• The Extragalactic Background Light (EBL) captures the total integrated emission from stars and galaxies throughout the cosmic history. The amplitude of the near-infrared EBL from space absolute photometry observations has been controversial and depends strongly on the modeling and subtraction of the Zodiacal light foreground. We report the first measurement of the diffuse background spectrum at 0.8-1.7 um from the CIBER experiment. The observations were obtained with an absolute spectrometer over two flights in multiple sky fields to enable the subtraction of Zodiacal light, stars, terrestrial emission, and diffuse Galactic light. After subtracting foregrounds and accounting for systematic errors, we find the nominal EBL brightness, assuming the Kelsall Zodiacal light model, is 42.7+11.9/-10.6 nW/m2/sr at 1.4 um. We also analyzed the data using the Wright Zodiacal light model, which results in a worse statistical fit to the data and an unphysical EBL, falling below the known background light from galaxies at <1.3 um. Using a model-independent analysis based on the minimum EBL brightness, we find an EBL brightness of 28.7+5.1/-3.3 nW/m2/sr at 1.4 um. While the derived EBL amplitude strongly depends on the Zodiacal light model, we find that we cannot fit the spectral data to Zodiacal light, Galactic emission, and EBL from solely integrated galactic light from galaxy counts. The results require a new diffuse component, such as an additional foreground or an excess EBL with a redder spectrum than that of Zodiacal light.
  • We present near-infrared (0.8-1.8 $\mu$m) spectra of 105 bright (${m_{J}}$ $<$ 10) stars observed with the low resolution spectrometer on the rocket-borne Cosmic Infrared Background Experiment (CIBER). As our observations are performed above the earth's atmosphere, our spectra are free from telluric contamination, which makes them a unique resource for near-infrared spectral calibration. Two-Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) photometry information is used to identify cross-matched stars after reduction and extraction of the spectra. We identify the spectral types of the observed stars by comparing them with spectral templates from the Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) library. All the observed spectra are consistent with late F to M stellar spectral types, and we identify various infrared absorption lines.
  • Extragalactic background light (EBL) anisotropy traces variations in the total production of photons over cosmic history, and may contain faint, extended components missed in galaxy point source surveys. Infrared EBL fluctuations have been attributed to primordial galaxies and black holes at the epoch of reionization (EOR), or alternately, intra-halo light (IHL) from stars tidally stripped from their parent galaxies at low redshift. We report new EBL anisotropy measurements from a specialized sounding rocket experiment at 1.1 and 1.6 micrometers. The observed fluctuations exceed the amplitude from known galaxy populations, are inconsistent with EOR galaxies and black holes, and are largely explained by IHL emission. The measured fluctuations are associated with an EBL intensity that is comparable to the background from known galaxies measured through number counts, and therefore a substantial contribution to the energy contained in photons in the cosmos.
  • Ultraviolet emission from the first generation of stars in the Universe ionized the intergalactic medium in a process which was completed by z~6; the wavelength of these photons has been redshifted by (1+z) into the near infrared today and can be measured using instruments situated above the Earth's atmosphere. First flying in February 2009, the Cosmic Infrared Background Experiment (CIBER) comprises four instruments housed in a single reusable sounding rocket borne payload. CIBER will measure spatial anisotropies in the extragalactic IR background caused by cosmological structure from the epoch of reionization using two broadband imaging instruments, make a detailed characterization of the spectral shape of the IR background using a low resolution spectrometer, and measure the absolute brightness of the Zodical light foreground with a high resolution spectrometer in each of our six science fields. This paper presents the scientific motivation for CIBER and details of its first two flights, including a review of the published scientific results from the first flight and an outlook for future reionization science with CIBER data.