• Recent Kepler photometry has revealed that about half of white dwarfs (WDs) have periodic, low-level (~ 1e-4 - 1e-3), optical variations. Hubble Space Telescope (HST) ultraviolet spectroscopy has shown that up to about one half of WDs are actively accreting rocky planetary debris, as evidenced by the presence of photospheric metal absorption lines. We have obtained HST ultraviolet spectra of seven WDs that have been monitored for periodic variations, to test the hypothesis that these two phenomena are causally connected, i.e. that the optical periodic modulation is caused by WD rotation coupled with an inhomogeneous surface distribution of accreted metals. We detect photospheric metals in four out of the seven WDs. However, we find no significant correspondence between the existence of optical periodic variability and the detection of photospheric ultraviolet absorption lines. Thus the null hypothesis stands, that the two phenomena are not directly related. Some other source of WD surface inhomogeneity, perhaps related to magnetic field strength, combined with the WD rotation, or alternatively effects due to close binary companions, may be behind the observed optical modulation. We report the marginal detection of molecular hydrogen in WD J1949+4734, only the fourth known WD with detected H_2 lines. We also re-classify J1926+4219 as a carbon-rich He-sdO subdwarf.
  • The radial velocity (RV) of a single star is easily obtained from cross-correlation of the spectrum with a template, but the treatment of double-lined spectroscopic binaries (SB2s) is more difficult. Two different approaches were applied to a set of SB2s: the fit of the cross-correlation function with two normal distributions, and the cross-correlation with two templates, derived with the TODCOR code. It appears that the minimum masses obtained through the two methods are sometimes rather different, although their estimated uncertainties are roughly equal. Moreover, both methods induce a shift in the zero point of the secondary RVs, but it is less pronounced for TODCOR. All-in-all the comparison between the two methods is in favour of TODCOR.
  • Accurate stellar masses are requested in order to improve our understanding of stellar interiors, but they are still rather rare. Fortunately, the forthcoming Gaia Mission will provide astrometric measurements permitting the derivation of the orbital inclinations of nearby binaries which are also observed as double-lined spectroscopic binaries (SB2s) with ground-based telescopes. A programme of radial velocity (RV) measurements was initiated in 2010 with the Sophie spectrograph of the Haute-Provence observatory in order to derive accurate SB2 orbits for a large set of stars. Therefore, combined SB2+astrometric orbits will be derived thanks to Gaia, and masses with errors around 1~\% are expected for both components. The programme includes 70 SB2s, and the accurate SB2 orbits of 24 of them were already derived. In addition, two complementary programmes devoted to southern stars or to late-type dwarf stars were also initiated with the HERMES and the CARMENES spectrographs, respectively. Interferometric measurements were obained with the VLTI/PIONIER for 7 SB2s, and were taken from other sources for 4 others. Currently, combined "visual binary" (VB) +SB2 solutions were derived for 7 binaries, leading to the masses of the components and to the parallaxes. The parallaxes from the Hipparcos 2 catalogue were corrected for orbital motion and compared to our solution, confirming the high quality of Hipparcos 2.
  • We developed a novel direct algorithm to derive the mass-ratio distribution (MRD) of short-period binaries from an observed sample of single-lined spectroscopic binaries (SB1). The algorithm considers a class of parameterized MRDs and finds the set of parameters that best fits the observed sample. The algorithm consists of four parts. First, we define a new observable, the `modified mass function', that can be calculated for each binary in the sample. We show that the distribution of the modified mass function follows the shape of the underlying MRD, turning it more advantageous than the previously used mass function, reduced mass function or reduced mass function logarithm. Second, we derive the likelihood of the sample of modified mass functions to be observed given an assumed MRD. An MCMC search enables the algorithm to find the parameters that best fit the observations. Third, we suggest to express the unknown MRD by a linear combination of a basis of functions that spans the possible MRDs. We suggest two such bases. Fourth, we show how to account for the undetected systems that have an RV amplitude below a certain threshold. Without the correction, this observational bias suppresses the derived MRD for low mass ratios. Numerous simulations show that the algorithm works well with either of the two suggested bases. The four parts of the algorithm are independent, but the combination of the four turn the algorithm to be highly effective in deriving the MRD of the binary population.
  • The eShel, an off-the-shelf, fiber-fed echelle spectrograph ($R \approx 10,000$), was installed on the 1m telescope at the Wise observatory in Israel. We report the installation of the multi-order spectrograph, and describe our pipeline to extract stellar radial velocity from the obtained spectra. We also introduce a new algorithm---UNICOR, to remove radial-velocity systematics that can appear in some of the observed orders. We show that the system performance is close to the photon-noise limit for exposures with more than $10^7$ counts, with a precision that can get better than 200 m/s for F--K stars, for which the eShel spectral response is optimal. This makes the eShel at Wise a useful tool for studying spectroscopic binaries brighter than $m_V=11$. We demonstrate this capability with orbital solutions of two binaries from projects being performed at Wise.
  • The two most common techniques for measuring planetary masses - the radial velocity (RV) and the transit timing variations (TTVs) techniques - have been observed to yield systematically different masses for planets of similar radii. Following Steffen (2016), we consider the effects of the observational biases of the two methods as a possible cause for this difference. We find that at short orbital periods ($P<11$ day), the two methods produce statistically similar results, whereas at long periods ($P>11$ day) the RV masses are systematically higher than the TTV ones. We suggest that this is consistent with an RV detection-sensitivity bias for longer periods. On the other hand, we do find an apparently significant difference between the short and the long-period planets, obtained by both observing techniques-the mass-radius relationship parameterized as a power law has a steeper index at short periods than at long periods. We also point out another anticipated observational bias between the two techniques - multiple planet systems with derived RV masses have substantially larger period ratios than the systems with TTV mass derivation.
  • We report the detections of a giant planet (MARVELS-7b) and a brown dwarf candidate (MARVELS-7c) around the primary star in the close binary system, HD 87646. It is the first close binary system with more than one substellar circum-primary companion discovered to the best of our knowledge. The detection of this giant planet was accomplished using the first multi-object Doppler instrument (KeckET) at the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) telescope. Subsequent radial velocity observations using ET at Kitt Peak National Observatory, HRS at HET, the "Classic" spectrograph at the Automatic Spectroscopic Telescope at Fairborn Observatory, and MARVELS from SDSS-III confirmed this giant planet discovery and revealed the existence of a long-period brown dwarf in this binary. HD 87646 is a close binary with a separation of $\sim22$ AU between the two stars, estimated using the Hipparcos catalogue and our newly acquired AO image from PALAO on the 200-inch Hale Telescope at Palomar. The primary star in the binary, HD 87646A, has Teff = 5770$\pm$80K, log(g)=4.1$\pm$0.1 and [Fe/H] = $-0.17\pm0.08$. The derived minimum masses of the two substellar companions of HD 87646A are 12.4$\pm$0.7M$_{\rm Jup}$ and 57.0$\pm3.7$M$_{\rm Jup}$. The periods are 13.481$\pm$0.001 days and 674$\pm$4 days and the measured eccentricities are 0.05$\pm$0.02 and 0.50$\pm$0.02 respectively. Our dynamical simulations show the system is stable if the binary orbit has a large semi-major axis and a low eccentricity, which can be verified with future astrometry observations.
  • Kepler has discovered hundreds of systems with multiple transiting exoplanets which hold tremendous potential both individually and collectively for understanding the formation and evolution of planetary systems. Many of these systems consist of multiple small planets with periods less than ~50 days known as Systems with Tightly-spaced Inner Planets, or STIPs. One especially intriguing STIP, Kepler-80 (KOI-500), contains five transiting planets: f, d, e, b, and c with periods of 1.0, 3.1, 4.6, 7.1, 9.5 days, respectively. We provide measurements of transit times and a transit timing variation (TTV) dynamical analysis. We find that TTVs cannot reliably detect eccentricities for this system, though mass estimates are not affected. Restricting the eccentricity to a reasonable range, we infer masses for the outer four planets (d, e, b, and c) to be $6.75^{+0.69}_{-0.51}$, $4.13^{+0.81}_{-0.95}$, $6.93^{+1.05}_{-0.70}$, and $6.74^{+1.23}_{-0.86}$ Earth masses, respectively. The similar masses but different radii are consistent with terrestrial compositions for d and e and $\sim$2% H/He envelopes for b and c. We confirm that the outer four planets are in a rare dynamical configuration with four interconnected three-body resonances that are librating with few degree amplitudes. We present a formation model that can reproduce the observed configuration by starting with a multi-resonant chain and introducing dissipation. Overall, the information-rich Kepler-80 planets provide an important perspective into exoplanetary systems.
  • We present a new transit timing catalog of 2599 Kepler Objects of Interest (=KOIs), using the PDC-MAP long-cadence light curves that include the full seventeen quarters of the mission (ftp://wise- ftp.tau.ac.il/pub/tauttv/TTV/ver_112). The goal is to produce an easy-to-use catalog that can stimulate further analyses of interesting systems. For 779 KOIs with high enough SNRs, we derived the timing, duration and depth of 69,914 transits. For 1820 KOIs with lower SNR, we derived only the timing of 225,273 transits. After removal of outlier timings, we derived various statistics for each KOI that were used to indicate significant variations. Including systems found by previous works, we have detected 260 KOIs which showed significant TTVs with long-term variations (>100 day), and another fourteen KOIs with periodic modulations shorter than 100 day and small amplitudes. For five of those, the periodicity is probably due to the crossing of rotating stellar spots by the transiting planets.
  • We report the discovery of a new Kepler transiting circumbinary planet (CBP). This latest addition to the still-small family of CBPs defies the current trend of known short-period planets orbiting near the stability limit of binary stars. Unlike the previous discoveries, the planet revolving around the eclipsing binary system Kepler-1647 has a very long orbital period (~1100 days) and was at conjunction only twice during the Kepler mission lifetime. Due to the singular configuration of the system, Kepler-1647b is not only the longest-period transiting CBP at the time of writing, but also one of the longest-period transiting planets. With a radius of 1.06+/-0.01 RJup it is also the largest CBP to date. The planet produced three transits in the light-curve of Kepler-1647 (one of them during an eclipse, creating a syzygy) and measurably perturbed the times of the stellar eclipses, allowing us to measure its mass to be 1.52+/-0.65 MJup. The planet revolves around an 11-day period eclipsing binary consisting of two Solar-mass stars on a slightly inclined, mildly eccentric (e_bin = 0.16), spin-synchronized orbit. Despite having an orbital period three times longer than Earth's, Kepler-1647b is in the conservative habitable zone of the binary star throughout its orbit.
  • A few studies have reported a significant dearth of exoplanets with Neptune mass and radius with orbital periods below $2$--$4$ d. This cannot be explained by observational biases because many Neptunian planets with longer orbital periods have been detected. The existence of this desert is similar to the appearance of the so-called brown-dwarf desert that suggests different formation mechanisms of planets and stellar companions with short orbital periods. Similarly, the Neptunian desert might indicate different mechanisms of formation and evolution for hot Jupiters and short-period super-Earths. We here follow a previous study and examine the location and shape of the desert in both the period-mass and period-radius planes, using the currently available large samples of planets. The desert in the period-mass plane has a relatively sharp upper edge, with a planetary mass that is inversely proportional to the planetary orbital period, while the lower, somewhat blurred, boundary is located along masses that are apparently linearly proportional to the period. The desert in the period-radius plane of the transiting planets is less clear. It seems as if the radius along the upper boundary is inversely proportional to the period to the power of one-third, while the lower boundary shows a radius that is proportional to the period to the power of two-thirds. The combination of the two upper bounds of the desert, in the period-mass and period-radius planes, yields a planetary mass-radius relation of $R_{\rm p}/R_{\rm Jup}\simeq (1.2\pm0.3)(M_{\rm p}/M_{\rm Jup})^{0.27\pm0.11}\,$ for $ 0.1\lesssim M_{\rm p}/M_{\rm Jup}\lesssim 1$. The derived shape of the desert, which might extend up to periods of $5$--$10$ d, could shed some light on the formation and evolution of close-in planets.
  • We infer dynamical masses in eight multi-planet systems using transit times measured from Kepler's complete dataset, including short-cadence data where available. Of the eighteen dynamical masses that we infer, ten pass multiple tests for robustness. These are in systems; Kepler-26 (KOI-250), Kepler-29 (KOI-738), Kepler-60 (KOI-2086), Kepler-105 (KOI-115), and Kepler-307 (KOI-1576). Kepler-105 c has a density consistent with an Earth-like composition. Strong TTV signals were detected from additional planets, but their inferred masses were sensitive to outliers or consistent solutions could not be found with independently-measured transit times, including planets at; Kepler-49 (KOI-248), Kepler-57 (KOI-1270), Kepler-105 (KOI-115) and Kepler-177 (KOI-523). Strong upper limits on the mass of Kepler-177 c imply an extremely low density ~0.1 g cm$^{-3}$. In most cases, individual orbital eccentricities were poorly constrained due to degeneracies in TTV inversion. For five planet pairs in our sample, strong secular interactions imply a moderate-to-high likelihood of apsidal alignment over a wide range of possible eccentricities. We also find solutions for the three planets known to orbit Kepler-60 in a Laplace-like resonance chain. However, non-librating solutions also match the transit-timing data. For six systems, we calculate more precise stellar parameters than previously known, enabling useful constraints on planetary densities where we have robust mass measurements. Placing these exoplanets on the mass-radius diagram, we find a wide range of densities is observed among sub-Neptune mass planets and that the range in observed densities is anti-correlated with incident flux.
  • In anticipation of the Gaia astrometric mission, a large sample of spectroscopic binaries has been observed since 2010 with the SOPHIE spectrograph at the Haute--Provence Observatory. Our aim is to derive the orbital elements of double-lined spectroscopic binaries (SB2s) with an accuracy sufficient to finally obtain the masses of the components with relative errors as small as 1 % when the astrometric measurements of Gaia are taken into account. In this paper we present the results from five years of observations of 10 SB2 systems with periods ranging from 37 to 881 days. Using the TODMOR algorithm we computed radial velocities from the spectra, and then derived the orbital elements of these binary systems. The minimum masses of the components are then obtained with an accuracy better than 1.2 % for the ten binaries. Combining the radial velocities with existing interferometric measurements, we derived the masses of the primary and secondary components of HIP 87895 with an accuracy of 0.98 % and 1.2 % respectively.
  • The primary Kepler Mission provided nearly continuous monitoring of ~200,000 objects with unprecedented photometric precision. We present the final catalog of eclipsing binary systems within the 105 square degree Kepler field of view. This release incorporates the full extent of the data from the primary mission (Q0-Q17 Data Release). As a result, new systems have been added, additional false positives have been removed, ephemerides and principal parameters have been recomputed, classifications have been revised to rely on analytical models, and eclipse timing variations have been computed for each system. We identify several classes of systems including those that exhibit tertiary eclipse events, systems that show clear evidence of additional bodies, heartbeat systems, systems with changing eclipse depths, and systems exhibiting only one eclipse event over the duration of the mission. We have updated the period and galactic latitude distribution diagrams and included a catalog completeness evaluation. The total number of identified eclipsing and ellipsoidal binary systems in the Kepler field of view has increased to 2878, 1.3% of all observed Kepler targets. An online version of this catalog with downloadable content and visualization tools is maintained at http://keplerEBs.villanova.edu.
  • We report the discovery of four short-period eclipsing systems in the Kepler light curves, consisting of an A-star primary and a low-mass white dwarf (WD) secondary (dA+WD) - KIC 4169521, KOI-3818, KIC 2851474, and KIC 9285587. The systems show BEaming, Ellipsoidal and Reflection (BEER) phase modulations together with primary and secondary eclipses. These add to the 6 Kepler and 18 WASP short-period eclipsing dA+WD binaries that were previously known. The light curves, together with follow-up spectroscopic observations, allow us to derive the masses, radii, and effective temperatures of the two components of the four systems. The orbital periods, of 1.17-3.82 days, and WD masses, of 0.19-0.22 Msun, are similar to those of the previously known systems. The WD radii of KOI-3818, KIC 2851474, and KIC 9285587 are 0.026, 0.035, and 0.026 Rsun, respectively, the smallest WD radii derived so far for short-period eclipsing dA+WD binaries. These three binaries extend the previously known population to older systems with cooler and smaller WD secondaries. KOI-3818 displays evidence for a fast-rotating primary and a minute but significant eccentricity of ~0.0015. These features are probably the outcome of the mass-transfer process.
  • There are by now ten published detections of fast radio bursts (FRBs), single bright GHz-band millisecond pulses of unknown origin. Proposed explanations cover a broad range from exotic processes at cosmological distances to atmospheric and terrestrial sources. Loeb et al. have previously suggested that FRB sources could be nearby flare stars, and pointed out the presence of a W-UMa-type contact binary within the beam of one out of three FRB fields that they examined. Using time-domain optical photometry and spectroscopy, we now find possible flare stars in additional FRB fields, with one to three such cases among eight FRB fields studied. We evaluate the chance probabilities of these possible associations to be in the range 0.1% to 9%, depending on the input assumptions. Further, we re-analyze the probability that two FRBs recently discovered 3 years apart within the same radio beam are unrelated. Contrary to other claims, we conclude with 99% confidence that the two events are from the same repeating source. The different dispersion measures between the two bursts then rule out a cosmological origin for the dispersion measure, but are consistent with the flare-star scenario with a varying plasma blanket between bursts. Finally, we review some theoretical objections that have been raised against a local flare-star FRB origin, and show that they are incorrect.
  • The Kepler mission has yielded the discovery of eight circumbinary systems, all found around eclipsing binaries with periods greater than 7 d. This is longer than the typical eclipsing binary period found by Kepler, and hence there is a dearth of planets around the closest binaries. In this paper we suggest how this dearth may be explained by the presence of a distant stellar tertiary companion, which shrunk the inner binary orbit by the process of Kozai cycles and tidal friction, a mechanism that has been implicated for producing most binaries with periods below 7 d. We show that the geometry and orbital dynamics of these evolving triple-star systems are highly restrictive for a circumbinary planet, which is subject itself to Kozai modulation, on one hand, and can shield the two inner stars from their Kozai cycle and subsequent shrinking, on the other hand. Only small planets on wide and inclined orbits may form, survive and allow for the inner binary shrinkage. Those are difficult to detect.
  • Mazeh, Holczer, and Shporer (2015) have presented an approach that can, in principle, use the derived transit timing variation (TTV) of some transiting planets observed by the $Kepler$ mission to distinguish between prograde and retrograde motion of their orbits with respect to their parent stars' rotation. The approach utilizes TTVs induced by spot-crossing events that occur when the planet moves across a spot on the stellar surface, looking for a correlation between the derived TTVs and the stellar brightness derivatives at the corresponding transits. This can work even in data that cannot temporally resolve the spot-crossing events themselves. Here we apply this approach to the $Kepler$ KOIs, identifying nine systems where the photometric spot modulation is large enough and the transit timing accurate enough to allow detection of a TTV-brightness-derivatives correlation. Of those systems five show highly significant prograde motion (Kepler-17b, Kepler-71b, KOI-883.01, KOI-895.01, and KOI-1074.01), while no system displays retrograde motion, consistent with the suggestion that planets orbiting cool stars have prograde motion. All five systems have impact parameter $0.2\lesssim b\lesssim0.5$, and all systems within that impact parameter range show significant correlation, except HAT-P-11b where the lack of a correlation follows its large stellar obliquity. Our search suffers from an observational bias against detection of high impact parameter cases, and the detected sample is extremely small. Nevertheless, our findings may suggest that stellar spots, or at least the larger ones, tend to be located at a low stellar latitude, but not along the stellar equator, similar to the Sun.
  • (abridged for arXiv) The BEER algorithm searches stellar light curves for the BEaming, Ellipsoidal, and Reflection photometric modulations that are caused by a short-period companion. Applying the search to the first five long-run center CoRoT fields, we identified $481$ non-eclipsing candidates with periodic flux amplitudes of $0.5-87$ mmag. Optimizing the Anglo-Australian-Telescope pointing coordinates and the AAOmega fiber-allocations with dedicated softwares, we acquired six spectra for $231$ candidates and seven spectra for another $50$ candidates in a seven-night campaign. Analysis of the red-arm AAOmega spectra, which covered the range of $8342-8842\AA{}$, yielded a radial-velocity precision of $\sim1$ km/s. Spectra containing lines of more than one star were analyzed with the two-dimensional correlation algorithm TODCOR. The measured radial velocities confirmed the binarity of seventy of the BEER candidates$-45$ single-line binaries, $18$ double-line binaries, and $7$ diluted binaries. We show that red giants introduce a major source of false candidates and demonstrate a way to improve BEER's performance in extracting higher fidelity samples from future searches of CoRoT light curves. The periods of the confirmed binaries span a range of $0.3-10$ days and show a rise in the number of binaries per $\Delta$log$P$ toward longer periods. The estimated mass ratios of the double-line binaries and the mass ratios assigned to the single-line binaries, assuming an isotropic inclination distribution, span a range of $0.03-1$. On the low-mass end, we have detected two brown-dwarf candidates on a $\sim1$ day period orbit. This is the first time non-eclipsing beaming binaries are detected in CoRoT data, and we estimate that $\sim300$ such binaries can be detected in the CoRoT long-run light curves.
  • We applied the BEER algorithm to the CoRoT lightcurves from the first five LRc fields and identified $481$ non-eclipsing BEER candidates with periodic lightcurve modulations and amplitudes of $0.5-87$ mmag. Medium-resolution spectra of $281$ candidates were obtained in a seven-night AAOmega radial-velocity (RV) campaign, with a precision of $\sim1$ km/s. The RVs confirmed the binarity of $70$ of the BEER candidates, with periods of $0.3-10$ days.
  • The observed amplitude of the rotational photometric modulation of a star with spots should depend on the inclination of its rotational axis relative to our line of sight. Therefore, the distribution of observed rotational amplitudes of a large sample of stars depends on the distribution of their projected axes of rotation. Thus, comparison of the stellar rotational amplitudes of the Kepler KOIs with those of Kepler single stars can provide a measure to indirectly infer the properties of the spin-orbit obliquity of Kepler planets. We apply this technique to the large samples of 993 KOIs and 33,614 single Kepler stars in temperature range of 3500-6500 K. We find with high significance that the amplitudes of cool KOIs are larger, on the order of 10%, than those of the single stars. In contrast, the amplitudes of hot KOIs are systematically lower. After correcting for an observational bias, we estimate that the amplitudes of the hot KOIs are smaller than the single stars by about the same factor of 10%. The border line between the relatively larger and smaller amplitudes, relative to the amplitudes of the single stars, occurs at about 6000K. Our results suggest that the cool stars have their planets aligned with their stellar rotation, while the planets around hot stars have large obliquities, consistent with the findings of Winn et al. (2010) and Albrecht et al. (2012). We show that the low obliquity of the planets around cool stars extends up to at least 50 days, a feature that is not expected in the framework of a model that assumes the low obliquity is due to planet-star tidal realignment.
  • Some transiting planets discovered by the Kepler mission display transit timing variations (TTVs) induced by stellar spots that rotate on the visible hemisphere of their parent stars. An induced TTV can be observed when a planet crosses a spot and modifies the shape of the transit light curve, even if the time resolution of the data does not allow to detect the crossing event itself. We present an approach that can, in some cases, use the derived TTVs of a planet to distinguish between a prograde and a retrograde planetary motion with respect to the stellar rotation. Assuming a single spot darker than the stellar disc, spot crossing by the planet can induce measured positive (negative) TTV, if the crossing occurs in the first (second) half of the transit. On the other hand, the motion of the spot towards (away from) the center of the stellar visible disc causes the stellar brightness to decrease (increase). Therefore, for a planet with prograde motion, the induced TTV is positive when the local slope of the stellar flux at the time of transit is negative, and vice versa. Thus, we can expect to observe a negative (positive) correlation between the TTVs and the photometric slopes for prograde (retrograde) motion. Using a simplistic analytical approximation, and also the publicly available SOAP-T tool to produce light curves of transits with spot-crossing events, we show for some cases how the induced TTVs depend on the local stellar photometric slopes at the transit timings. Detecting this correlation in Kepler transiting systems with high enough signal-to-noise ratio can allow us to distinguish between prograde and retrograde planetary motions. In coming papers we present analyses of the KOIs and Kepler eclipsing binaries, following the formalism developed here.
  • We analyzed the Kepler light curves of four transiting hot Jupiter systems --- KOI-13, HAT-P-7, TrES-2, and Kepler-76, which show BEaming, Ellipsoidal and Reflection (BEER) phase modulations. The mass of the four planets can be estimated from either the beaming or the ellipsoidal amplitude, given the mass and radius of their parent stars. For KOI-13, HAT-P-7, and Kepler-76 we find that the beaming-based planetary mass estimate is larger than the mass estimated from the ellipsoidal amplitude, consistent with previous studies. This apparent discrepancy may be explained by equatorial superrotation of the planet atmosphere, which induces an angle shift of the planet reflection/emission phase modulation, as was suggested for Kepler-76 in the first paper of this series. We propose a modified BEER model that supports superrotation, assuming either a Lambertian or geometric reflection/emission phase function, and provides a photometry-consistent estimate of the planetary mass. Our analysis shows that for Kepler-76 and HAT-P-7, the Lambertian superrotation BEER model is highly preferable over an unshifted null model, while for KOI-13 it is preferable only at a 1.4 sigma level. For TrES-2 we do not find such preference. For all four systems the Lambertian superrotation model mass estimates are in excellent agreement with the planetary masses derived from, or constrained by, radial velocity measurements. This makes the Lambertian superrotation BEER model a viable tool for estimating the masses of hot Jupiters from photometry alone. We conclude that hot Jupiter superrotation may be a common phenomenon that can be detected in the visual light curves of Kepler.
  • We make use of the high photometric precision of Kepler to search for periodic modulations among 14 normal (DA- and DB-type, likely non-magnetic) hot white dwarfs (WDs). In five, and possibly up to seven of the WDs, we detect periodic, ~2 hr to 10 d, variations, with semi-amplitudes of 60 - 2000 ppm, lower than ever seen in WDs. We consider various explanations: WD rotation combined with magnetic cool spots; rotation combined with magnetic dichroism; rotation combined with hot spots from an interstellar-medium accretion flow; transits by size ~50 - 200 km objects; relativistic beaming due to reflex motion caused by a cool companion WD; or reflection/re-radiation of the primary WD light by a brown-dwarf or giant-planet companion, undergoing illumination phases as it orbits the WD. Each mechanism could be behind some of the variable WDs, but could not be responsible for all five to seven variable cases. Alternatively, the periodicity may arise from UV metal-line opacity, associated with accretion of rocky material, a phenomenon seen in ~50% of hot WDs. Non-uniform UV opacity, combined with WD rotation and fluorescent optical re-emission of the absorbed UV energy, could perhaps explain our findings. Even if reflection by a planet is the cause in only a few of the seven cases, it would imply that hot Jupiters are very common around WDs. If some of the rotation-related mechanisms are at work, then normal WDs rotate as slowly as do peculiar WDs, the only kind for which precise rotation measurements have been possible to date. Followup observations for this sample, and the larger numbers of additional WDs now being monitored as part of the K2 Kepler mission extension, will soon discriminate among these possibilities.
  • In anticipation of the Gaia astrometric mission, a large sample of spectroscopic binaries is being observed since 2010 with the Sophie spectrograph at the Haute--Provence Observatory. Our aim is to derive the orbital elements of double-lined spectroscopic binaries (SB2s) with an accuracy sufficient to finally obtain the masses of the components with relative errors as small as 1% when the astrometric measurements of Gaia are taken into account. Simultaneously, the luminosities of the components in the Gaia photometric band G will also be obtained. Our observation program started with 200 SBs, including 152 systems that were only known as single-lined. Thanks to the high efficiency of the Sophie spectrograph, an additional component was found for 25 SBs. After rejection of 5 multiple systems, 20 new SB2s were retained, including 8 binaries with evolved primary, and their mass ratios were derived. Our final sample contains 68 SB2s, including 2 late-type giants and 10 other evolved stars.