining a dynamic collection of strings under the following operations: concat - concatenates two strings, split - splits a string into two at a given position, compare - finds the lexicographical order (less, equal, greater) between two strings, LCP - calculates the longest common prefix of two strings. We present an efficient data structure for this problem, where an update requires only $O(\log n)$ worst-case time with high probability, with $n$ being the total length of all strings in the collection, and a query takes constant worst-case time. On the lower bound side, we prove that even if the only possible query is checking equality of two strings, either updates or queries take amortized $\Omega(\log n)$ time; hence our implementation is optimal. Such operations can be used as a basic building block to solve other string problems. We provide two examples. First, we can augment our data structure to provide pattern matching queries that may locate occurrences of a specified pattern $p$ in the strings in our collection in optimal $O(|p|)$ time, at the expense of increasing update time to $O(\log^2 n)$. Second, we show how to maintain a history of an edited text, processing updates in $O(\log t \log \log t)$ time, where $t$ is the number of edits, and how to support pattern matching queries against the whole history in $O(|p| \log t \log \log t)$ time. Finally, we note that our data structure can be applied to test dynamic tree isomorphism and to compare strings generated by dynamic straight-line grammars.
  • Longest common extension queries (often called longest common prefix queries) constitute a fundamental building block in multiple string algorithms, for example computing runs and approximate pattern matching. We show that a sequence of $q$ LCE queries for a string of size $n$ over a general ordered alphabet can be realized in $O(q \log \log n+n\log^*n)$ time making only $O(q+n)$ symbol comparisons. Consequently, all runs in a string over a general ordered alphabet can be computed in $O(n \log \log n)$ time making $O(n)$ symbol comparisons. Our results improve upon a solution by Kosolobov (Information Processing Letters, 2016), who gave an algorithm with $O(n \log^{2/3} n)$ running time and conjectured that $O(n)$ time is possible. We make a significant progress towards resolving this conjecture. Our techniques extend to the case of general unordered alphabets, when the time increases to $O(q\log n + n\log^*n)$. The main tools are difference covers and the disjoint-sets data structure.
  • The problem of finding factors of a text string which are identical or similar to a given pattern string is a central problem in computer science. A generalised version of this problem consists in implementing an index over the text to support efficient on-line pattern queries. We study this problem in the case where the text is weighted: for every position of the text and every letter of the alphabet a probability of occurrence of this letter at this position is given. Sequences of this type, also called position weight matrices, are commonly used to represent imprecise or uncertain data. A weighted sequence may represent many different strings, each with probability of occurrence equal to the product of probabilities of its letters at subsequent positions. Given a probability threshold $1/z$, we say that a pattern string $P$ matches a weighted text at position $i$ if the product of probabilities of the letters of $P$ at positions $i,\ldots,i+|P|-1$ in the text is at least $1/z$. In this article, we present an $O(nz)$-time construction of an $O(nz)$-sized index that can answer pattern matching queries in a weighted text in optimal time improving upon the state of the art by a factor of $z \log z$. Other applications of this data structure include an $O(nz)$-time construction of the weighted prefix table and an $O(nz)$-time computation of all covers of a weighted sequence, which improve upon the state of the art by the same factor.
  • For a text given in advance, the substring minimal suffix queries ask to determine the lexicographically minimal non-empty suffix of a substring specified by the location of its occurrence in the text. We develop a data structure answering such queries optimally: in constant time after linear-time preprocessing. This improves upon the results of Babenko et al. (CPM 2014), whose trade-off solution is characterized by $\Theta(n\log n)$ product of these time complexities. Next, we extend our queries to support concatenations of $O(1)$ substrings, for which the construction and query time is preserved. We apply these generalized queries to compute lexicographically minimal and maximal rotations of a given substring in constant time after linear-time preprocessing. Our data structures mainly rely on properties of Lyndon words and Lyndon factorizations. We combine them with further algorithmic and combinatorial tools, such as fusion trees and the notion of order isomorphism of strings.
  • Given a word $w$ and a Parikh vector $\mathcal{P}$, an abelian run of period $\mathcal{P}$ in $w$ is a maximal occurrence of a substring of $w$ having abelian period $\mathcal{P}$. Our main result is an online algorithm that, given a word $w$ of length $n$ over an alphabet of cardinality $\sigma$ and a Parikh vector $\mathcal{P}$, returns all the abelian runs of period $\mathcal{P}$ in $w$ in time $O(n)$ and space $O(\sigma+p)$, where $p$ is the norm of $\mathcal{P}$, i.e., the sum of its components. We also present an online algorithm that computes all the abelian runs with periods of norm $p$ in $w$ in time $O(np)$, for any given norm $p$. Finally, we give an $O(n^2)$-time offline randomized algorithm for computing all the abelian runs of $w$. Its deterministic counterpart runs in $O(n^2\log\sigma)$ time.
  • We study a variation of the classical Shortest Common Superstring (SCS) problem in which a shortest superstring of a finite set of strings $S$ is sought containing as a factor every string of $S$ or its reversal. We call this problem Shortest Common Superstring with Reversals (SCS-R). This problem has been introduced by Jiang et al., who designed a greedy-like algorithm with length approximation ratio $4$. In this paper, we show that a natural adaptation of the classical greedy algorithm for SCS has (optimal) compression ratio $\frac12$, i.e., the sum of the overlaps in the output string is at least half the sum of the overlaps in an optimal solution. We also provide a linear-time implementation of our algorithm.
  • We give efficient algorithms for ranking Lyndon words of length n over an alphabet of size {\sigma}. The rank of a Lyndon word is its position in the sequence of lexicographically ordered Lyndon words of the same length. The outputs are integers of exponential size, and complexity of arithmetic operations on such large integers cannot be ignored. Our model of computations is the word-RAM, in which basic arithmetic operations on (large) numbers of size at most {\sigma}^n take O(n) time. Our algorithm for ranking Lyndon words makes O(n^2) arithmetic operations (this would imply directly cubic time on word-RAM). However, using an algebraic approach we are able to reduce the total time complexity on the word-RAM to O(n^2 log {\sigma}). We also present an O(n^3 log^2 {\sigma})-time algorithm that generates the Lyndon word of a given length and rank in lexicographic order. Finally we use the connections between Lyndon words and lexicographically minimal de Bruijn sequences (theorem of Fredricksen and Maiorana) to develop the first polynomial-time algorithm for decoding minimal de Bruijn sequence of any rank n (it determines the position of an arbitrary word of length n within the de Bruijn sequence).
  • We generalize Karp-Rabin string matching to handle multiple patterns in $\mathcal{O}(n \log n + m)$ time and $\mathcal{O}(s)$ space, where $n$ is the length of the text and $m$ is the total length of the $s$ patterns, returning correct answers with high probability. As a prime application of our algorithm, we show how to approximate the LZ77 parse of a string of length $n$. If the optimal parse consists of $z$ phrases, using only $\mathcal{O}(z)$ working space we can return a parse consisting of at most $(1+\varepsilon)z$ phrases in $\mathcal{O}(\varepsilon^{-1}n\log n)$ time, for any $\varepsilon\in (0,1]$. As previous quasilinear-time algorithms for LZ77 use $\Omega(n/\textrm{polylog }n)$ space, but $z$ can be exponentially small in $n$, these improvements in space are substantial.
  • We present an improved wavelet tree construction algorithm and discuss its applications to a number of rank/select problems for integer keys and strings. Given a string of length n over an alphabet of size $\sigma\leq n$, our method builds the wavelet tree in $O(n \log \sigma/ \sqrt{\log{n}})$ time, improving upon the state-of-the-art algorithm by a factor of $\sqrt{\log n}$. As a consequence, given an array of n integers we can construct in $O(n \sqrt{\log n})$ time a data structure consisting of $O(n)$ machine words and capable of answering rank/select queries for the subranges of the array in $O(\log n / \log \log n)$ time. This is a $\log \log n$-factor improvement in query time compared to Chan and P\u{a}tra\c{s}cu and a $\sqrt{\log n}$-factor improvement in construction time compared to Brodal et al. Next, we switch to stringological context and propose a novel notion of wavelet suffix trees. For a string w of length n, this data structure occupies $O(n)$ words, takes $O(n \sqrt{\log n})$ time to construct, and simultaneously captures the combinatorial structure of substrings of w while enabling efficient top-down traversal and binary search. In particular, with a wavelet suffix tree we are able to answer in $O(\log |x|)$ time the following two natural analogues of rank/select queries for suffixes of substrings: for substrings x and y of w count the number of suffixes of x that are lexicographically smaller than y, and for a substring x of w and an integer k, find the k-th lexicographically smallest suffix of x. We further show that wavelet suffix trees allow to compute a run-length-encoded Burrows-Wheeler transform of a substring x of w in $O(s \log |x|)$ time, where s denotes the length of the resulting run-length encoding. This answers a question by Cormode and Muthukrishnan, who considered an analogous problem for Lempel-Ziv compression.