• We present a new transit timing catalog of 2599 Kepler Objects of Interest (=KOIs), using the PDC-MAP long-cadence light curves that include the full seventeen quarters of the mission (ftp://wise- ftp.tau.ac.il/pub/tauttv/TTV/ver_112). The goal is to produce an easy-to-use catalog that can stimulate further analyses of interesting systems. For 779 KOIs with high enough SNRs, we derived the timing, duration and depth of 69,914 transits. For 1820 KOIs with lower SNR, we derived only the timing of 225,273 transits. After removal of outlier timings, we derived various statistics for each KOI that were used to indicate significant variations. Including systems found by previous works, we have detected 260 KOIs which showed significant TTVs with long-term variations (>100 day), and another fourteen KOIs with periodic modulations shorter than 100 day and small amplitudes. For five of those, the periodicity is probably due to the crossing of rotating stellar spots by the transiting planets.
  • A few studies have reported a significant dearth of exoplanets with Neptune mass and radius with orbital periods below $2$--$4$ d. This cannot be explained by observational biases because many Neptunian planets with longer orbital periods have been detected. The existence of this desert is similar to the appearance of the so-called brown-dwarf desert that suggests different formation mechanisms of planets and stellar companions with short orbital periods. Similarly, the Neptunian desert might indicate different mechanisms of formation and evolution for hot Jupiters and short-period super-Earths. We here follow a previous study and examine the location and shape of the desert in both the period-mass and period-radius planes, using the currently available large samples of planets. The desert in the period-mass plane has a relatively sharp upper edge, with a planetary mass that is inversely proportional to the planetary orbital period, while the lower, somewhat blurred, boundary is located along masses that are apparently linearly proportional to the period. The desert in the period-radius plane of the transiting planets is less clear. It seems as if the radius along the upper boundary is inversely proportional to the period to the power of one-third, while the lower boundary shows a radius that is proportional to the period to the power of two-thirds. The combination of the two upper bounds of the desert, in the period-mass and period-radius planes, yields a planetary mass-radius relation of $R_{\rm p}/R_{\rm Jup}\simeq (1.2\pm0.3)(M_{\rm p}/M_{\rm Jup})^{0.27\pm0.11}\,$ for $ 0.1\lesssim M_{\rm p}/M_{\rm Jup}\lesssim 1$. The derived shape of the desert, which might extend up to periods of $5$--$10$ d, could shed some light on the formation and evolution of close-in planets.
  • We infer dynamical masses in eight multi-planet systems using transit times measured from Kepler's complete dataset, including short-cadence data where available. Of the eighteen dynamical masses that we infer, ten pass multiple tests for robustness. These are in systems; Kepler-26 (KOI-250), Kepler-29 (KOI-738), Kepler-60 (KOI-2086), Kepler-105 (KOI-115), and Kepler-307 (KOI-1576). Kepler-105 c has a density consistent with an Earth-like composition. Strong TTV signals were detected from additional planets, but their inferred masses were sensitive to outliers or consistent solutions could not be found with independently-measured transit times, including planets at; Kepler-49 (KOI-248), Kepler-57 (KOI-1270), Kepler-105 (KOI-115) and Kepler-177 (KOI-523). Strong upper limits on the mass of Kepler-177 c imply an extremely low density ~0.1 g cm$^{-3}$. In most cases, individual orbital eccentricities were poorly constrained due to degeneracies in TTV inversion. For five planet pairs in our sample, strong secular interactions imply a moderate-to-high likelihood of apsidal alignment over a wide range of possible eccentricities. We also find solutions for the three planets known to orbit Kepler-60 in a Laplace-like resonance chain. However, non-librating solutions also match the transit-timing data. For six systems, we calculate more precise stellar parameters than previously known, enabling useful constraints on planetary densities where we have robust mass measurements. Placing these exoplanets on the mass-radius diagram, we find a wide range of densities is observed among sub-Neptune mass planets and that the range in observed densities is anti-correlated with incident flux.
  • Mazeh, Holczer, and Shporer (2015) have presented an approach that can, in principle, use the derived transit timing variation (TTV) of some transiting planets observed by the $Kepler$ mission to distinguish between prograde and retrograde motion of their orbits with respect to their parent stars' rotation. The approach utilizes TTVs induced by spot-crossing events that occur when the planet moves across a spot on the stellar surface, looking for a correlation between the derived TTVs and the stellar brightness derivatives at the corresponding transits. This can work even in data that cannot temporally resolve the spot-crossing events themselves. Here we apply this approach to the $Kepler$ KOIs, identifying nine systems where the photometric spot modulation is large enough and the transit timing accurate enough to allow detection of a TTV-brightness-derivatives correlation. Of those systems five show highly significant prograde motion (Kepler-17b, Kepler-71b, KOI-883.01, KOI-895.01, and KOI-1074.01), while no system displays retrograde motion, consistent with the suggestion that planets orbiting cool stars have prograde motion. All five systems have impact parameter $0.2\lesssim b\lesssim0.5$, and all systems within that impact parameter range show significant correlation, except HAT-P-11b where the lack of a correlation follows its large stellar obliquity. Our search suffers from an observational bias against detection of high impact parameter cases, and the detected sample is extremely small. Nevertheless, our findings may suggest that stellar spots, or at least the larger ones, tend to be located at a low stellar latitude, but not along the stellar equator, similar to the Sun.
  • Some transiting planets discovered by the Kepler mission display transit timing variations (TTVs) induced by stellar spots that rotate on the visible hemisphere of their parent stars. An induced TTV can be observed when a planet crosses a spot and modifies the shape of the transit light curve, even if the time resolution of the data does not allow to detect the crossing event itself. We present an approach that can, in some cases, use the derived TTVs of a planet to distinguish between a prograde and a retrograde planetary motion with respect to the stellar rotation. Assuming a single spot darker than the stellar disc, spot crossing by the planet can induce measured positive (negative) TTV, if the crossing occurs in the first (second) half of the transit. On the other hand, the motion of the spot towards (away from) the center of the stellar visible disc causes the stellar brightness to decrease (increase). Therefore, for a planet with prograde motion, the induced TTV is positive when the local slope of the stellar flux at the time of transit is negative, and vice versa. Thus, we can expect to observe a negative (positive) correlation between the TTVs and the photometric slopes for prograde (retrograde) motion. Using a simplistic analytical approximation, and also the publicly available SOAP-T tool to produce light curves of transits with spot-crossing events, we show for some cases how the induced TTVs depend on the local stellar photometric slopes at the transit timings. Detecting this correlation in Kepler transiting systems with high enough signal-to-noise ratio can allow us to distinguish between prograde and retrograde planetary motions. In coming papers we present analyses of the KOIs and Kepler eclipsing binaries, following the formalism developed here.
  • The winds of ionized gas driven by Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) can be studied through absorption lines in their X-ray spectra. A recurring feature of these outflows is their broad ionization distribution, including essentially all ionization levels (e.g., Fe^0+ to Fe^25+). This characteristic feature can be quantified with the absorption measure distribution (AMD), defined as the distribution of column density with ionization parameter |dN / dlog xi|. Observed AMDs extend over 0.1 < xi < 10^4 (cgs), and are remarkably similar in different objects. Power-law fits (|dN /dlog xi| ~ N_1 xi^a) yield N_1 = 3x10^{21} cm^-2 +- 0.4 dex and a = 0 -- 0.4. What is the source of this broad ionization distribution, and what sets the small range of observed $N_1$ and $a$? A common interpretation is a multiphase outflow, with a wide range of gas densities in a uniform gas pressure medium. However, the incident radiation pressure leads to a gas pressure gradient in the photoionized gas, and therefore to a broad range of ionization states within a single slab. We show that this compression of the gas by the radiation pressure leads to an AMD with |dN / dlog xi| = 8x10^21 xi^0.03 cm^-2, remarkably similar to that observed. The calculated values of $N_1$ and $a$ depend weakly on the gas metallicity, the ionizing spectral slope, the distance from the nucleus, the ambient density, and the total absorber column. Thus, radiation pressure compression (RPC) of the photoionized gas provides a natural explanation for the observed AMD. RPC predicts that the gas pressure increases with decreasing ionization, which can be used to test the validity of RPC in ionized AGN outflows.
  • Following Ford et al. (2011, 2012) and Steffen et al. (2012) we derived the transit timing of 1960 Kepler KOIs using the pre-search data conditioning (PDC) light curves of the first twelve quarters of the Kepler data. For 721 KOIs with large enough SNRs, we obtained also the duration and depth of each transit. The results are presented as a catalog for the community to use. We derived a few statistics of our results that could be used to indicate significant variations. Including systems found by previous works, we have found 130 KOIs that showed highly significant TTVs, and 13 that had short-period TTV modulations with small amplitudes. We consider two effects that could cause apparent periodic TTV - the finite sampling of the observations and the interference with the stellar activity, stellar spots in particular. We briefly discuss some statistical aspects of our detected TTVs. We show that the TTV period is correlated with the orbital period of the planet and with the TTV amplitude.
  • By analyzing the X-ray spectra of NGC 3516 from 2001 and 2006 obtained with the HETGS spectrometer on board the Chandra observatory, we find that the kinematic structure of the outflow can be well represented by four outflow components intrinsic to NGC 3516. The outflow velocities of the different components are 350 +-100 km s-1, 1500 +-150 km s-1, 2600 +-200 km s-1 and 4000 +-400 km s-1 for components 1, 2, 3 and 4, respectively. A local component at z = 0 could be confused with intrinsic component 3. Components 1 and 2 have a broad range of ionization manifested by absorption from 23 different charge states of Fe. Component 3 and 4 are more highly ionized and show absorption from only 9 different charge states of Fe, however we were able to reconstruct the absorption measure distribution (AMD) for all four. The total column density of each component is NH = (1.8+- 0.5) X10^22 cm-2, NH = (2.5+- 0.3) X10^22 cm-2, NH = (6.9+- 4.3) X10^22 cm-2 and NH = (5.4+- 1.2) X10^22 cm-2, respectively. The fast components 3 and 4 appear only in the high state of 2006 and not in 2001, while the slower components persist during both epochs. On the other hand, there is no significant absorption variability within days during 2001 or during 2006. We find that covering factor plays a minor role for the line absorption.
  • By analyzing the X-ray spectrum of MCG-6-30-15 obtained with the HETG spectrometer on board the Chandra Observatory, we identify three kinematically distinct absorption systems; two outflow components intrinsic to MCG-6-30-15, and one local at z = 0. The slow outflow at -100 +/- 50 km s^-1 has a large range of ionization manifested by absorption from 24 different charge states of Fe, which enables a detailed reconstruction of the absorption measure distribution (AMD). This AMD spans five orders of magnitude in ionization parameter: -1.5 < log xi < 3.5 (cgs units), with a total column density of N_H = (5.3 +/- 0.7) x 10^21 cm^-2. The fast outflow at -1900 +/- 150 km s^-1 has a well defined ionization parameter with log xi = 3.82 +/- 0.03 (cgs units) and column density N_H = 8.1 +/- 0.7 x 10^22 cm^-2. Assuming this component is a thin, uniform, spherical shell, it can be estimated to lie within 11 light days of the \agn center. The third component, most clearly detected in the lower oxygen charge states O^+1 - O^+6, has been confused in the past with the fast outflow, but is identified here with local gas z = 0 and a total column density N_H of a few 10^20 cm^-2. Finally, we exploit the excellent spectral resolution of the HETGS and use the present spectrum to determine the rest-frame wavelengths of oxygen inner-shell lines that were previously uncertain.
  • We analyze the Chandra X-ray spectrum obtained with the HETGS grating spectrometer of IRAS 13349+2438, which has one of the richest absorption spectra of a quasar outflow. Absorption from almost all charge states of Fe is detected. This allows for a detailed reconstruction of the absorption measure distribution (AMD), which we define as the continuous distribution of column density as a function of ionization parameter. We find a double peaked AMD for IRAS 13349+2438 with a total (ionized) column density of N_H = (1.2 +- 0.3)* 10^{22} cm^-2} assuming solar iron abundance. For comparison, we perform a similar analysis on the well studied HETGS spectrum of NGC 3783. Both sources feature a deep minimum in column density consistent with no absorption from gas at temperatures of 4.5 < log T < 5 (K). We interpret the minima as observational evidence for thermal instability in this temperature regime.
  • The X-ray emission of many active galactic nuclei (AGNs) is absorbed between 15 and 17 Angstrom by means of unresolved (inner-shell) transition arrays (UTAs) of Fe M-shell ions. The outflow velocities implied by the Doppler shifts of the individual UTAs in the spectrum have never before been measured. Thus, the Fe-M absorber has been commonly assumed to be part of the ionized AGN outflow, whose velocities are readily obtained from more easily measured spectral lines. The best spectrum of Fe-M absorption is available from the integrated 900 ks Chandra HETGS observations of NGC 3783, in which some Fe-M ions are clearly resolved. We measure the velocities of the individual Fe-M ions in NGC 3783 for the first time. Surprisingly, we find that the Fe-M absorber, most noticeably Fe$^{+8}$, Fe$^{+9}$, and Fe$^{+10}$, is not outflowing at the same velocity as the previously known wind. In fact, it appears to be stationary and therefore not part of the outflow at all. It could, alternatively, be ascribed to the skin of the dusty torus. This reduces appreciably the mass loss rate estimated for the NGC 3783 outflow and perhaps for other similar sources as well, in which the various Fe-M ions are not resolved.