• We examine the linear stability of an isothermal filamentary cloud permeated by a perpendicular magnetic field. Our model cloud is assumed to be supported by gas pressure against the self-gravity in the unperturbed state. For simplicity, the density distribution is assumed to be symmetric around the axis. Also for simplicity, the initial magnetic field is assumed to be uniform and turbulence is not taken into account. The perturbation equation is formulated to be an eigenvalue problem. The growth rate is obtained as a function of the wavenumber for fragmentation along the axis and the magnetic field strength. The growth rate depends critically on the outer boundary. If the displacement vanishes in the region very far from the cloud axis (fixed boundary), cloud fragmentation is suppressed by a moderate magnetic field, which means the plasma beta is below 1.67 on the cloud axis. If the displacement is constant along the magnetic field in the region very far from the cloud, the cloud is unstable even when the magnetic field is infinitely strong. The cloud is deformed by circulation in the plane perpendicular to the magnetic field. The unstable mode is not likely to induce dynamical collapse, since it is excited even when the whole cloud is magnetically subcritical. For both the boundary conditions the magnetic field increases the wavelength of the most unstable mode. We find that the magnetic force suppresses compression perpendicular to the magnetic field especially in the region of low density.
  • We have resolved for the first time the radial and vertical structure of the almost edge-on envelope/disk system of the low-mass Class 0 protostar L1527. For that, we have used ALMA observations with a spatial resolution of 0.25$^{\prime\prime}$$\times$0.13$^{\prime\prime}$ and 0.37$^{\prime\prime}$$\times$0.23$^{\prime\prime}$ at 0.8 mm and 1.2 mm, respectively. The L1527 dust continuum emission has a deconvolved size of 78 au $\times$ 21 au, and shows a flared disk-like structure. A thin infalling-rotating envelope is seen in the CCH emission outward of about 150 au, and its thickness is increased by a factor of 2 inward of it. This radius lies between the centrifugal radius (200 au) and the centrifugal barrier of the infalling-rotating envelope (100 au). The gas stagnates in front of the centrifugal barrier and moves toward vertical directions. SO emission is concentrated around and inside the centrifugal barrier. The rotation speed of the SO emitting gas is found to be decelerated around the centrifugal barrier. A part of the angular momentum could be extracted by the gas which moves away from the mid-plane around the centrifugal barrier. If this is the case, the centrifugal barrier would be related to the launching mechanism of low velocity outflows, such as disk winds.
  • We report the ALMA Cycle 2 observations of the Class I binary protostellar system L1551 NE in the 0.9-mm continuum, C18O (3-2), 13CO (3-2), SO (7_8-6_7), and the CS (7-6) emission. At 0.18" (= 25 AU) resolution, ~4-times higher than that of our Cycle 0 observations, the circumbinary disk as seen in the 0.9-mm emission is shown to be comprised of a northern and a southern spiral arm, with the southern arm connecting to the circumstellar disk around Source B. The western parts of the spiral arms are brighter than the eastern parts, suggesting the presence of an m=1 spiral mode. In the C18O emission, the infall gas motions in the inter-arm regions and the outward gas motions in the arms are identified. These observed features are well reproduced with our numerical simulations, where gravitational torques from the binary system impart angular momenta to the spiral-arm regions and extract angular momenta from the inter-arm regions. Chemical differentiation of the circumbinary disk is seen in the four molecular species. Our Cycle 2 observations have also resolved the circumstellar disks around the individual protostars, and the beam-deconvolved sizes are 0.29" X 0.19" (= 40 X 26 AU) (P.A. = 144 deg) and 0.26" X 0.20" (= 36 X 27 AU) (P.A. = 147 deg) for Sources A and B, respectively. The position and inclination angles of these circumstellar disks are misaligned with that of the circumbinary disk. The C18O emission traces the Keplerian rotation of the misaligned disk around Source A.
  • We investigate the dust distribution in the crescent disk around HD 142527 based on the continuum emission at $890 \mathrm{\ \mu m}$ obtained by ALMA Cycle 0. The map is divided into $18$ azimuthal sectors, and the radial intensity profile in each sector is reproduced with a 2D disk model. Our model takes account of scattering and inclination of the disk as well as the azimuthal dependence in intensity. When the dust is assumed to have the conventional composition and maximum size of $1\ \mathrm{mm}$, the northwestern region ($PA=329^{\circ}-29^{\circ}$) cannot be reproduced. This is because the model intensity gets insensitive to the increase in surface density due to heavy self-scattering, reaching its ceiling much lower than the observed intensity. The ceiling depends on the position angle. When the scattering opacity is reduced by a factor of $10$, the intensity distribution is reproduced successfully in all the sectors including those in the northwestern region. The best fit model parameters depend little on the scattering opacity in the southern region where the disk is optically thin. The contrast of dust surface density along $PA$ is derived to be about $40$, much smaller than the value for the cases of conventional opacities ($70-130$). These results strongly suggest that the albedo is lower than considered by some reasons at least in the northwestern region.
  • We present the polarization observations toward the circumstellar disk around HD 142527 by using Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) at the frequency of 343 GHz. The beam size is $0.51 " \times 0.44 "$, which corresponds to the spatial resolution of $\sim$ 71 $\times$ 62 AU. The polarized intensity displays a ring-like structure with a peak located on the east side with a polarization fraction of $P= 3.26 \pm 0.02$ %, which is different from the peak of the continuum emission from the northeast region. The polarized intensity is significantly weaker at the peak of the continuum where $P= 0.220 \pm 0.010$ %. The polarization vectors are in the radial direction in the main ring of the polarized intensity, while there are two regions outside at the northwest and northeast areas where the vectors are in the azimuthal direction. If the polarization vectors represent the magnetic field morphology, the polarization vectors indicate the toroidal magnetic field configuration on the main ring and the poloidal fields outside. On the other hand, the flip of the polarization vectors is predicted by the self-scattering of thermal dust emission due to the change of the direction of thermal radiation flux. Therefore, we conclude that self-scattering of thermal dust emission plays a major role in producing polarization at millimeter wavelengths in this protoplanetary disk. Also, this puts a constraint on the maximum grain size to be approximately 150 ${\rm \mu m}$ if we assume compact spherical dust grains.
  • We analyze the cosmic-ray magnetohydrodynamic (CR MHD) equations to improve the numerical simulations. We propose to solve them in the fully conservation form, which is equivalent to the conventional CR MHD equations. In the fully conservation form, the CR energy equation is replaced with the CR "number" conservation, where the CR number density is defined as the three fourths power of the CR energy density. The former contains an extra source term, while latter does not. An approximate Riemann solver is derived from the CR MHD equations in the fully conservation form. Based on the analysis, we propose a numerical scheme of which solutions satisfy the Rankine-Hugoniot relation at any shock. We demonstrate that it reproduces the Riemann solution derived by Pfrommer et al. (2006) for a 1D CR hydrodynamic shock tube problem. We compare the solution with those obtained by solving the CR energy equation. The latter solutions deviate from the Riemann solution seriously, when the CR pressure dominates over the gas pressure in the post-shocked gas. The former solutions converge to the Riemann solution and are of the second order accuracy in space and time. Our numerical examples include an expansion of high pressure sphere in an magnetized medium. Fast and slow shocks are sharply resolved in the example. We also discuss possible extension of the CR MHD equations to evaluate the average CR energy.
  • We present observations at 7 mm that fully resolve the two circumstellar disks, and a reanalyses of archival observations at 3.5 cm that resolve along their major axes the two ionized jets, of the class I binary protostellar system L1551 NE. We show that the two circumstellar disks are better fit by a shallow inner and steep outer power-law than a truncated power-law. The two disks have very different transition radii between their inner and outer regions of $\sim$18.6 AU and $\sim$8.9 AU respectively. Assuming that they are intrinsically circular and geometrically thin, we find that the two circumstellar disks are parallel with each other and orthogonal in projection to their respective ionized jets. Furthermore, the two disks are closely aligned if not parallel with their circumbinary disk. Over an interval of $\sim$10 yr, source B (possessing the circumsecondary disk) has moved northwards with respect to and likely away from source A, indicating an orbital motion in the same direction as the rotational motion of their circumbinary disk. All the aforementioned elements therefore share the same axis for their angular momentum, indicating that L1551 NE is a product of rotationally-driven fragmentation of its parental core. Assuming a circular orbit, the relative disk sizes are compatible with theoretical predictions for tidal truncation by a binary system having a mass ratio of $\sim$0.2, in agreement with the reported relative separations of the two protostars from the center of their circumbinary disk. The transition radii of both disks, however, are a factor of $\gtrsim$1.5 smaller than their predicted tidally-truncated radii.
  • Either bulk rotation or local turbulence is widely invoked to drive fragmentation in collapsing cores so as to produce multiple star systems. Even when the two mechanisms predict different manners in which the stellar spins and orbits are aligned, subsequent internal or external interactions can drive multiple systems towards or away from alignment thus masking their formation process. Here, we demonstrate that the geometrical and dynamical relationship between the binary system and its surrounding bulk envelope provide the crucial distinction between fragmentation models. We find that the circumstellar disks of the binary protostellar system L1551 IRS 5 are closely parallel not just with each other but also with their surrounding flattened envelope. Measurements of the relative proper motion of the binary components spanning nearly 30 yr indicate an orbital motion in the same sense as the envelope rotation. Eliminating orbital solutions whereby the circumstellar disks would be tidally truncated to sizes smaller than are observed, the remaining solutions favor a circular or low-eccentricity orbit tilted by up to $\sim$25$^\circ$ from the circumstellar disks. Turbulence-driven fragmentation can generate local angular momentum to produce a coplanar binary system, but which bears no particular relationship with its surrounding envelope. Instead, the observed properties conform with predictions for rotationally-driven fragmentation. If the fragments were produced at different heights or on opposite sides of the midplane in the flattened central region of a rotating core, the resulting protostars would then exhibit circumstellar disks parallel with the surrounding envelope but tilted from the orbital plane as is observed.
  • We investigate the dust and gas distribution in the disk around HD 142527 based on ALMA observations of dust continuum, 13CO(3-2), and C18O(3-2) emission. The disk shows strong azimuthal asymmetry in the dust continuum emission, while gas emission is more symmetric. In this paper, we investigate how gas and dust are distributed in the dust-bright northern part of the disk and in the dust-faint southern part. We construct two axisymmetric disk models. One reproduces the radial profiles of the continuum and the velocity moments 0 and 1 of CO lines in the north and the other reproduces those in the south. We have found that the dust is concentrated in a narrow ring having ~50AU width (in FWHM; w_d=30AU in our parameter definition) located at ~170-200AU from the central star. The dust particles are strongly concentrated in the north. We have found that the dust surface density contrast between the north and south amounts to ~70. Compared to the dust, the gas distribution is more extended in the radial direction. We find that the gas component extends at least from ~100AU to ~250AU from the central star, and there should also be tenuous gas remaining inside and outside of these radii. The azimuthal asymmetry of gas distribution is much smaller than dust. The gas surface density differs only by a factor of ~3-10 between the north and south. Hence, gas-to-dust ratio strongly depends on the location of the disk: ~30 at the location of the peak of dust distribution in the south and ~3 at the location of the peak of dust distribution in the north. Despite large uncertainties, the overall gas-to-dust ratio is inferred to be ~10-30, indicating that the gas depletion may have already been under way.
  • We present a new method to constrain the grain size in protoplanetary disks with polarization observations at millimeter wavelengths. If dust grains are grown to the size comparable to the wavelengths, the dust grains are expected to have a large scattering opacity and thus the continuum emission is expected to be polarized due to self-scattering. We perform 3D radiative transfer calculations to estimate the polarization degree for the protoplanetary disks having radial Gaussian-like dust surface density distributions, which have been recently discovered. The maximum grain size is set to be $100 {\rm~\mu m}$ and the observing wavelength to be 870 ${\rm \mu m}$. We find that the polarization degree is as high as 2.5 % with a subarcsec spatial resolution, which is likely to be detected with near-future ALMA observations. The emission is polarized due to scattering of anisotropic continuum emission. The map of the polarization degree shows a double peaked distribution and the polarization vectors are in the radial direction in the inner ring and in the azimuthal direction in the outer ring. We also find the wavelength dependence of the polarization degree: the polarization degree is the highest if dust grains have a maximum size of $a_{\rm max}\sim\lambda/2\pi$, where $\lambda$ is the observing wavelength. Hence, multi-wave and spatially resolved polarization observations toward protoplanetary disks enable us to put a constraint on the grain size. The constraint on the grain size from polarization observations is independent of or may be even stronger than that from the opacity index.
  • We have constructed two types of analytical models for an isothermal filamentary cloud supported mainly by magnetic tension. The first one describes an isolated cloud while the second considers filamentary clouds spaced periodically. Both the models assume that the filamentary clouds are highly flattened. The former is proved to be the asymptotic limit of the latter in which each filamentary cloud is much thinner than the distance to the neighboring filaments. We show that these models reproduce main features of the 2D equilibrium model of Tomisaka (2014) for filamentary cloud threaded by perpendicular magnetic field. It is also shown that the critical mass to flux ratio is $ M /\Phi = (2 \pi \sqrt{G}) ^{-1} $, where $ M $, $ \Phi $ and $ G $ denote the cloud mass, the total magnetic flux of the cloud, and the gravitational constant, respectively. This upper bound coincides with that for an axisymmetric cloud supported by poloidal magnetic fields. We applied the variational principle for studying the Jeans instability of the first model. Our model cloud is unstable against fragmentation as well as the filamentary clouds threaded by longitudinal magnetic field. The fastest growing mode has a wavelength several times longer than the cloud diameter. The second model describes quasi-static evolution of filamentary molecular cloud by ambipolar diffusion.
  • We report the ALMA observation of the Class I binary protostellar system L1551 NE in the 0.9-mm continuum, C18O (3-2), and 13CO (3-2) lines at a ~1.6 times higher resolution and a ~6 times higher sensitivity than those of our previous SMA observations, which revealed a r ~300 AU-scale circumbinary disk in Keplerian rotation. The 0.9-mm continuum shows two opposing U-shaped brightenings in the circumbinary disk, and exhibits a depression between the circumbinary disk and the circumstellar disk of the primary protostar. The molecular lines trace non-axisymmetric deviations from Keplerian rotation in the circumbinary disk at higher velocities relative to the systemic velocity, where our previous SMA observations could not detect the lines. In addition, we detect inward motion along the minor axis of the circumbinary disk. To explain the newly-observed features, we performed a numerical simulation of gas orbits in a Roche potential tailored to the inferred properties of L1551 NE. The observed U-shaped dust features coincide with locations where gravitational torques from the central binary system are predicted to impart angular momentum to the circumbinary disk, producing shocks and hence density enhancements seen as a pair of spiral arms. The observed inward gas motion coincides with locations where angular momentum is predicted to be lowered by the gravitational torques. The good agreement between our observation and model indicates that gravitational torques from the binary stars constitute the primary driver for exchanging angular momentum so as to permit infall through the circumbinary disk of L1551 NE.
  • We report ALMA observations of dust continuum, 13CO J=3--2, and C18O J=3--2 line emission toward a gapped protoplanetary disk around HD 142527. The outer horseshoe-shaped disk shows the strong azimuthal asymmetry in dust continuum with the contrast of about 30 at 336 GHz between the northern peak and the southwestern minimum. In addition, the maximum brightness temperature of 24 K at its northern area is exceptionally high at 160 AU from a star. To evaluate the surface density in this region, the grain temperature needs to be constrained and was estimated from the optically thick 13CO J=3--2 emission. The lower limit of the peak surface density was then calculated to be 28 g cm-2 by assuming a canonical gas-to-dust mass ratio of 100. This finding implies that the region is locally too massive to withstand self-gravity since Toomre's Q <~1--2, and thus, it may collapse into a gaseous protoplanet. Another possibility is that the gas mass is low enough to be gravitationally stable and only dust grains are accumulated. In this case, lower gas-to-dust ratio by at least 1 order of magnitude is required, implying possible formation of a rocky planetary core.
  • We show a numerical scheme to solve the moment equations of the radiative transfer, i.e., M1 model which follows the evolution of the energy density, $ E $, and the energy flux, $ \mbox{\boldmath$F$} $. In our scheme we reconstruct the intensity from $ E $ and $ \mbox{\boldmath$F$} $ so that it is consistent with the closure relation, relation, $ \chi = (3 + 4 f ^2)/(5 + 2 \sqrt{4 - 3 f ^2}) $. Here the symbols, $ \chi $, $ f = |\mbox{\boldmath$F$}|/(cE) $, and $ c $, denote the Eddington factor, the reduced flux, and the speed of light, respectively. We evaluate the numerical flux across the cell surface from the kinetically reconstructed intensity. It is an explicit function of $ E $ and $ \mbox{\boldmath$F$} $ in the neighboring cells across the surface considered. We include absorption and reemission within a numerical cell in the evaluation of the numerical flux. The numerical flux approaches to the diffusion approximation when the numerical cell itself is optically thick. Our numerical flux gives a stable solution even when some regions computed are very optically thick. We show the advantages of the numerical flux with examples. They include flash of beamed photons and irradiated protoplanetary disks.
  • We investigate protostellar collapse of molecular cloud cores by numerical simulations, taking into account turbulence and magnetic fields. By using the adaptive mesh refinement technique, the collapse is followed over a wide dynamic range from the scale of a turbulent cloud core to that of the first core. The cloud core is lumpy in the low density region owing to the turbulence, while it has a smooth density distribution in the dense region produced by the collapse. The shape of the dense region depends mainly on the mass of the cloud core; a massive cloud core tends to be prolate while a less massive cloud core tends to be oblate. In both cases, anisotropy of the dense region increases during the isothermal collapse. The minor axis of the dense region is always oriented parallel to the local magnetic field. All the models eventually yield spherical first cores supported mainly by the thermal pressure. Most of turbulent cloud cores exhibit protostellar outflows around the first cores. These outflows are classified into two types, bipolar and spiral flows, according to the morphology of the associated magnetic field. Bipolar flow often appears in the less massive cloud core. The rotation axis of the first core is oriented parallel to the local magnetic field for bipolar flow, while the orientation of the rotation axis from the global magnetic field depends on the magnetic field strength. In spiral flow, the rotation axis is not aligned with the local magnetic field.
  • Studies of the structure and evolution of protoplanetary disks are important for understanding star and planet formation. Here, we present the direct image of an interacting binary protoplanetary system. Both circumprimary and circumsecondary disks are resolved in the near-infrared. There is a bridge of infrared emission connecting the two disks and a long spiral arm extending from the circumprimary disk. Numerical simulations show that the bridge corresponds to gas flow and a shock wave caused by the collision of gas rotating around the primary and secondary stars. Fresh material streams along the spiral arm, consistent with the theoretical scenarios where gas is replenished from a circummultiple reservoir.
  • A new computational scheme is developed to study gas accretion from a circumbinary disk. The scheme decomposes the gas velocity into two components one of which denotes the Keplerian rotation and the other of which does the deviation from it. This scheme enables us to solve the centrifugal balance of a gas disk against gravity with better accuracy, since the former inertia force cancels the gravity. It is applied to circumbinary disk rotating around binary of which primary and secondary has mass ratio, 1.4:0.95. The gravity is reduced artificially softened only in small circular regions around the primary and secondary. The radii are 7% of the binary separation and much smaller than those in the previous grid based simulations. 7 Models are constructed to study dependence on the gas temperature and the initial inner radius of the disk. The gas accretion shows both fast and slow time variations while the binary is assumed to have a circular orbit. The time variation is due to oscillation of spiral arms in the circumbinary disk. The masses of primary and secondary disks increase while oscillating appreciably. The mass accretion rate tends to be higher for the primary disk although the secondary disk has a higher accretion rate in certain periods. The primary disk is perturbed intensely by the impact of gas flow so that the outer part is removed. The secondary disk is quiet in most of time on the contrary. Both the primary and secondary disks have traveling spiral waves which transfer angular momentum within them.
  • We have reexamined the similarity solution for a self-gravitating isothermal gas sphere and examined implication to star formation in a turbulent cloud. When parameters are adequately chosen, the similarity solution expresses an accreting isothermal gas sphere bounded by a spherical shock wave. The mass and radius of the sphere increases in proportion to the time, while the central density decreases in proportion to the inverse square of time. The similarity solution is specified by the accretion rate and the infall velocity. The accretion rate has an upper limit for a given infall velocity. When the accretion rate is below the upper limit, there exist a pair of similarity solutions for a given set of the accretion rate and infall velocity. One of them is confirmed to be unstable against a spherical perturbation. This means that the gas sphere collapses to initiate star formation only when the accretion rate is larger than the upper limit. We have also examined stability of the similarity solution against non-spherical perturbation. Non-spherical perturbations are found to be damped.
  • We show three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamical simulations of core collapse supernova in which the progenitor has magnetic fields inclined to the rotation axis. The simulations employed a simple empirical equation of state in which the pressure of degenerate gas is approximated by piecewise polytropes for simplicity. Neither energy loss due to neutrino is taken into account for simplicity. The simulations start from the stage of dynamical collapse of an iron core. The dynamical collapse halts at $ t $ = 189 ms by the pressure of high density gas and a proto-neutron star (PNS) forms. The evolution of PNS was followed about 40 milli-seconds in typical models. When the initial rotation is mildly fast and the initial magnetic fields are mildly strong, bipolar jets are launched from an upper atmosphere ($ r \sim 60 {\rm km} $) of the PNS. The jets are accelerated to $ \sim 3 \times 10 ^4 $ km s$^{-1}$, which is comparable to the escape velocity at the foot point. The jets are parallel to the initial rotation axis. Before the launch of the jets, magnetic fields are twisted by rotation of the PNS. The twisted magnetic fields form torus-shape multi-layers in which the azimuthal component changes alternately. The formation of magnetic multi-layers is due to the initial condition in which the magnetic fields are inclined with respect to the rotation axis. The energy of the jet depends only weakly on the initial magnetic field assumed. When the initial magnetic fields are weaker, the time lag is longer between the PNS formation and jet ejection. It is also shown that the time lag is related to the Alfv\'en transit time. Although the nearly spherical prompt shock propagates outward in our simulations, it is ...
  • We studied the collapse of rotating molecular cloud cores with inclined magnetic fields, based on three-dimensional numerical simulations.The numerical simulations start from a rotating Bonnor-Ebert isothermal cloud in a uniform magnetic field. The magnetic field is initially taken to be inclined from the rotation axis. As the cloud collapses, the magnetic field and rotation axis change their directions. When the rotation is slow and the magnetic field is relatively strong, the direction of the rotation axis changes to align with the magnetic field, as shown earlier by Matsumoto & Tomisaka. When the magnetic field is weak and the rotation is relatively fast, the magnetic field inclines to become perpendicular to the rotation axis. In other words, the evolution of the magnetic field and rotation axis depends on the relative strength of the rotation and magnetic field. Magnetic braking acts to align the rotation axis and magnetic field, while the rotation causes the magnetic field to incline through dynamo action. The latter effect dominates the former when the ratio of the angular velocity to the magnetic field is larger than a critical value \Omega_0/ B_0 > 0.39 G^1/2 c_s^-1, where B_0, \Omega_0, G, and c_s^-1 denote the initial magnetic field, initial angular velocity, gravitational constant, and sound speed, respectively. When the rotation is relatively strong, the collapsing cloud forms a disk perpendicular to the rotation axis and the magnetic field becomes nearly parallel to the disk surface in the high density region. A spiral structure appears due to the rotation and the wound-up magnetic field in the disk.
  • We discuss evolution of the magnetic flux density and angular velocity in a molecular cloud core, on the basis of three-dimensional numerical simulations, in which a rotating magnetized cloud fragments and collapses to form a very dense optically thick core of > 5 times 10 ^10 cm^-3 . As the density increases towards the formation of the optically thick core, the magnetic flux density and angular velocity converge towards a single relationship between the two quantities. If the core is magnetically dominated its magnetic flux density approaches 1.5 (n/5 times 10^10 cm^-3)^1/2 mG, while if the core is rotationally dominated the angular velocity approaches 2.57 times 10^-3, (n/5 times 10^10 cm^-3)^1/2 yr^-1, where n is the density of the gas. We also find that the ratio of the angular velocity to the magnetic flux density remains nearly constant until the density exceeds 5 times 10^10 cm^-3. Fragmentation of the very dense core and emergence of outflows from fragments are shown in the subsequent paper.
  • Subsequent to Paper I, the evolution and fragmentation of a rotating magnetized cloud are studied with use of three-dimensional MHD nested-grid simulations. After the isothermal runaway collapse, an adiabatic gas forms a protostellar first core at the center of the cloud. When the isothermal gas is stable for fragmentation in a contracting disk, the adiabatic core often breaks into several fragments. Conditions for fragmentation and binary formation are studied. All the cores which show fragmentations are geometrically thin, as the diameter-to-thickness ratio is larger than 3. Two patterns of fragmentation are found. (1) When a thin disk is supported by centrifugal force, the disk fragments through a ring configuration (ring fragmentation). This is realized in a fast rotating adiabatic core as Omega >0.2 tau_ff^-1, where Omega and tau_ff represent the angular rotation speed and the free-fall time of the core, respectively. (2) On the other hand, the disk is deformed to an elongated bar in the isothermal stage for a strongly magnetized or rapidly rotating cloud. The bar breaks into 2 - 4 fragments (bar fragmentation). Even if a disk is thin, the disk dominated by the magnetic force or thermal pressure is stable and forms a single compact body. In either ring or bar fragmentation mode, the fragments contract and a pair of outflows are ejected from the vicinities of the compact cores. The orbital angular momentum is larger than the spin angular momentum in the ring fragmentation. On the other hand, fragments often quickly merge in the bar fragmentation, since the orbital angular momentum is smaller than the spin angular momentum in this case. Comparison with observations is also shown.
  • The fragmentation of molecular cloud cores a factor of 1.1 denser than the critical Bonnor-Ebert sphere is examined though three-dimensional numerical simulations. A nested grid is employed to resolve fine structure down to 1 AU while following the entire structure of the molecular cloud core of radius 0.14 pc. A total of 225 models are shown to survey the effects of initial rotation speed, rotation law, and amplitude of bar mode perturbation. The simulations show that the cloud fragments whenever the cloud rotates sufficiently slowly to allow collapse but fast enough to form a disk before first-core formation. The latter condition is equivalent to $\Omega_0 t_{\rm ff} \gtrsim 0.05$, where $\Omega_0$ and $t_{\rm ff}$ denote the initial central angular velocity and the freefall time measured from the central density, respectively. Fragmentation is classified into six types: disk-bar, ring-bar, satellite, bar, ring, and dumbbell types according to the morphology of collapse and fragmentation. When the outward decrease in initial angular velocity is more steep, the cloud deforms from spherical at an early stage. The cloud deforms into a ring only when the bar mode m = 2 perturbation is very minor. The ring fragments into two or three fragments via ring-bar type fragmentation and into at least three fragments via ring type fragmentation. When the bar mode is significant, the cloud fragments into two fragments via either bar or dumbbell type fragmentation. These fragments eventually merge due to their low angular momenta, after which several new fragments form around the merged fragment via satellite type fragmentation.
  • We present a numerical method for solving the Poisson equation on a nested grid. The nested grid consists of uniform grids having different grid spacing and is designed to cover the space closer to the center with a finer grid. Thus our numerical method is suitable for computing the gravity of a centrally condensed object. It consists of two parts: the difference scheme for the Poisson equation on the nested grid and the multi-grid iteration algorithm. It has three advantages: accuracy, fast convergence, and scalability. First it computes the gravitational potential of a close binary accurately up to the quadraple moment, even when the binary is resolved only in the fine grids. Second residual decreases by a factor of 300 or more by each iteration. We confirmed experimentally that the iteration converges always to the exact solution of the difference equation. Third the computation load of the iteration is proportional to the total number of the cells in the nested grid. Thus our method gives a good solution at the minimum expense when the nested grid is large. The difference scheme is applicable also to the adaptive mesh refinement in which cells of different sizes are used to cover a domain of computation.
  • We investigate stability of Toomre-Hayashi model for a self-gravitating, rotating gas disk. The rotation velocity, $ v_\phi $, and sound speed, $ c _{\rm s} $, are spatially constant in the model. We show that the model is unstable against an axisymmetric perturbation irrespectively of the values of $ v_\phi $ and $ c_{\rm s} $. When the ratio, $ v_\phi / c_{\rm s} $, is large, the model disk is geometrically thin and unstable against an axisymmetric perturbation having a short radial wavelength, i.e., unstable against fragmentation. When $ v_\phi / c_{\rm s} $ is smaller than 1.20, it is unstable against total collapse. Toomre-Hayashi model of $ 1.7 \la v_\phi / c_{\rm s} \la 3 $ was thought to be stable against axisymmetric perturbations in earlier studies in which only radial motion was taken into account. Thus, the instability of Toomre-Hayashi model having a medium $ v_\phi / c_{\rm s} $ is due to not change in the surface density but that in the disk height. We also find that the singular isothermal perturbation is stable against non-spherical peturbations.