• We study the problem of distributed task allocation inspired by the behavior of social insects, which perform task allocation in a setting of limited capabilities and noisy environment feedback. We assume that each task has a demand that should be satisfied but not exceeded, i.e., there is an optimal number of ants that should be working on this task at a given time. The goal is to assign a near-optimal number of workers to each task in a distributed manner and without explicit access to the values of the demands nor the number of ants working on the task. We seek to answer the question of how the quality of task allocation depends on the accuracy of assessing whether too many (overload) or not enough (lack) ants are currently working on a given task. Concretely, we address the open question of solving task allocation in the model where each ant receives feedback that depends on the deficit defined as the (possibly negative) difference between the optimal demand and the current number of workers in the task. The feedback is modeled as a random variable that takes value lack or overload with probability given by a sigmoid of the deficit. Each ants receives the feedback independently, but the higher the overload or lack of workers for a task, the more likely it is that all the ants will receive the same, correct feedback from this task; the closer the deficit is to zero, the less reliable the feedback becomes. We measure the performance of task allocation algorithms using the notion of regret, defined as the absolute value of the deficit summed over all tasks and summed over time. We propose a simple, constant-memory, self-stabilizing, distributed algorithm that quickly converges from any initial distribution to a near-optimal assignment. We also show that our algorithm works not only under stochastic noise but also in an adversarial noise setting.
  • We introduce the study of the ant colony house-hunting problem from a distributed computing perspective. When an ant colony's nest becomes unsuitable due to size constraints or damage, the colony must relocate to a new nest. The task of identifying and evaluating the quality of potential new nests is distributed among all ants. The ants must additionally reach consensus on a final nest choice and the full colony must be transported to this single new nest. Our goal is to use tools and techniques from distributed computing theory in order to gain insight into the house-hunting process. We develop a formal model for the house-hunting problem inspired by the behavior of the Temnothorax genus of ants. We then show a \Omega(log n) lower bound on the time for all n ants to agree on one of k candidate nests. We also present two algorithms that solve the house-hunting problem in our model. The first algorithm solves the problem in optimal O(log n) time but exhibits some features not characteristic of natural ant behavior. The second algorithm runs in O(k log n) time and uses an extremely simple and natural rule for each ant to decide on the new nest.
  • We consider the ANTS problem [Feinerman et al.] in which a group of agents collaboratively search for a target in a two-dimensional plane. Because this problem is inspired by the behavior of biological species, we argue that in addition to studying the {\em time complexity} of solutions it is also important to study the {\em selection complexity}, a measure of how likely a given algorithmic strategy is to arise in nature due to selective pressures. In more detail, we propose a new selection complexity metric $\chi$, defined for algorithm ${\cal A}$ such that $\chi({\cal A}) = b + \log \ell$, where $b$ is the number of memory bits used by each agent and $\ell$ bounds the fineness of available probabilities (agents use probabilities of at least $1/2^\ell$). In this paper, we study the trade-off between the standard performance metric of speed-up, which measures how the expected time to find the target improves with $n$, and our new selection metric. In particular, consider $n$ agents searching for a treasure located at (unknown) distance $D$ from the origin (where $n$ is sub-exponential in $D$). For this problem, we identify $\log \log D$ as a crucial threshold for our selection complexity metric. We first prove a new upper bound that achieves a near-optimal speed-up of $(D^2/n +D) \cdot 2^{O(\ell)}$ for $\chi({\cal A}) \leq 3 \log \log D + O(1)$. In particular, for $\ell \in O(1)$, the speed-up is asymptotically optimal. By comparison, the existing results for this problem [Feinerman et al.] that achieve similar speed-up require $\chi({\cal A}) = \Omega(\log D)$. We then show that this threshold is tight by describing a lower bound showing that if $\chi({\cal A}) < \log \log D - \omega(1)$, then with high probability the target is not found within $D^{2-o(1)}$ moves per agent. Hence, there is a sizable gap to the straightforward $\Omega(D^2/n + D)$ lower bound in this setting.