• We build templates of rotation curves as a function of the $I-$band luminosity via the mass modeling (by the sum of a thin exponential disk and a cored halo profile) of suitably normalized, stacked data from wide samples of local spiral galaxies. We then exploit such templates to determine fundamental stellar and halo properties for a sample of about $550$ local disk-dominated galaxies with high-quality measurements of the optical radius $R_{\rm opt}$ and of the corresponding rotation velocity $V_{\rm opt}$. Specifically, we determine the stellar $M_\star$ and halo $M_{\rm H}$ masses, the halo size $R_{\rm H}$ and velocity scale ${V_{\rm H}}$, and the specific angular momenta of the stellar $j_\star$ and dark matter $j_{\rm H}$ components. We derive global scaling relationships involving such stellar and halo properties both for the individual galaxies in our sample and for their mean within bins; the latter are found to be in pleasing agreement with previous determinations by independent methods (e.g., abundance matching techniques, weak lensing observations, and individual rotation curve modeling). Remarkably, the size of our sample and the robustness of our statistical approach allow us to attain an unprecedented level of precision over an extended range of mass and velocity scales, with $1\sigma$ dispersion around the mean relationships of less than $0.1$ dex. We thus set new standard local relationships that must be reproduced by detailed physical models, that offer a basis for improving the sub-grid recipes in numerical simulations, that provide a benchmark to gauge independent observations and check for systematics, and that constitute a basic step toward the future exploitation of the spiral galaxy population as a cosmological probe.
  • Clumping and turbulence are expected to affect the matter accreted onto the outskirts of galaxy clusters. To determine their impact on the thermodynamic properties of Abell 2142 we perform an analysis of the X-ray temperature data from XMM-Newton via our SuperModel, a state-of-the-art tool for investigating the astrophysics of the intracluster medium already tested on many individual clusters (since Cavaliere et al. 2009). Using the gas density profile corrected for clumpiness derived by Tchernin et al. (2016), we find evidence for the presence of a nonthermal pressure component required to sustain gravity in the cluster outskirts of Abell 2142, that amounts to about 30% of the total pressure at the virial radius. The presence of the nonthermal component implies the gas fraction to be consistent with the universal value at the virial radius and the electron thermal pressure profile to be in good agreement with that inferred from the SZ data. Our results indicate that the presence of gas clumping and of a nonthermal pressure component are both necessary to recover the observed physical properties in the cluster outskirts. Moreover, we stress that an alternative method often exploited in the literature (included Abell 2142) to determine the temperature profile k_BT = P_e/n_e basing on a combination of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) pressure P_e and of the X-ray electron density n_e does not allow to highlight the presence of nonthermal pressure support in the cluster outskirts.
  • Clumping and turbulence are expected to affect the matter accreted onto the outskirts of galaxy clusters. To determine their impact on the thermodynamic properties of Abell 2142 we perform an analysis of the X-ray temperature data from XMM-Newton via our SuperModel, a state-of-the-art tool for investigating the astrophysics of the intracluster medium already tested on many individual clusters (since Cavaliere et al. 2009). Using the gas density profile corrected for clumpiness derived by Tchernin et al. (2016), we find evidence for the presence of a nonthermal pressure component required to sustain gravity in the cluster outskirts of Abell 2142, that amounts to about 30% of the total pressure at the virial radius. The presence of the nonthermal component implies the gas fraction to be consistent with the universal value at the virial radius and the electron thermal pressure profile to be in good agreement with that inferred from the SZ data. Our results indicate that the presence of gas clumping and of a nonthermal pressure component are both necessary to recover the observed physical properties in the cluster outskirts. Moreover, we stress that an alternative method often exploited in the literature (included Abell 2142) to determine the temperature profile k_BT = P_e/n_e basing on a combination of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) pressure P_e and of the X-ray electron density n_e does not allow to highlight the presence of nonthermal pressure support in the cluster outskirts.
  • Clumping and turbulence are expected to affect the matter accreted onto the outskirts of galaxy clusters. To determine their impact on the thermodynamic properties of Abell 2142 we perform an analysis of the X-ray temperature data from XMM-Newton via our SuperModel, a state-of-the-art tool for investigating the astrophysics of the intracluster medium already tested on many individual clusters (since Cavaliere et al. 2009). Using the gas density profile corrected for clumpiness derived by Tchernin et al. (2016), we find evidence for the presence of a nonthermal pressure component required to sustain gravity in the cluster outskirts of Abell 2142, that amounts to about 30% of the total pressure at the virial radius. The presence of the nonthermal component implies the gas fraction to be consistent with the universal value at the virial radius and the electron thermal pressure profile to be in good agreement with that inferred from the SZ data. Our results indicate that the presence of gas clumping and of a nonthermal pressure component are both necessary to recover the observed physical properties in the cluster outskirts. Moreover, we stress that an alternative method often exploited in the literature (included Abell 2142) to determine the temperature profile k_BT = P_e/n_e basing on a combination of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) pressure P_e and of the X-ray electron density n_e does not allow to highlight the presence of nonthermal pressure support in the cluster outskirts.
  • The continuity equation is developed for the stellar mass content of galaxies, and exploited to derive the stellar mass function of active and quiescent galaxies over the redshift range $z\sim 0-8$. The continuity equation requires two specific inputs gauged on observations: (i) the star formation rate functions determined on the basis of the latest UV+far-IR/sub-mm/radio measurements; (ii) average star-formation histories for individual galaxies, with different prescriptions for discs and spheroids. The continuity equation also includes a source term taking into account (dry) mergers, based on recent numerical simulations and consistent with observations. The stellar mass function derived from the continuity equation is coupled with the halo mass function and with the SFR functions to derive the star formation efficiency and the main sequence of star-forming galaxies via the abundance matching technique. A remarkable agreement of the resulting stellar mass function for active and quiescent galaxies, of the galaxy main sequence and of the star-formation efficiency with current observations is found; the comparison with data also allows to robustly constrain the characteristic timescales for star formation and quiescence of massive galaxies, the star formation history of their progenitors, and the amount of stellar mass added by in-situ star formation vs. that contributed by external merger events. The continuity equation is shown to yield quantitative outcomes that must be complied by detailed physical models, that can provide a basis to improve the (sub-grid) physical recipes implemented in theoretical approaches and numerical simulations, and that can offer a benchmark for forecasts on future observations with multi-band coverage, as it will become routinely achievable in the era of JWST.
  • (abridged) We explore the Frontier Fields cluster MACS J0416.1-2403 at z=0.3972 with VIMOS/VLT spectroscopy from the CLASH-VLT survey covering a region which corresponds to almost three virial radii. We measure fluxes of 5 emission lines of 76 cluster members enabling us to unambiguously derive O/H gas metallicities, and also SFRs from Halpha. For intermediate massses we find a similar distribution of cluster and field galaxies in the MZR and mass vs. sSFR diagrams. Bulge-dominated cluster galaxies have on average lower sSFRs and higher O/Hs compared to their disk-dominated counterparts. We use the location of galaxies in the projected velocity vs. position phase-space to separate our cluster sample into a region of objects accreted longer time ago and a region of recently accreted and infalling galaxies. We find a higher fraction of accreted metal-rich galaxies (63%) compared to the fraction of 28% of metal-rich galaxies in the infalling regions. Intermediate mass galaxies falling into the cluster for the first time are found to be in agreement with predictions of the fundamental metallicity relation. In contrast, for already accreted star-forming galaxies of similar masses, we find on average metallicities higher than predicted by the models. This trend is intensified for accreted cluster galaxies of the lowest mass bin, that display metallicities 2-3 times higher than predicted by models with primordial gas inflow. Environmental effects therefore strongly influence gas regulations and control gas metallicities of log(M/Msun)<10.2 (Salpeter IMF) cluster galaxies. We also investigate chemical evolutionary paths of model galaxies with and without inflow of gas showing that strangulation is needed to explain the higher metallicities of accreted cluster galaxies. Our results favor a strangulation scenario in which gas inflow stops for log(M/Msun)<10.2 galaxies when accreted by the cluster.
  • We provide a novel, unifying physical interpretation on the origin, the average shape, the scatter, and the cosmic evolution for the main sequences of starforming galaxies and active galactic nuclei at high redshift z $\gtrsim$ 1. We achieve this goal in a model-independent way by exploiting: (i) the redshift-dependent SFR functions based on the latest UV/far-IR data from HST/Herschel, and re- lated statistics of strong gravitationally lensed sources; (ii) deterministic evolutionary tracks for the history of star formation and black hole accretion, gauged on a wealth of multiwavelength observations including the observed Eddington ratio distribution. We further validate these ingredients by showing their consistency with the observed galaxy stellar mass functions and AGN bolometric luminosity functions at different redshifts via the continuity equation approach. Our analysis of the main sequence for high-redshift galaxies and AGNs highlights that the present data are consistently interpreted in terms of an in situ coevolution scenario for star formation and black hole accretion, envisaging these as local, time coordinated processes.
  • We provide a novel, unifying physical interpretation on the origin, the average shape, the scatter, and the cosmic evolution for the main sequences of starforming galaxies and active galactic nuclei at high redshift z $\gtrsim$ 1. We achieve this goal in a model-independent way by exploiting: (i) the redshift-dependent SFR functions based on the latest UV/far-IR data from HST/Herschel, and re- lated statistics of strong gravitationally lensed sources; (ii) deterministic evolutionary tracks for the history of star formation and black hole accretion, gauged on a wealth of multiwavelength observations including the observed Eddington ratio distribution. We further validate these ingredients by showing their consistency with the observed galaxy stellar mass functions and AGN bolometric luminosity functions at different redshifts via the continuity equation approach. Our analysis of the main sequence for high-redshift galaxies and AGNs highlights that the present data are consistently interpreted in terms of an in situ coevolution scenario for star formation and black hole accretion, envisaging these as local, time coordinated processes.
  • We provide a novel, unifying physical interpretation on the origin, the average shape, the scatter, and the cosmic evolution for the main sequences of starforming galaxies and active galactic nuclei at high redshift z $\gtrsim$ 1. We achieve this goal in a model-independent way by exploiting: (i) the redshift-dependent SFR functions based on the latest UV/far-IR data from HST/Herschel, and re- lated statistics of strong gravitationally lensed sources; (ii) deterministic evolutionary tracks for the history of star formation and black hole accretion, gauged on a wealth of multiwavelength observations including the observed Eddington ratio distribution. We further validate these ingredients by showing their consistency with the observed galaxy stellar mass functions and AGN bolometric luminosity functions at different redshifts via the continuity equation approach. Our analysis of the main sequence for high-redshift galaxies and AGNs highlights that the present data are consistently interpreted in terms of an in situ coevolution scenario for star formation and black hole accretion, envisaging these as local, time coordinated processes.
  • The PAMELA space experiment, in orbit since 2006, has measured cosmic rays through the most recent A < 0 solar minimum activity period. During this entire time, galactic electrons and protons have been detected down to 70 MV and 400 MV, respectively, and their differential intensity variation in time has been monitored with unprecedented accuracy. These observations are used to show how differently electrons and protons responded to the quiet modulation conditions that prevailed from 2006 to 2009. It is well known that particle drifts, as one of four major mechanisms for the solar modulation of cosmic rays, cause charge-sign dependent solar modulation. Solar minimum activity periods provide optimal conditions to study these drift effects. The observed behaviour is compared to the solutions of a three-dimensional model for cosmic rays in the heliosphere, including drifts. The numerical results confirm that the difference in the evolution of electron and proton spectra during the last prolonged solar minimum is attributed to a large extent to particle drifts. We therefore present new evidence of charge-sign dependent solar modulation, with perspective on its peculiarities for the observed period from 2006 to 2009.
  • In an effort to derive temperature based criteria of habitability for multicellular life, we investigated the thermal limits of terrestrial poikilotherms, i.e. organisms whose body temperature and the functioning of all vital processes is directly affected by the ambient temperature. Multicellular poikilotherms are the most common and evolutionarily ancient form of complex life on earth. The thermal limits for their active metabolism and reproduction are bracketed by the temperature interval 0C<T<50C. The same interval applies to the photosynthetic production of oxygen, an essential ingredient of complex life, and for the generation of atmospheric biosignatures. Analysis of the main mechanisms responsible for the thermal thresholds of terrestrial life suggests that the same mechanisms would apply to other forms of chemical life. We propose a habitability index for complex life, h050, representing the mean orbital fraction of planetary surface that satisfies the temperature limits 0C<T<50C. With the aid of a climate model tailored for the calculation of the surface temperature of Earth-like planets, we calculated h050 as a function of planet insolation S, and atmospheric columnar mass Natm, for a few earth-like atmospheric compositions. By displaying h050 as a function of S and Natm, we built up an atmospheric mass habitable zone (AMHZ) for complex life. At variance with the classic habitable zone, the inner edge of the complex life HZ is not affected by the uncertainties inherent to the calculation of the runaway greenhouse limit. The complex life HZ is significantly narrower than the HZ of dry planets. Our calculations illustrate how changes in ambient conditions dependent on S and Natm, such as temperature excursions and surface dose of secondary particles of cosmic rays, may influence the type of life potentially present at different epochs of planetary evolution inside the AMHZ.
  • Galaxy groups differ from clusters primarily by way of their lower masses, M~10^14 M_sun vs. M~10^15 M_sun. We discuss how mass affects the thermal state of the intracluster or the intragroup medium, specifically as to their entropy levels and radial profiles. We show that entropy is produced in both cases by the continuing inflow of intergalactic gas across the system boundary into the gravitational potential well. The inflow is highly supersonic in clusters, but weakly so in groups. The former condition implies strong accretion shocks with substantial conversion of a large inflow kinetic into thermal energy, whereas the latter condition implies less effective conversion of lower energies. These features produce a conspicuous difference in entropy deposition at the current boundary. Thereafter, adiabatic compression of the hot gas into the potential well converts such time histories into radial profiles throughout a cluster or a group. In addition, in both cases a location of the system at low z in the accelerating universe or in a poor environment will starve out the inflow and the entropy production, and produce flattening or even bending down of the outer profile. We analyze in detail the sharp evidence provided by the two groups ESO 3060170 and RXJ1159+5531 that have been recently observed in X rays out to their virial radii, and find a close and detailed match with our expectations.
  • We exploit the continuity equation approach and the `main sequence' star-formation timescales to show that the observed high abundance of galaxies with stellar masses > a few 10^10 M_sun at redshift z>4 implies the existence of a galaxy population featuring large star formation rates (SFRs) > 10^2 M_sun/yr in heavily dust-obscured conditions. These galaxies constitute the high-redshift counterparts of the dusty star-forming population already surveyed for z<3 in the far-IR band by the Herschel space observatory. We work out specific predictions for the evolution of the corresponding stellar mass and SFR functions out to z~10, elucidating that the number density at z<8 for SFRs >30 M_sun/yr cannot be estimated relying on the UV luminosity function alone, even when standard corrections for dust extinction based on the UV slope are applied. We compute the number counts and redshift distributions (including galaxy-scale gravitational lensing) of this galaxy population, and show that current data from AzTEC-LABOCA, SCUBA-2 and ALMA-SPT surveys are already digging into it. We substantiate how an observational strategy based on a color preselection in the far-IR or (sub-)mm band with Herschel and SCUBA-2, supplemented by photometric data via on-source observations with ALMA, can allow to reconstruct the bright end of the SFR functions out to z~8. In parallel, such a challenging task can be managed by exploiting current UV surveys in combination with (sub-)mm observations by ALMA and NIKA2 and/or radio observations by SKA and its precursors.
  • We exploit the continuity equation approach and the `main sequence' star-formation timescales to show that the observed high abundance of galaxies with stellar masses > a few 10^10 M_sun at redshift z>4 implies the existence of a galaxy population featuring large star formation rates (SFRs) > 10^2 M_sun/yr in heavily dust-obscured conditions. These galaxies constitute the high-redshift counterparts of the dusty star-forming population already surveyed for z<3 in the far-IR band by the Herschel space observatory. We work out specific predictions for the evolution of the corresponding stellar mass and SFR functions out to z~10, elucidating that the number density at z<8 for SFRs >30 M_sun/yr cannot be estimated relying on the UV luminosity function alone, even when standard corrections for dust extinction based on the UV slope are applied. We compute the number counts and redshift distributions (including galaxy-scale gravitational lensing) of this galaxy population, and show that current data from AzTEC-LABOCA, SCUBA-2 and ALMA-SPT surveys are already digging into it. We substantiate how an observational strategy based on a color preselection in the far-IR or (sub-)mm band with Herschel and SCUBA-2, supplemented by photometric data via on-source observations with ALMA, can allow to reconstruct the bright end of the SFR functions out to z~8. In parallel, such a challenging task can be managed by exploiting current UV surveys in combination with (sub-)mm observations by ALMA and NIKA2 and/or radio observations by SKA and its precursors.
  • We exploit the continuity equation approach and the `main sequence' star-formation timescales to show that the observed high abundance of galaxies with stellar masses > a few 10^10 M_sun at redshift z>4 implies the existence of a galaxy population featuring large star formation rates (SFRs) > 10^2 M_sun/yr in heavily dust-obscured conditions. These galaxies constitute the high-redshift counterparts of the dusty star-forming population already surveyed for z<3 in the far-IR band by the Herschel space observatory. We work out specific predictions for the evolution of the corresponding stellar mass and SFR functions out to z~10, elucidating that the number density at z<8 for SFRs >30 M_sun/yr cannot be estimated relying on the UV luminosity function alone, even when standard corrections for dust extinction based on the UV slope are applied. We compute the number counts and redshift distributions (including galaxy-scale gravitational lensing) of this galaxy population, and show that current data from AzTEC-LABOCA, SCUBA-2 and ALMA-SPT surveys are already digging into it. We substantiate how an observational strategy based on a color preselection in the far-IR or (sub-)mm band with Herschel and SCUBA-2, supplemented by photometric data via on-source observations with ALMA, can allow to reconstruct the bright end of the SFR functions out to z~8. In parallel, such a challenging task can be managed by exploiting current UV surveys in combination with (sub-)mm observations by ALMA and NIKA2 and/or radio observations by SKA and its precursors.
  • We study the soft excess variability of the narrow line Seyfert 1 galaxy IRAS 13224-3809. We considered all five archival XMM-Newton observations, and we applied the 'flux-flux plot' (FFP) method. We found that the flux-flux plots were highly affected by the choice of the light curves' time bin size, most probably because of the fast and large amplitude variations, and the intrinsic non-linear flux--flux relations in this source. Therefore, we recommend that the smallest bin-size should be used in such cases. Hence, We constructed FFPs in 11 energy bands below 1.7 keV, and we considered the 1.7-3 keV band, as being representative of the primary emission. The FFPs are reasonably well fitted by a 'power-law plus a constant' model. We detected significant positive constants in three out of five observations. The best-fit slopes are flatter than unity at energies below $\sim 0.9$ keV, where the soft excess is strongest. This suggests the presence of intrinsic spectral variability. A power-law-like primary component, which is variable in flux and spectral slope (as $\Gamma\propto N_{\rm PL}^{0.1}$) and a soft-excess component, which varies with the primary continuum (as $F_{\rm excess}\propto F_{\rm primary}^{0.46}$), can broadly explain the FFPs. In fact, this can create positive `constants', even when a stable spectral component does not exist. Nevertheless, the possibility of a stable, soft--band constant component cannot be ruled out, but its contribution to the observed 0.2-1 keV band flux should be less than $\sim 15$ %. The model constants in the FFPs were consistent with zero in one observation, and negative at energies below 1 keV in another. It is hard to explain these results in the context of any spectral variability scenario, but they may signify the presence of a variable, warm absorber in the source.
  • Dark matter constitutes the great majority of the matter content in the Universe, but its microscopic nature remains an intriguing mystery, with profound implications for particle physics, astrophysics and cosmology. Here we shed light on the longstanding issue of whether the dark matter is warm or cold by combining the measurements of the galaxy luminosity functions out to high redshifts z~10 from the Hubble Space Telescope with the recent cosmological data on the reionization history of the Universe from the Planck mission. We derive robust and tight bounds on the mass of warm dark matter particle, finding that the current data require it to be in the narrow range between 2 and 3 keV. In addition, we show that a mass not exceeding 3 keV is also concurrently indicated by astrophysical constraints related to the local number of satellites in Milky Way-sized galaxies, though it is in marginal tension with analysis of the Lyman-alpha forest. For warm dark matter masses above 3 keV as well as for cold dark matter, to satisfy the Planck constraints on the optical depth and not to run into the satellite problem would require invoking astrophysical processes that inhibit galaxy formation in halos with mass M_H< a few 10^8 M_sun, corresponding to a limiting UV magnitude M_UV~-11. Anyway, we predict a downturn of the galaxy luminosity function at z~8 faintward of M_UV~-12, and stress that its detailed shape is extremely informative both on particle physics and on the astrophysics of galaxy formation in small halos. These expectations will be tested via the Hubble Frontier Fields and with the advent of the James Webb Space Telescope, which will enable probing the very faint end of the galaxy luminosity function out to z~8-10.
  • Dark matter constitutes the great majority of the matter content in the Universe, but its microscopic nature remains an intriguing mystery, with profound implications for particle physics, astrophysics and cosmology. Here we shed light on the longstanding issue of whether the dark matter is warm or cold by combining the measurements of the galaxy luminosity functions out to high redshifts z~10 from the Hubble Space Telescope with the recent cosmological data on the reionization history of the Universe from the Planck mission. We derive robust and tight bounds on the mass of warm dark matter particle, finding that the current data require it to be in the narrow range between 2 and 3 keV. In addition, we show that a mass not exceeding 3 keV is also concurrently indicated by astrophysical constraints related to the local number of satellites in Milky Way-sized galaxies, though it is in marginal tension with analysis of the Lyman-alpha forest. For warm dark matter masses above 3 keV as well as for cold dark matter, to satisfy the Planck constraints on the optical depth and not to run into the satellite problem would require invoking astrophysical processes that inhibit galaxy formation in halos with mass M_H< a few 10^8 M_sun, corresponding to a limiting UV magnitude M_UV~-11. Anyway, we predict a downturn of the galaxy luminosity function at z~8 faintward of M_UV~-12, and stress that its detailed shape is extremely informative both on particle physics and on the astrophysics of galaxy formation in small halos. These expectations will be tested via the Hubble Frontier Fields and with the advent of the James Webb Space Telescope, which will enable probing the very faint end of the galaxy luminosity function out to z~8-10.
  • Dark matter constitutes the great majority of the matter content in the Universe, but its microscopic nature remains an intriguing mystery, with profound implications for particle physics, astrophysics and cosmology. Here we shed light on the longstanding issue of whether the dark matter is warm or cold by combining the measurements of the galaxy luminosity functions out to high redshifts z~10 from the Hubble Space Telescope with the recent cosmological data on the reionization history of the Universe from the Planck mission. We derive robust and tight bounds on the mass of warm dark matter particle, finding that the current data require it to be in the narrow range between 2 and 3 keV. In addition, we show that a mass not exceeding 3 keV is also concurrently indicated by astrophysical constraints related to the local number of satellites in Milky Way-sized galaxies, though it is in marginal tension with analysis of the Lyman-alpha forest. For warm dark matter masses above 3 keV as well as for cold dark matter, to satisfy the Planck constraints on the optical depth and not to run into the satellite problem would require invoking astrophysical processes that inhibit galaxy formation in halos with mass M_H< a few 10^8 M_sun, corresponding to a limiting UV magnitude M_UV~-11. Anyway, we predict a downturn of the galaxy luminosity function at z~8 faintward of M_UV~-12, and stress that its detailed shape is extremely informative both on particle physics and on the astrophysics of galaxy formation in small halos. These expectations will be tested via the Hubble Frontier Fields and with the advent of the James Webb Space Telescope, which will enable probing the very faint end of the galaxy luminosity function out to z~8-10.
  • [abridged] We investigate the coevolution of galaxies and hosted supermassive black holes throughout the history of the Universe by a statistical approach based on the continuity equation and the abundance matching technique. Specifically, we present analytical solutions of the continuity equation without source term to reconstruct the supermassive black hole (BH) mass function from the AGN luminosity functions. Such an approach includes physically-motivated AGN lightcurves tested on independent datasets, which describe the evolution of the Eddington ratio and radiative efficiency from slim- to thin-disc conditions. We nicely reproduce the local estimates of the BH mass function, the AGN duty cycle as a function of mass and redshift, along with the Eddington ratio function and the fraction of galaxies with given stellar mass hosting an AGN with given Eddington ratio. We exploit the same approach to reconstruct the observed stellar mass function at different redshift from the UV and far-IR luminosity functions associated to star formation in galaxies. These results imply that the buildup of stars and BHs in galaxies occurs via in-situ processes, with dry mergers playing a marginal role at least for stellar masses < 3 10^11 M_sun and BH masses < 10^9 M_sun, where the statistical data are more secure and less biased by systematic errors. In addition, we develop an improved abundance matching technique to link the stellar and BH content of galaxies to the gravitationally dominant dark matter component. The resulting relationships constitute a testbed for galaxy evolution models, highlighting the complementary role of stellar and AGN feedback in the star formation process. Finally, the clustering properties of BHs and galaxies are found to be in full agreement with current observations, so further validating our results from the continuity equation.
  • [abridged] We investigate the coevolution of galaxies and hosted supermassive black holes throughout the history of the Universe by a statistical approach based on the continuity equation and the abundance matching technique. Specifically, we present analytical solutions of the continuity equation without source term to reconstruct the supermassive black hole (BH) mass function from the AGN luminosity functions. Such an approach includes physically-motivated AGN lightcurves tested on independent datasets, which describe the evolution of the Eddington ratio and radiative efficiency from slim- to thin-disc conditions. We nicely reproduce the local estimates of the BH mass function, the AGN duty cycle as a function of mass and redshift, along with the Eddington ratio function and the fraction of galaxies with given stellar mass hosting an AGN with given Eddington ratio. We exploit the same approach to reconstruct the observed stellar mass function at different redshift from the UV and far-IR luminosity functions associated to star formation in galaxies. These results imply that the buildup of stars and BHs in galaxies occurs via in-situ processes, with dry mergers playing a marginal role at least for stellar masses < 3 10^11 M_sun and BH masses < 10^9 M_sun, where the statistical data are more secure and less biased by systematic errors. In addition, we develop an improved abundance matching technique to link the stellar and BH content of galaxies to the gravitationally dominant dark matter component. The resulting relationships constitute a testbed for galaxy evolution models, highlighting the complementary role of stellar and AGN feedback in the star formation process. Finally, the clustering properties of BHs and galaxies are found to be in full agreement with current observations, so further validating our results from the continuity equation.
  • [abridged] We investigate the coevolution of galaxies and hosted supermassive black holes throughout the history of the Universe by a statistical approach based on the continuity equation and the abundance matching technique. Specifically, we present analytical solutions of the continuity equation without source term to reconstruct the supermassive black hole (BH) mass function from the AGN luminosity functions. Such an approach includes physically-motivated AGN lightcurves tested on independent datasets, which describe the evolution of the Eddington ratio and radiative efficiency from slim- to thin-disc conditions. We nicely reproduce the local estimates of the BH mass function, the AGN duty cycle as a function of mass and redshift, along with the Eddington ratio function and the fraction of galaxies with given stellar mass hosting an AGN with given Eddington ratio. We exploit the same approach to reconstruct the observed stellar mass function at different redshift from the UV and far-IR luminosity functions associated to star formation in galaxies. These results imply that the buildup of stars and BHs in galaxies occurs via in-situ processes, with dry mergers playing a marginal role at least for stellar masses < 3 10^11 M_sun and BH masses < 10^9 M_sun, where the statistical data are more secure and less biased by systematic errors. In addition, we develop an improved abundance matching technique to link the stellar and BH content of galaxies to the gravitationally dominant dark matter component. The resulting relationships constitute a testbed for galaxy evolution models, highlighting the complementary role of stellar and AGN feedback in the star formation process. Finally, the clustering properties of BHs and galaxies are found to be in full agreement with current observations, so further validating our results from the continuity equation.
  • We present an analysis of high-quality X-ray data out to the virial radius for the two galaxy clusters Abell 1246 and GMBCG J255.34805+64.23661 (J255) by means of our entropy-based SuperModel. For Abell 1246 we find that the spherically-averaged entropy profile of the intracluster medium (ICM) progressively flattens outwards, and that a nonthermal pressure component amounting to ~20% of the total is required to support hydrostatic equilibrium in the outskirts; there we also estimate a modest value C~1.6 of the ICM clumping factor. These findings agree with previous analyses on other cool-core, relaxed clusters, and lend further support to the picture by Lapi et al. (2010) that relates the entropy flattening, the development of nonthermal pressure component, and the azimuthal variation of ICM properties to weakening boundary shocks. In this scenario clusters are born in a high-entropy state throughout, and are expected to develop on similar timescales a low entropy state both at the center due to cooling, and in the outskirts due to weakening shocks. However, the analysis of J255 testifies how such a typical evolutionary course can be interrupted or even reversed by merging especially at intermediate redshift, as predicted by Cavaliere et al. (2011b). In fact, a merger has rejuvenated the ICM of this cluster at z~0.45 by reestablishing a high entropy state in the outskirts, while leaving intact or erasing only partially the low-entropy, cool core at the center.
  • We present an analysis of high-quality X-ray data out to the virial radius for the two galaxy clusters Abell 1246 and GMBCG J255.34805+64.23661 (J255) by means of our entropy-based SuperModel. For Abell 1246 we find that the spherically-averaged entropy profile of the intracluster medium (ICM) progressively flattens outwards, and that a nonthermal pressure component amounting to ~20% of the total is required to support hydrostatic equilibrium in the outskirts; there we also estimate a modest value C~1.6 of the ICM clumping factor. These findings agree with previous analyses on other cool-core, relaxed clusters, and lend further support to the picture by Lapi et al. (2010) that relates the entropy flattening, the development of nonthermal pressure component, and the azimuthal variation of ICM properties to weakening boundary shocks. In this scenario clusters are born in a high-entropy state throughout, and are expected to develop on similar timescales a low entropy state both at the center due to cooling, and in the outskirts due to weakening shocks. However, the analysis of J255 testifies how such a typical evolutionary course can be interrupted or even reversed by merging especially at intermediate redshift, as predicted by Cavaliere et al. (2011b). In fact, a merger has rejuvenated the ICM of this cluster at z~0.45 by reestablishing a high entropy state in the outskirts, while leaving intact or erasing only partially the low-entropy, cool core at the center.
  • We present an analysis of high-quality X-ray data out to the virial radius for the two galaxy clusters Abell 1246 and GMBCG J255.34805+64.23661 (J255) by means of our entropy-based SuperModel. For Abell 1246 we find that the spherically-averaged entropy profile of the intracluster medium (ICM) progressively flattens outwards, and that a nonthermal pressure component amounting to ~20% of the total is required to support hydrostatic equilibrium in the outskirts; there we also estimate a modest value C~1.6 of the ICM clumping factor. These findings agree with previous analyses on other cool-core, relaxed clusters, and lend further support to the picture by Lapi et al. (2010) that relates the entropy flattening, the development of nonthermal pressure component, and the azimuthal variation of ICM properties to weakening boundary shocks. In this scenario clusters are born in a high-entropy state throughout, and are expected to develop on similar timescales a low entropy state both at the center due to cooling, and in the outskirts due to weakening shocks. However, the analysis of J255 testifies how such a typical evolutionary course can be interrupted or even reversed by merging especially at intermediate redshift, as predicted by Cavaliere et al. (2011b). In fact, a merger has rejuvenated the ICM of this cluster at z~0.45 by reestablishing a high entropy state in the outskirts, while leaving intact or erasing only partially the low-entropy, cool core at the center.