• We present the detection and follow-up observations of planetary candidates around low-mass stars observed by the K2 mission. Based on light-curve analysis, adaptive-optics imaging, and optical spectroscopy at low and high resolution (including radial velocity measurements), we validate 16 planets around 12 low-mass stars observed during K2 campaigns 5-10. Among the 16 planets, 12 are newly validated, with orbital periods ranging from 0.96-33 days. For one of the planets (K2-151b) we present ground-based transit photometry, allowing us to refine the ephemerides. Combining our K2 M-dwarf planets together with the validated or confirmed planets found previously, we investigate the dependence of planet radius $R_p$ on stellar insolation and metallicity [Fe/H]. We confirm that for periods $P\lesssim 2$ days, planets with a radius $R_p\gtrsim 2\,R_\oplus$ are less common than planets with a radius between 1-2$\,R_\oplus$. We also see a hint of the "radius valley" between 1.5 and 2$\,R_\oplus$ that has been seen for close-in planets around FGK stars. These features in the radius/period distribution could be attributed to photoevaporation of planetary envelopes by high-energy photons from the host star, as they have for FGK stars. For the M dwarfs, though, the features are not as well defined, and we cannot rule out other explanations such as atmospheric loss from internal planetary heat sources, or truncation of the protoplanetary disk. There also appears to be a relation between planet size and metallicity: those few planets larger than about 3 $R_\oplus$ are found around the most metal-rich M dwarfs.
  • We present three-band simultaneous observations of a weak-line T-Tauri star CVSO~30 (PTFO~8-8695), which is one of the youngest objects having a candidate transiting planet. The data were obtained with the Multicolor Simultaneous Camera for studying Atmospheres of Transiting exoplanets (MuSCAT) on the 188 cm telescope at Okayama Astrophysical Observatory in Japan. We observed the fading event in the $g^{\prime}_2$-, $r^{\prime}_2$-, and $z_{\rm s,2}$-bands simultaneously. As a result, we find a significant wavelength dependence of fading depths of about 3.1\%, 1.7\%, 1.0\% for the $g^{\prime}_2$-, $r^{\prime}_2$-, and $z_{\rm s,2}$-bands, respectively. A cloudless H/He dominant atmosphere of a hot Jupiter cannot explain this large wavelength dependence. Additionally, we rule out a scenario by the occultation of the gravity-darkened host star. Thus our result is in favor of the fading origin as circumstellar dust clump or occultation of an accretion hotspot.
  • We report on the confirmation that the candidate transits observed for the star EPIC 211525389 are due to a short-period Neptune-sized planet. The host star, located in K2 campaign field 5, is a metal-rich ([Fe/H] = 0.26$\pm$0.05) G-dwarf (T_eff = 5430$\pm$70 K and log g = 4.48$\pm$0.09), based on observations with the High Dispersion Spectrograph (HDS) on the Subaru 8.2m telescope. High-spatial resolution AO imaging with HiCIAO on the Subaru telescope excludes faint companions near the host star, and the false positive probability of this target is found to be <$10^{-6}$ using the open source vespa code. A joint analysis of transit light curves from K2 and additional ground-based multi-color transit photometry with MuSCAT on the Okayama 1.88m telescope gives the orbital period of P = 8.266902$\pm$0.000070 days and consistent transit depths of $R_p/R_\star \sim 0.035$ or $(R_p/R_\star)^2 \sim 0.0012$. The transit depth corresponds to a planetary radius of $R_p = 3.59_{-0.39}^{+0.44} R_{\oplus}$, indicating that EPIC 211525389 b is a short-period Neptune-sized planet. Radial velocities of the host star, obtained with the Subaru HDS, lead to a 3\sigma\ upper limit of 90 $M_{\oplus} (0.00027 M_{\odot})$ on the mass of EPIC 211525389 b, confirming its planetary nature. We expect this planet, newly named K2-105 b, to be the subject of future studies to characterize its mass, atmosphere, spin-orbit (mis)alignment, as well as investigate the possibility of additional planets in the system.
  • We report the first ground-based transit observation of K2-3d, a 1.5 R_Earth planet supposedly within the habitable zone around a bright M-dwarf host star, using the Okayama 188 cm telescope and the multi(grz)-band imager MuSCAT. Although the depth of the transit (0.7 mmag) is smaller than the photometric precisions (1.2, 0.9, and 1.2 mmag per 60 s for the g, r, and z bands, respectively), we marginally but consistently identify the transit signal in all three bands, by taking advantage of the transit parameters from K2, and by introducing a novel technique that leverages multi-band information to reduce the systematics caused by second-order extinction. We also revisit previously analyzed Spitzer transit observations of K2-3d to investigate the possibility of systematic offsets in transit timing, and find that all the timing data can be explained well by a linear ephemeris. We revise the orbital period of K2-3d to be 44.55612 \pm 0.00021 days, which corrects the predicted transit times for 2019, i.e., the era of the James Webb Space Telescope, by \sim80 minutes. Our observation demonstrates that (1) even ground-based, 2 m class telescopes can play an important role in refining the transit ephemeris of small-sized, long-period planets, and that (2) a multi-band imager is useful to reduce the systematics of atmospheric origin, in particular for bluer bands and for observations conducted at low-altitude observatories.
  • We report on the discovery and characterization of the transiting planet K2-39b (EPIC 206247743b). With an orbital period of 4.6 days, it is the shortest-period planet orbiting a subgiant star known to date. Such planets are rare, with only a handful of known cases. The reason for this is poorly understood, but may reflect differences in planet occurrence around the relatively high-mass stars that have been surveyed, or may be the result of tidal destruction of such planets. K2-39 is an evolved star with a spectroscopically derived stellar radius and mass of $3.88^{+0.48}_{-0.42}~\mathrm{R_\odot}$ and $1.53^{+0.13}_{-0.12}~\mathrm{M_\odot}$, respectively, and a very close-in transiting planet, with $a/R_\star = 3.4$. Radial velocity (RV) follow-up using the HARPS, FIES and PFS instruments leads to a planetary mass of $50.3^{+9.7}_{-9.4}~\mathrm{M_\oplus}$. In combination with a radius measurement of $8.3 \pm 1.1~\mathrm{R_\oplus}$, this results in a mean planetary density of $0.50^{+0.29}_{-0.17}$ g~cm$^{-3}$. We furthermore discover a long-term RV trend, which may be caused by a long-period planet or stellar companion. Because K2-39b has a short orbital period, its existence makes it seem unlikely that tidal destruction is wholly responsible for the differences in planet populations around subgiant and main-sequence stars. Future monitoring of the transits of this system may enable the detection of period decay and constrain the tidal dissipation rates of subgiant stars.
  • We report on the detection and early characterization of a hot Jupiter in a 3-day orbit around K2-34 (EPIC~212110888), a metal-rich F-type star located in the K2 Cycle 5 field. Our follow-up campaign involves precise radial velocity (RV) measurements and high-contrast imaging using multiple facilities. The absence of a bright nearby source in our high-contrast data suggests that the transit-like signals are not due to light variations from such a companion star. Our intensive RV measurements show that K2-34b has a mass of $1.773\pm0.086M_J$, confirming its status as a planet. We also detect the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect for K2-34b and show that the system has a good spin-orbit alignment ($\lambda=-1_{-9}^{+10}$ degrees). High-contrast images obtained by the HiCIAO camera on the Subaru 8.2-m telescope reveal a faint companion candidate ($\Delta m_H=6.19\pm 0.11$ mag) at a separation of $0\farcs36$. Follow-up observations are needed to confirm that the companion candidate is physically associated with K2-34. K2-34b appears to be an example of a typical "hot Jupiter," albeit one which can be precisely characterized using a combination of K2 photometry and ground-based follow-up.
  • A radial velocity (RV) survey for intermediate-mass giants has been operated for over a decade at Okayama Astrophysical Observatory (OAO). The OAO survey has revealed that some giants show long-term linear RV accelerations (RV trends), indicating the presence of outer companions. Direct imaging observations can help clarify what objects generate these RV trends. We present the results of high-contrast imaging observations or six intermediate-mass giants with long-term RV trends using the Subaru Telescope and HiCIAO camera. We detected co-moving companions to $\gamma$ Hya B ($0.61^{+0.12}_{-0.14} M_\odot$), HD 5608 B ($0.10 \pm 0.01 M_\odot$), and HD 109272 B ($0.28 \pm 0.06 M_\odot$). For the remaining targets($\iota$ Dra, 18 Del, and HD 14067) we exclude companions more massive than 30-60 $M_\mathrm{Jup}$ at projected separations of 1arcsec-7arcsec. We examine whether these directly imaged companions or unidentified long-period companions can account for the RV trends observed around the six giants. We find that the Kozai mechanism can explain the high eccentricity of the inner planets $\iota$ Dra b, HD 5608 b, and HD 14067 b.
  • The Multicolor Simultaneous Camera for studying Atmospheres of Transiting exoplanets (MuSCAT) is an optical three-band (g'_2-, r'_2-, and z_{s,2}-band) imager that was recently developed for the 188cm telescope at Okayama Astrophysical Observatory with the aim of validating and characterizing transiting planets. In a pilot observation with MuSCAT we observed a primary transit of HAT-P-14b, a high-surface gravity (g_p=38 ms^{-2}) hot Jupiter around a bright (V=10) F-type star. From a 2.9 hr observation, we achieved the five-minute binned photometric precisions of 0.028%, 0.022%, and 0.024% in the g'_2, r'_2, and z_{s,2} bands, respectively, which provided the highest-quality photometric data for this planet. Combining these results with those of previous observations, we search for variations of transit timing and duration over five years as well as variations of planet-star radius ratio (R_p/R_s) with wavelengths, but can find no considerable variation in any parameters. On the other hand, using the transit-subtracted light curves we simulate achievable measurement error of R_p/R_s with MuSCAT for various planetary sizes, assuming three types of host stars: HAT-P-14, the nearby K dwarf HAT-P-11, and the nearby M dwarf GJ1214. Comparing our results with the expected atmospheric scale heights, we find that MuSCAT is capable of probing the atmospheres of planets as small as a sub-Jupiter (R_p ~6 R_Earth) around HAT-P-14 in all bands, a Neptune (~4R_Earth) around HAT-P-11 in all bands, and a super-Earth (~2.5R_Earth) around GJ1214 in r'_2 and z_{s,2} bands. These results promise that MuSCAT will produce fruitful scientific outcomes in the K2 and TESS era.
  • We validate a $R_p=2.32\pm 0.24R_\oplus$ planet on a close-in orbit ($P=2.260455\pm 0.000041$ days) around K2-28 (EPIC 206318379), a metal-rich M4-type dwarf in the Campaign 3 field of the K2 mission. Our follow-up observations included multi-band transit observations from the optical to the near infrared, low-resolution spectroscopy, and high-resolution adaptive-optics (AO) imaging. We perform a global fit to all the observed transits using a Gaussian process-based method and show that the transit depths in all passbands adopted for the ground-based transit follow-ups ($r'_2, z_\mathrm{s,2}, J, H, K_\mathrm{s}$) are within $\sim 2\sigma$ of the K2 value. Based on a model of the background stellar population and the absence of nearby sources in our AO imaging, we estimate the probability that a background eclipsing binary could cause a false positive to be $< 2\times 10^{-5}$. We also show that K2-28 cannot have a physically associated companion of stellar type later than M4, based on the measurement of almost identical transit depths in multiple passbands. There is a low probability for a M4 dwarf companion ($\approx 0.072_{-0.04}^{+0.02}$), but even if this were the case, the size of K2-28b falls within the planetary regime. K2-28b has the same radius (within $1\sigma$) and experiences a similar irradiation from its host star as the well-studied GJ~1214b. Given the relative brightness of K2-28 in the near infrared ($m_\mathrm{Kep}=14.85$ mag and $m_H=11.03$ mag) and relatively deep transit ($0.6-0.7\%$), a comparison between the atmospheric properties of these two planets with future observations would be especially interesting.
  • K2-19 (EPIC201505350) is an interesting planetary system in which two transiting planets with radii ~ 7 $R_{Earth}$ (inner planet b) and ~ 4 $R_{Earth}$ (outer planet c) have orbits that are nearly in a 3:2 mean-motion resonance. Here, we present results of ground-based follow-up observations for the K2-19 planetary system. We have performed high-dispersion spectroscopy and high-contrast adaptive-optics imaging of the host star with the HDS and HiCIAO on the Subaru 8.2m telescope. We find that the host star is relatively old (>8 Gyr) late G-type star ($T_{eff}$ ~ 5350 K, $M_s$ ~ 0.9 $M_{Sun}$, and $R_{s}$ ~ 0.9 $R_{Sun}$). We do not find any contaminating faint objects near the host star which could be responsible for (or dilute) the transit signals. We have also conducted transit follow-up photometry for the inner planet with KeplerCam on the FLWO 1.2m telescope, TRAPPISTCAM on the TRAPPIST 0.6m telescope, and MuSCAT on the OAO 1.88m telescope. We confirm the presence of transit-timing variations, as previously reported by Armstrong and coworkers. We model the observed transit-timing variations of the inner planet using the synodic chopping formulae given by Deck & Agol (2015). We find two statistically indistinguishable solutions for which the period ratios ($P_{c}/P_{b}$) are located slightly above and below the exact 3:2 commensurability. Despite the degeneracy, we derive the orbital period of the inner planet $P_b$ ~ 7.921 days and the mass of the outer planet $M_c$ ~ 20 $M_{Earth}$. Additional transit photometry (especially for the outer planet) as well as precise radial-velocity measurements would be helpful to break the degeneracy and to determine the mass of the inner planet.
  • We report a development of a multi-color simultaneous camera for the 188cm telescope at Okayama Astrophysical Observatory in Japan. The instrument, named MuSCAT, has a capability of 3-color simultaneous imaging in optical wavelength where CCDs are sensitive. MuSCAT is equipped with three 1024x1024 pixel CCDs, which can be controlled independently. The three CCDs detect lights in $g'_2$ (400--550 nm), $r'_2$ (550--700 nm), and $z_{s,2}$ (820--920 nm) bands using Astrodon Photometrics Generation 2 Sloan filters. The field of view of MuSCAT is 6.1x6.1 arcmin$^2$ with the pixel scale of 0.358 arcsec per pixel. The principal purpose of MuSCAT is to perform high precision multi-color transit photometry. For the purpose, MuSCAT has a capability of self autoguiding which enables to fix positions of stellar images within ~1 pix. We demonstrate relative photometric precisions of 0.101%, 0.074%, and 0.076% in $g'_2$, $r'_2$, and $z_{s,2}$ bands, respectively, for GJ436 (magnitudes in $g'$=11.81, $r'$=10.08, and $z'$=8.66) with 30 s exposures. The achieved precisions meet our objective, and the instrument is ready for operation.
  • WASP-80b is a warm Jupiter transiting a bright late-K/early-M dwarf, providing a good opportunity to extend the atmospheric study of hot Jupiters toward the lower temperature regime. We report multi-band, multi-epoch transit observations of WASP-80b by using three ground-based telescopes covering from optical (g', Rc, and Ic bands) to near-infrared (NIR; J, H, and Ks bands) wavelengths. We observe 5 primary transits, each of which in 3 or 4 different bands simultaneously, obtaining 17 independent transit light curves. Combining them with results from previous works, we find that the observed transmission spectrum is largely consistent with both a solar abundance and thick cloud atmospheric models at 1.7$\sigma$ discrepancy level. On the other hand, we find a marginal spectral rise in optical region compared to the NIR region at 2.9$\sigma$ level, which possibly indicates the existence of haze in the atmosphere. We simulate theoretical transmission spectra for a solar abundance but hazy atmosphere, finding that a model with equilibrium temperature of 600 K can explain the observed data well, having a discrepancy level of 1.0$\sigma$. We also search for transit timing variations, but find no timing excess larger than 50 s from a linear ephemeris. In addition, we conduct 43 day long photometric monitoring of the host star in the optical bands, finding no significant variation in the stellar brightness. Combined with the fact that no spot-crossing event is observed in the five transits, our results confirm previous findings that the host star appears quiet for spot activities, despite the indications of strong chromospheric activities.