• The 2.1-s anomalous X-ray pulsar 1E 1547.0-5408 exhibited an X-ray outburst on 2009 January 22, emitting a large number of short bursts. The wide-band all- sky monitor (WAM) on-board Suzaku detected at least 254 bursts in the 160keV-6.2MeV band over the period of January 22 00:57-17:02 UT from the direction of 1E 1547.0-5408. One of these bursts, which occurred at 06:45:13, produced the brightest fluence in the 0.5-6.2MeV range, with an averaged 0.16-6.2MeV flux and extrapolated 25 keV-2 MeV fluence of about 3x10-6 erg cm-2 s-1 and about 3x10-4 erg cm-2, respectively. After pile-up corrections, the time-resolved WAM spectra of this burst were well-fitted in the 0.16-6.2MeV range by two-component models; specifically, a blackbody plus an optically thin thermal bremsstrahlung or a combination of a blackbody and a power-law component with an exponential cutoff. These results are compared with previous works reporting the persistent emission and weaker short bursts followed by the same outburst.
  • The Crab Nebula is one of the brightest and most stable sources in the X-ray sky. Year-scale flux variation from the object was recently revealed in the hard X-ray band by four satellites. This marked the first detection of year-scale variability from pulsar wind nebulae in the hard X-ray band. The Crab Nebula has been observed at least once a year for calibration purposes with the Suzaku Hard X-ray Detector (HXD) since its launch in 2005. In order to investigate possible spectral changes as well as flux variation, the archival data of the HXD were analyzed. The flux variation reported by other instruments was confirmed in the 25 -- 100 keV band by the HXD in a few percent level, but flux above 100 keV did not follow the trend in variation below 100 keV. The hardness ratios produced utilizing the PIN and GSO sensors installed in the HXD exhibit significant scattering, thereby indicating spectral variations in the hard X-ray. The spectral changes are quantified by spectral fitting with a broken power-law model. The difference between the two photon indexes of the broken power-law model in harder and softer energy bands is in the range of < 2.54. Taking into account flux variation of 6.3% and spectral variation time-scale of a few days, multi components of the broken power-law-shaped synchrotron emission with different cooling times are suggested.
  • Improvements of in-orbit calibration of GSO scintillators in the Hard X-ray Detector on board Suzaku are reported. To resolve an apparent change of the energy scale of GSO which appeared across the launch for unknown reasons, consistent and thorough re-analyses of both pre-launch and in-orbit data have been performed. With laboratory experiments using spare hardware, the pulse height offset, corresponding to zero energy input, was found to change by ~0.5 of the full analog voltage scale, depending on the power supply. Furthermore, by carefully calculating all the light outputs of secondaries from activation lines used in the in-orbit gain determination, their energy deposits in GSO were found to be effectively lower, by several percent, than their nominal energies. Taking both these effects into account, the in-orbit data agrees with the on-ground measurements within ~5%, without employing the artificial correction introduced in the previous work (Kokubun et al. 2007). With this knowledge, we updated the data processing, the response, and the auxiliary files of GSO, and reproduced the HXD-PIN and HXD-GSO spectra of the Crab Nebula over 12-300 keV by a broken powerlaw with a break energy of ~110 keV.