• The problem of optimally placing sensors under a cost constraint arises naturally in the design of industrial and commercial products, as well as in scientific experiments. We consider a relaxation of the full optimization formulation of this problem and then extend a well-established QR-based greedy algorithm for the optimal sensor placement problem without cost constraints. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this algorithm on data sets related to facial recognition, climate science, and fluid mechanics. This algorithm is scalable and often identifies sparse sensors with near optimal reconstruction performance, while dramatically reducing the overall cost of the sensors. We find that the cost-error landscape varies by application, with intuitive connections to the underlying physics. Additionally, we include experiments for various pre-processing techniques and find that a popular technique based on the singular value decomposition is often sub-optimal.
  • We consider a new class of periodic solutions to the Lugiato-Lefever equations (LLE) that govern the electromagnetic field in a microresonator cavity. Specifically, we rigorously characterize the stability and dynamics of the Jacobi elliptic function solutions of LLE and show that the dn solution is stabilized by the pumping of the microresonator. In analogy with soliton perturbation theory, we also derive a microcomb perturbation theory that allows one to consider the effects of physically realizable perturbations on the comb line stability, including effects of Raman scattering and stimulated emission. Our results are verified through full numerical simulations of the LLE cavity dynamics. The perturbation theory gives a simple analytic platform for potentially engineering new resonator designs.
  • The modified biharmonic equation is encountered in a variety of application areas, including streamfunction formulations of the Navier-Stokes equations. We develop a separation of variables representation for this equation in polar coordinates, for either the interior or exterior of a disk, and derive a new class of special functions which makes the approach stable. We discuss how these functions can be used in conjunction with fast algorithms to accelerate the solution of the modified biharmonic equation or the "bi-Helmholtz" equation in more complex geometries.
  • We present a novel integral representation for the biharmonic Dirichlet problem. To obtain the representation, the Dirichlet problem is first converted into a related Stokes problem for which the Sherman-Lauricella integral representation can be used. Not all potentials for the Dirichlet problem correspond to a potential for Stokes flow, and vice-versa, but we show that the integral representation can be augmented and modified to handle either simply or multiply connected domains. The resulting integral representation has a kernel which behaves better on domains with high curvature than existing representations. Thus, this representation results in more robust computational methods for the solution of the Dirichlet problem of the biharmonic equation and we demonstrate this with several numerical examples.
  • The dynamic mode decomposition (DMD) has become a leading tool for data-driven modeling of dynamical systems, providing a regression framework for fitting linear dynamical models to time-series measurement data. We present a simple algorithm for computing an optimized version of the DMD for data which may be collected at unevenly spaced sample times. By making use of the variable projection method for nonlinear least squares problems, the algorithm is capable of solving the underlying nonlinear optimization problem efficiently. We explore the performance of the algorithm with some numerical examples for synthetic and real data from dynamical systems and find that the resulting decomposition displays less bias in the presence of noise than standard DMD algorithms. Because of the flexibility of the algorithm, we also present some interesting new options for DMD-based analysis.
  • We present a fast, direct and adaptive Poisson solver for complex two-dimensional geometries based on potential theory and fast multipole acceleration. More precisely, the solver relies on the standard decomposition of the solution as the sum of a volume integral to account for the source distribution and a layer potential to enforce the desired boundary condition. The volume integral is computed by applying the FMM on a square box that encloses the domain of interest. For the sake of efficiency and convergence acceleration, we first extend the source distribution (the right-hand side in the Poisson equation) to the enclosing box as a $C^0$ function using a fast, boundary integral-based method. We demonstrate on multiply connected domains with irregular boundaries that this continuous extension leads to high accuracy without excessive adaptive refinement near the boundary and, as a result, to an extremely efficient "black box" fast solver.
  • We investigate the behavior of integral formulations of variable coefficient elliptic partial differential equations (PDEs) in the presence of steep internal layers. In one dimension, the equations that arise can be solved analytically and the condition numbers estimated in various L_p norms. We show that high-order accurate Nystr\"{o}m discretization leads to well-conditioned finite dimensional linear systems if and only if the discretization is both norm-preserving in a correctly chosen L_p space and adaptively refined in the internal layer.