• Quantum digital signatures apply quantum mechanics to the problem of guaranteeing message integrity and non-repudiation with information-theoretical security, which are complementary to the confidentiality realized by quantum key distribution. Previous experimental demonstrations have been limited to transmission distances of less than 5-km of optical fiber in a laboratory setting. Here we report the first demonstration of quantum digital signatures over installed optical fiber as well as the longest transmission link reported to date. This demonstration used a 90-km long differential phase shift quantum key distribution system to achieve approximately one signed bit per second - an increase in the signature generation rate of several orders of magnitude over previous optical fiber demonstrations.
  • We report the first Quantum key distribution (QKD) experiment over a 72 dB channel loss using superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SSPD, SNSPD) with the dark count rate (DCR) of 0.01 cps. The DCR of the SSPD, which is dominated by the blackbody radiation at room temperature, is blocked by introducing cold optical bandpass filter. We employ the differential phase shift QKD (DPS-QKD) scheme with a 1 GHz system clock rate. The quantum bit error rate (QBER) below 3 % is achieved when the length of the dispersion shifted fiber (DSF) is 336 km (72 dB loss), which is low enough to generate secure keys.
  • We propose a countermeasure against the so-call tailored bright illumination attacl dor Differential-Phase-Shift QKD (DPS-QKD). By Monitoring a rate of coincidence detection at a pair of superconducting nanowire single photon detectors (SSPDs) which is connected at each of the output ports of Bob's Mach-Zehnder interferometer, Alice and Bob can detect and defeat this kind of attack.
  • We derive the time-dependent photo-detection probability equation of a superconducting single photon detector (SSPD) to study the responsive property for a pulse train at high repetition rate. Using this equation, we analyze the characteristics of SSPDs when illuminated by bright pulses in blinding attack on a quantum key distribution (QKD). We obtain good agreement between expected values based on our equation and actual experimental values. Such a time-dependent probability analysis contributes to security analysis.
  • Quantum key distribution (QKD) offers an unconditionally secure means of communication based on the laws of quantum mechanics. Currently, a major challenge is to achieve a QKD system with a 40 dB channel loss, which is required if we are to realize global scale QKD networks using communication satellites. Here we report the first QKD experiment in which secure keys were distributed over 42 dB channel loss and 200 km of optical fibre. We employed the differential phase shift quantum key distribution (DPS-QKD) protocol implemented with a 10-GHz clock frequency, and superconducting single photon detectors (SSPD) based on NbN nanowire. The SSPD offers a very low dark count rate (a few Hz) and small timing jitter (60 ps full width at half maximum). These characteristics allowed us to construct a 10-GHz clock QKD system and thus distribute secure keys over channel loss of 42 dB. In addition, we achieved a 17 kbit/s secure key rate over 105 km of optical fibre, which is two orders of magnitude higher than the previous record, and a 12.1 bit/s secure key rate over 200 km of optical fibre, which is the longest terrestrial QKD yet demonstrated. The keys generated in our experiment are secure against both general collective attacks on individual photons and a specific collective attack on multi-photons, known as a sequential unambiguous state discrimination (USD) attack.
  • We compare the performance of various quantum key distribution (QKD) systems using a novel single-photon detector, which combines frequency up-conversion in a periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) waveguide and a silicon avalanche photodiode (APD). The comparison is based on the secure communication rate as a function of distance for three QKD protocols: the Bennett-Brassard 1984 (BB84), the Bennett, Brassard, and Mermin 1992 (BBM92), and the coherent differential phase shift keying (DPSK). We show that the up-conversion detector allows for higher communication rates and longer communication distances than the commonly used InGaAs/InP APD for all the three QKD protocols.