• K. C. Chambers, E. A. Magnier, N. Metcalfe, H. A. Flewelling, M. E. Huber, C. Z. Waters, L. Denneau, P. W. Draper, D. Farrow, D. P. Finkbeiner, C. Holmberg, J. Koppenhoefer, P. A. Price, A. Rest, R. P. Saglia, E. F. Schlafly, S. J. Smartt, W. Sweeney, R. J. Wainscoat, W. S. Burgett, S. Chastel, T. Grav, J. N. Heasley, K. W. Hodapp, R. Jedicke, N. Kaiser, R.-P. Kudritzki, G. A. Luppino, R. H. Lupton, D. G. Monet, J. S. Morgan, P. M. Onaka, B. Shiao, C. W. Stubbs, J. L. Tonry, R. White, E. Bañados, E. F. Bell, R. Bender, E. J. Bernard, M. Boegner, F. Boffi, M. T. Botticella, A. Calamida, S. Casertano, W.-P. Chen, X. Chen, S. Cole, N. Deacon, C. Frenk, A. Fitzsimmons, S. Gezari, V. Gibbs, C. Goessl, T. Goggia, R. Gourgue, B. Goldman, P. Grant, E. K. Grebel, N.C. Hambly, G. Hasinger, A. F. Heavens, T. M. Heckman, R. Henderson, T. Henning, M. Holman, U. Hopp, W.-H. Ip, S. Isani, M. Jackson, C. D. Keyes, A. M. Koekemoer, R. Kotak, D. Le, D. Liska, K. S. Long, J. R. Lucey, M. Liu, N. F. Martin, G. Masci, B. McLean, E. Mindel, P. Misra, E. Morganson, D. N. A. Murphy, A. Obaika, G. Narayan, M. A. Nieto-Santisteban, P. Norberg, J. A. Peacock, E. A. Pier, M. Postman, N. Primak, C. Rae, A. Rai, A. Riess, A. Riffeser, H. W. Rix, S. Röser, R. Russel, L. Rutz, E. Schilbach, A. S. B. Schultz, D. Scolnic, L. Strolger, A. Szalay, S. Seitz, E. Small, K. W. Smith, D. R. Soderblom, P. Taylor, R. Thomson, A. N. Taylor, A. R. Thakar, J. Thiel, D. Thilker, D. Unger, Y. Urata, J. Valenti, J. Wagner, T. Walder, F. Walter, S. P. Watters, S. Werner, W. M. Wood-Vasey, R. Wyse
    Pan-STARRS1 has carried out a set of distinct synoptic imaging sky surveys including the $3\pi$ Steradian Survey and the Medium Deep Survey in 5 bands ($grizy_{P1}$). The mean 5$\sigma$ point source limiting sensitivities in the stacked 3$\pi$ Steradian Survey in $grizy_{P1}$ are (23.3, 23.2, 23.1, 22.3, 21.4) respectively. The upper bound on the systematic uncertainty in the photometric calibration across the sky is 7-12 millimag depending on the bandpass. The systematic uncertainty of the astrometric calibration using the Gaia frame comes from a comparison of the results with Gaia: the standard deviation of the mean and median residuals ($ \Delta ra, \Delta dec $) are (2.3, 1.7) milliarcsec, and (3.1, 4.8) milliarcsec respectively. The Pan-STARRS system and the design of the PS1 surveys are described and an overview of the resulting image and catalog data products and their basic characteristics are described together with a summary of important results. The images, reduced data products, and derived data products from the Pan-STARRS1 surveys are available to the community from the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes (MAST) at STScI.
  • May 30, 2017 astro-ph.EP
    We present a summary of the campaign of remote observations that supported the European Space Agency's Rosetta mission. Telescopes across the globe (and in space) followed comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko from before Rosetta's arrival until nearly the end of mission in September 2016. These provided essential data for mission planning, large-scale context information for the coma and tails beyond the spacecraft, and a way to directly compare 67P with other comets. The observations revealed 67P to be a relatively `well behaved' comet, typical of Jupiter family comets and with activity patterns that repeat from orbit-to-orbit. Comparison between this large collection of telescopic observations and the in situ results from Rosetta will allow us to better understand comet coma chemistry and structure. This work is just beginning as the mission ends -- in this paper we present a summary of the ground-based observations and early results, and point to many questions that will be addressed in future studies.
  • MICADO will equip the E-ELT with a first light capability for diffraction limited imaging at near-infrared wavelengths. The instrument's observing modes focus on various flavours of imaging, including astrometric, high contrast, and time resolved. There is also a single object spectroscopic mode optimised for wavelength coverage at moderately high resolution. This contribution provides an overview of the key functionality of the instrument, outlining the scientific rationale for its observing modes. The interface between MICADO and the adaptive optics system MAORY that feeds it is summarised. The design of the instrument is discussed, focussing on the optics and mechanisms inside the cryostat, together with a brief overview of the other key sub-systems.
  • We present post-cryogenic Spitzer imaging at 3.6 and 4.5 micron with the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) of the Spitzer/HETDEX Exploratory Large-Area (SHELA) survey. SHELA covers $\sim$deg$^2$ of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey "Stripe 82" region, and falls within the footprints of the Hobby-Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment (HETDEX) and the Dark Energy Survey. The HETDEX blind R $\sim$ 800 spectroscopy will produce $\sim$ 200,000 redshifts from the Lyman-$\alpha$ emission for galaxies in the range 1.9 < z < 3.5, and an additional $\sim$200,000 redshifts from the [OII] emission for galaxies at z < 0.5. When combined with deep ugriz images from the Dark Energy Camera, K-band images from NEWFIRM, and other ancillary data, the IRAC photometry from Spitzer will enable a broad range of scientific studies of the relationship between structure formation, galaxy stellar mass, halo mass, AGN, and environment over a co-moving volume of $\sim$0.5 Gpc$^3$ at 1.9 < z < 3.5. Here, we discuss the properties of the SHELA IRAC dataset, including the data acquisition, reduction, validation, and source catalogs. Our tests show the images and catalogs are 80% (50%) complete to limiting magnitudes of 22.0 (22.6) AB mag in the detection image, which is constructed from the weighted sum of the IRAC 3.6 and 4.5 micron images. The catalogs reach limiting sensitivities of 1.1 $\mu$Jy at both 3.6 and 4.5 micron (1$\sigma$, for R=2 arcsec circular apertures). As a demonstration of science, we present IRAC number counts, examples of highly temporally variable sources, and galaxy surface density profiles of rich galaxy clusters. In the spirit of Spitzer Exploratory programs we provide all images and catalogs as part of the publication.
  • We analyse distribution, kinematics and star-formation (SF) properties of satellite galaxies in three different samples of nearby groups. We find that studied groups are generally well approximated by low-concentration NFW model, show a variety of LOS velocity dispersion profiles and signs of SF quenching in outskirts of dwarf satellite galaxies.
  • The goal of this work is to conduct a photometric study of eclipsing binaries in M31. We apply a modified box-fitting algorithm to search for eclipsing binary candidates and determine their period. We classify these candidates into detached, semi-detached, and contact systems using the Fourier decomposition method. We cross-match the position of our detached candidates with the photometry from Local Group Survey (Massey et al. 2006) and select 13 candidates brighter than 20.5 magnitude in V. The relative physical parameters of these detached candidates are further characterized with Detached Eclipsing Binary Light curve fitter (DEBiL) by Devor (2005). We will followup the detached eclipsing binaries spectroscopically and determine the distance to M31.
  • Galaxy evolution by interaction driven transformation is probably highly efficient in groups of galaxies. Dwarf galaxies with their shallow potential are expected to reflect the interaction most prominently in their observable structure. The major aim of this series of papers is to establish a data base which allows to study the impact of group interaction onto the morphology and star-forming properties of dwarf galaxies. Firstly, we present our selection rules for target groups and the morphological selection method of target dwarf member candidates. Secondly, the spectroscopic follow-up observations with the HET are present. Thirdly, we applied own reduction methods based on adaptive filtering to derive surface photometry of the candidates. The spectroscopic follow-up indicate a dwarf identification success rate of roughly 55%, and a group member success rate of about 33%. A total of 17 new low surface brightness members is presented. For all candidates, total magnitudes, colours, and light distribution parameters are derived and discussed in the context of scaling relations. We point out short comings of the SDSS standard pipeline for surface photometry for these dim objects. We conclude that our selection strategy is rather efficient to obtain a sample of dim, low surface brightness members of groups of galaxies within the Virgo super-cluster. The photometric scaling relation in these X-ray dim, rather isolated groups does not significantly differ from those of the galaxies within the Local Volume.
  • We perform a study on the optical and infrared photometric properties of known luminous blue variables (LBVs) in M31 using the sample of LBV candidates from the Local Group Galaxy Survey (Massey et al. 2007). We find that M31 LBV candidates show photometric variability ranging from 0.375 to 1.576 magnitudes in rP1 during a three year time-span observed by the Pan-STARRS 1 Andromeda survey (PAndromeda). Their near-infrared colors also follow the distribution of Galactic LBVs as shown by Oksala et al. (2013). We use these features as selection criteria to search for unknown LBV candidates in M31. We thus devise a method to search for candidate LBVs using both optical color from the Local Group Galaxy Survey and infrared color from Two Micron All Sky Survey, as well as photometric variations observed by PAndromeda. We find four sources exhibiting common properties of known LBVs. These sources also exhibit UV emission as seen from GALEX, which is one of the previously adopted method to search for LBV candidates. The locations of the LBVs are well aligned withM31 spiral arms as seen in the UV light, suggesting they are evolved stars at young age given their high-mass nature. We compare these candidates with the latest Geneva evolutionary tracks, which show that our new M31 LBV candidates are massive evolved stars with an age of 10 to 100 million years.
  • We present a sample of M31 beat Cepheids from the Pan-STARRS 1 PAndromeda campaign. By analyzing three years of PAndromeda data, we identify seventeen beat Cepheids, spreading from a galactocentric distance of 10 to 16 kpc. Since the relation between fundamental mode period and the ratio of fundamental to the first overtone period puts a tight constraint on metallicity we are able to derive the metallicity at the position of the beat Cepheids using the relations from the model of Buchler (2008). Our metallicity estimates show subsolar values within 15 kpc, similar to the metallicities from HII regions (Zurita & Bresolin 2012). We then use the metallicity estimates to calculate the metallicity gradient of the M31 disk, which we find to be closer to the metallicity gradient derived from planetary nebulae (Kwitter et al. 2012) than the metallicity gradient from HII regions (Zurita & Bresolin 2012).
  • The Pan-STARRS 1 (PS1) survey of M31 (PAndromeda) is designed to identify gravitational microlensing events, caused by bulge and disk stars (self-lensing) and by compact matter in the halos of M31 and the Milky Way (halo lensing, or lensing by MACHOs). With the 7 deg2 FOV of PS1, the entire disk of M31 can be imaged with one single pointing. Our aim is to monitor M31 with this wide FOV with daily sampling (20 mins/day). In the 2010 season we acquired in total 91 nights towards M31, with 90 nights in the rP1 and 66 nights in the iP1. The total integration time in rP1 and iP1 are 70740s and 36180s, respectively. As a preliminary analysis, we study a 40'\times40' sub-field in the central region of M31, a 20'\times20' sub-field in the disk of M31 and a 20'\times20' sub-field for the investigation of astrometric precision. We demonstrate that the PSF is good enough to detect microlensing events. We present light curves for 6 candidate microlensing events. This is a competitive rate compared to previous M31 microlensing surveys. We finally also present one example light curve for Cepheids, novae and eclipsing binaries in these sub-fields.
  • We present light curves from the novae detected in the long-term, M31 monitoring WeCAPP project. The goal of WeCAPP is to constrain the compact dark matter fraction of the M31 halo with microlensing observations. As a by product we have detected 91 novae benefiting from the high cadence and highly sensitive difference imaging technique required for pixellensing. We thus can now present the largest CCD and optical filters based nova light curve sample up-to-date towards M31. We also obtained thorough coverage of the light curve before and after the eruption thanks to the long-term monitoring. We apply the nova taxonomy proposed by Strope et al. (2010) to our nova candidates and found 29 S-class novae, 10 C-class novae, 2 O-class novae and 1 J-class nova. We have investigated the universal decline law advocated by Hachichu and Kato (2006) on the S-class novae. In addition, we correlated our catalogue with the literature and found 4 potential recurrent novae. Part of our catalogue has been used to search for optical counter-parts of the super soft X-ray sources detected in M31 (Pietsch et al. 2005). Optical surveys like WeCAPP, and coordinated with multi-wavelength observation, will continue to shed light on the underlying physical mechanism of novae in the future.
  • We present new optical long-slit data along 6 position angles of the bulge region of M31. We derive accurate stellar and gas kinematics reaching 5 arcmin from the center, where the disk light contribution is always less than 30%, and out to 8 arcmin along the major axis, where the disk makes 55% of the total light. We show that the velocity dispersions of McElroy (1983) are severely underestimated (by up to 50 km/s) and previous dynamical models have underestimated the stellar mass of M31's bulge by a factor 2. Moreover, the light-weighted velocity dispersion of the galaxy grows to 166 km/s, thus reducing the discrepancy between the predicted and measured mass of the black hole at the center of M31. The kinematic position angle varies with distance, pointing to triaxiality. We detect gas counterrotation near the bulge minor axis. We measure eight emission-corrected Lick indices. They are approximately constant on circles. We derive the age, metallicity and alpha-element overabundance profiles. Except for the region in the inner arcsecs of the galaxy, the bulge of M31 is uniformly old (>12 Gyr, with many best-fit ages at the model grid limit of 15 Gyr), slightly alpha-elements overabundant ([alpha/Fe]~0.2) and at solar metallicity, in agreement with studies of the resolved stellar components. The predicted u-g, g-r and r-i Sloan color profiles match reasonably well the dust-corrected observations. The stellar populations have approximately radially constant mass-to-light ratios (M/L_R ~ 4-4.5 for a Kroupa IMF), in agreement with stellar dynamical estimates based on our new velocity dispersions. In the inner arcsecs the luminosity-weighted age drops to 4-8 Gyr, while the metallicity increases to above 3 times the solar value.
  • We carried out visual and parametric searches for dwarf galaxies in five loose groups of galaxies. Follow-up spectroscopy with the HET has shown a 50% success rate of morphological selection. The evolutionary status of the studied groups differs: while the NGC 6962 group has a partially relaxed core, surrounded by an infall region, the NGC 5005/5033 group and the IC 65 group, which consist only of late-type galaxies, are probably still assembling.
  • Context. Spitzer Space Telescope observations and dust emission models are used to discuss the distribution of dust and its characteristics in M31. Together with GALEX FUV, NUV, and SDSS images we studied the age dependence of the dust heating process. Methods.Spitzer IRAC/MIPS maps of M31 were matched together and compared to dust emission models allowing to constrain the dust mass, the intensity of the mean radiation field, the abundance of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH) particles. The total infrared emission (TIR) was analyzed in function of UV and Optical colors and compared to predictions of models which consider the age-dependent dust heating. Results. We demonstrate that cold-dust component emission dominates the infrared spectral energy distribution of M31. The mean intensity of the radiation field heating the dust is low (typically U<2, where U=1 is the value in the solar surrounding). Due to the lack of submillimetric measurements the dust mass (M_{dust}) is only weakly constrained by the infrared spectrum. We show that across the spiral-ring structure of M31 a fraction >3% of the total dust mass is in PAHs. UV and optical colors are correlated to (TIR/FUV) ratios in \sim 670 pc-sized regions overall the disk of M31, although deviating from the IRX-beta relationship for starburst galaxies. We derived that in 83% of the regions analyzed across the 10kpc ring more than 50% of the energy absorbed by the dust is rediated at \lambda > 4000 \AA and that dust in M31 appears mainly heated by populations a few Gyr old even across the star-forming ring. The attenuation is varying radially peaking near 10kpc and decreasing faster in the inner regions of M31 than in the outer regions. We finally derived the attenuation map of M31 at 6"/px resolution (\sim 100 pc/px along the plane of M31).[abridged]
  • The first two months of spectroscopic and photometric monitoring of the nearby type Ic SN 2007gr are presented. The very early discovery (less than 5 days after the explosion) and the relatively short distance of the host galaxy motivated an extensive observational campaign. SN 2007gr shows an average peak luminosity but unusually narrow spectral lines and an almost flat photospheric velocity profile. The detection of prominent carbon features in the spectra is shown and suggest a wide range in carbon abundance in stripped-envelope supernovae. SN 2007gr may be an important piece in the puzzle of the observed diversity of CC SNe.
  • We carry out a photometric study of a poor group of late-type galaxies around IC 65, with the aim: (a) to search for new dwarf members and to measure their photometric characteristics; (b) to search for possible effects of mutual interactions on the morphology and star-formation characteristics of luminous and faint group members; (c) to evaluate the evolutionary status of this particular group. We make use of our BRI CCD observations, DPOSS blue and red frames, and the 2MASS JHK frames. In addition, we use the HI imaging data, the far-infrared and radio data from the literature. Search for dwarf galaxies is made using the SExtractor software. Detailed surface photometry is performed with the MIDAS package. Four LSB galaxies were classified as probable dwarf members of the group and the BRI physical and model parameters were derived for the first time for all true and probable group members. Newly found dIrr galaxies around the IC 65 contain a number of H II regions, which show a range of ages and propagating star-formation. Mildly disturbed gaseous and/or stellar morphology is found in several group members. Various structural, dynamical, and star-forming characteristics let us conclude that the IC 65 group is a typical poor assembly of late-type galaxies at an early stage of its dynamical evolution with some evidence of intragroup (tidal) interactions.
  • The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) has embarked on a multi-year project to identify and measure light curves for intermediate-redshift (0.05 < z < 0.35) Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) using repeated five-band (ugriz) imaging over an area of 300 sq. deg. The survey region is a stripe 2.5 degrees wide centered on the celestial equator in the Southern Galactic Cap that has been imaged numerous times in earlier years, enabling construction of a deep reference image for discovery of new objects. Supernova imaging observations are being acquired between 1 September and 30 November of 2005-7. During the first two seasons, each region was imaged on average every five nights. Spectroscopic follow-up observations to determine supernova type and redshift are carried out on a large number of telescopes. In its first two three-month seasons, the survey has discovered and measured light curves for 327 spectroscopically confirmed SNe Ia, 30 probable SNe Ia, 14 confirmed SNe Ib/c, 32 confirmed SNe II, plus a large number of photometrically identified SNe Ia, 94 of which have host-galaxy spectra taken so far. This paper provides an overview of the project and briefly describes the observations completed during the first two seasons of operation.
  • We address the hypothesis that High Velocity Clouds correspond to the "missing" dwarf galaxies of the Local Group predicted by cosmological simulations. To this end, we present optical and near-infrared photometry of five additional High Velocity Clouds, one of which produces Lyman series absorption on the sight line towards the Quasar Ton S210, with sufficient resolution and sensitivity to enable the detection of an associated stellar content. We do not detect significant stellar populations intrinsic to any of the five clouds. In combination with the results from our paper I, which had yielded non detections of stellar content in another five cases, we find that there is a 50% chance of getting a null result in ten trials if fewer than 7% of all High Velocity Clouds contain stars. We conclude that the population of High Velocity Clouds is an unlikely repository for the "missing" dwarfs of the Local Group.
  • We present the morphological analysis based on HST-NIC2 (0.075 arcsec/pixel) images in the F160W filter of a sample of 9 massive field (> 10^{11} M_\odot) galaxies spectroscopically classified as early-types at 1.2<z<1.7. Our analysis shows that all of them are bulge dominated systems. In particular, 6 of them are well fitted by a de Vaucouleurs profile (n=4) suggesting that they can be considered pure elliptical galaxies. The remaining 3 galaxies are better fitted by a Sersic profile with index 1.9<n<2.3 suggesting that a disk-like component could contribute up to 30% to the total light of these galaxies. We derived the effective radius R_e and the mean surface brightness <mu_e> within R_e of our galaxies and we compared them with those of early-types at lower redshifts. We find that the surface brightness <mu_e> of our galaxies should get fainter by 2.5 mag from z~1.5 to z~0 to match the surface brightness of the local ellipticals with comparable R_e, i.e. the local Kormendy relation. Luminosity evolution without morphological changes can only explain half of this effect, as the maximum dimming expected for an elliptical galaxy is ~1.6 mag in this redshift range. Thus, other parameters, possibly structural, may undergo evolution and play an important role in reconciling models and observations. Hypothesizing an evolution of the effective radius of galaxies we find that R_e should increase by a factor 1.5 from z~1.5 to z~0.
  • The optical rest-frame sizes of 10 of the most massive (~5x10^{11}h_{70}^{-2}M_sun) galaxies found in the near-infrared MUNICS survey at 1.2<z<1.7 are analysed. Sizes were estimated both in the J and K' filters. These massive galaxies are at least a factor of 4_{-1.0}^{+1.9} (+-1 sigma) smaller in the rest-frame V-band than local counterparts of the same stellar mass. Consequently, the stellar mass density of these objects is (at least) 60 times larger than massive ellipticals today. Although the stellar populations of these objects are passively fading, their structural properties are rapidly changing since that redshift. This observational fact disagrees with a scenario where the more massive and passive galaxies are fully assembled at z~1.4 (i.e. a monolithic scenario) and points towards a dry merger scenario as the responsible mechanism for the subsequent evolution of these galaxies.
  • We present the results of a search for Lyman-alpha emission galaxies at z~ 5.7 in the FORS Deep Field. The objective of this study is to improve the faint end of the luminosity function of high-redshift Lyman-alpha emitting galaxies and to derive properties of intrinsically faint Lyman-alpha emission galaxies in the young universe. Using FORS2 at the ESO VLT and a set of special interference filters, we identified candidates for high-redshift Lyman-alpha galaxies. We then used FORS2 in spectroscopic mode to verify the identifications and to study their spectral properties. The narrow-band photometry resulted in the detection of 15 likely Lyman-alpha emission galaxies. Spectra with an adequate exposure time could be obtained for eight galaxies. In all these cases the presence of Lyman-alpha emission at z = 5.7 was confirmed spectroscopically. The line fluxes of the 15 candidates range between 3 and 16 * 10^-21 Wm^-2, which corresponds to star-formation rates not corrected for dust between 1 and 5 Msun/yr. The luminosity function derived for our photometrically identified objects extends the published luminosity functions of intrinsically brighter Lyman-alpha galaxies. With this technique the study of high-redshift Lyman-alpha emission galaxies can be extended to low intrinsic luminosities.
  • We present optical long-slit spectra of the Virgo dwarf elliptical galaxy VCC 510 at high spectral and spatial resolution. Heliocentric velocities and velocity dispersions as functions of galaxy radius are derived by deconvolving line-of-sight velocity distributions. A maximum rotation v_rot=8 km/s inside half the effective radius (re~20 arcsec) and a mean, radially flat velocity dispersion sigma=44 km/s are measured. The core extending over the inner 2 arcsec (~140 pc) is found to rotate in the opposite sense with v_rot(core) ~ -1/2 v_rot. VCC 510 (M_B ~ -15.7) is therefore by far the faintest and smallest galaxy with a counter-rotating core known. From the main body rotation and the velocity dispersion profile we deduce that VCC 510 is anisotropic and clearly not entirely supported by rotation. By comparison of Lick absorption-line indices with stellar population models we derive an old luminosity-weighted age (10 Gyr) and sub-solar metallicity ([Z/H]=-0.4) inside the effective radius. There is tentative evidence that the counter-rotating core might be younger and less alpha/Fe enhanced. From the stellar population parameters we obtain a total stellar mass-to-light ratio of ~3.6 (M/L_B)_sun which is significantly lower than a rough dynamical estimate obtained from the kinematics through the virial theorem (~15). This discrepancy hints toward the possible presence of dark matter in the centre of VCC 510. We discuss the origin of the counter-rotating core and exclude fly-by encounters as a viable possibility. Gas accretion or galaxy merging provide more likely explanations. VCC 510 is therefore the direct observational evidence that such processes do occur in cluster satellite galaxies on dwarf galaxy scales.
  • Dwarf galaxies in the local group provide a unique astrophysical laboratory. In particular, they allow us to probe pulsating (and other) variable stars in low-metallicity environments with abundances below that of the SMC. Our observing program, described in detail by C. G\"ossl's contribution, yields a large number of intrinsically bright variable stars that can serve as probes of the stellar population and star formation history of these galaxies. Most prominent are pulsation variables like Miras (LPVs) and $\delta$ Cep stars, but we also find other types of variable stars, e.g. RV Tauri stars, irregular red variables etc. We present a preliminary census for the three galaxies DDO 216, Leo A and GR8.
  • Dwarf galaxies in the Local Group provide a unique astrophysical laboratory. Despite their proximity some of these systems still lack a reliable distance determination as well as studies of their stellar content and star formation history. We present first results of our survey of variable stars in a sample of six Local Group dwarf irregular galaxies. We describe observational strategies and data reduction, and discuss the lightcurves of newly found and rediscovered dCep stars in DDO216, LeoA and GR8. Based on these data, we present newly derived independent Cepheid distances. Other variable stars found in our survey are discussed in a related article of this volume (Snigula et al.).
  • We present the sixth list with results of the Hamburg/SAO Survey for Emission-Line Galaxies. The final list resulted from follow-up spectroscopy conducted with the 4.5m MMT telescope in 1996, and with 2.2m CAHA and 6m SAO telescopes in 2000 to 2003. The data of this snap-shot spectroscopy survey confirmed 134 emission-line objects out of 182 observed candidates and allowed their quantitative spectral classification and redshift determination. We classify 73 emission-line objects as definite or probable blue compact or HII galaxies (BCG), 8 as QSOs, 4 as Seyfert 1 and 2 galaxies. 30 low-excitation objects were classified as definite or probable starburst nuclei (SBN), 3 as dwarf amorphous nuclei starburst galaxies (DANS) and 2 as LINERs. Due to the low signal-to-noise ratio we could not classify 14 ELGs (NON). For another 9 galaxies we did not detect any significant emission lines. For 98 emission-line galaxies, the redshifts and/or line intensities are determined for the first time. For the remaining 28 previously-known ELGs we give either improved data the line intensities or some independent measurements. The detection rate of ELGs is ~70%. This paper completes the classification of strong-lined ELGs found in the zone of the Hamburg/SAO survey. Together with previously known BCG/HII galaxies in this zone, this sample of ~500 objects is the largest to date in a well bound region.