• Tunnelling, one of the key features of quantum mechanics, ignited an ongoing debate about the value, meaning and interpretation of 'tunnelling time'. Until recently the debate was purely theoretical, with the process considered to be instantaneous for all practical purposes. This changed with the development of ultrafast lasers and in particular, the 'attoclock' technique that is used to probe the attosecond dynamics of electrons. Although the initial attoclock measurements hinted at instantaneous tunnelling, later experiments contradicted those findings, claiming to have measured finite tunnelling times. In each case these measurements were performed with multi-electron atoms. Atomic hydrogen (H), the simplest atomic system with a single electron, can be 'exactly' (subject only to numerical limitations) modelled using numerical solutions of the 3D-TDSE with measured experimental parameters and acts as a convenient benchmark for both accurate experimental measurements and calculations. Here we report the first attoclock experiment performed on H and find that our experimentally determined offset angles are in excellent agreement with accurate 3D-TDSE simulations performed using our experimental pulse parameters. The same simulations with a short-range Yukawa potential result in zero offset angles for all intensities. We conclude that the offset angle measured in the attoclock experiments originates entirely from electron scattering by the long-range Coulomb potential with no contribution from tunnelling time delay. That conclusion is supported by empirical observation that the electron offset angles follow closely the simple formula for the deflection angle of electrons undergoing classical Rutherford scattering by the Coulomb potential. Thus we confirm that, in H, tunnelling is instantaneous (with an upperbound of 1.8 as) within our experimental and numerical uncertainty.
  • We study an optomechanical system consisting of an optical cavity and movable mirror coupled through dispersive linear optomechanical coupling (LOC) and quadratic optomechanical coupling(QOC). We work in the resolved side band limit with a high quality factor mechanical oscillator in a strong coupling regime. We show that the presence of QOC in the conventional optomechanical system (with LOC alone) modifies the mechanical oscillator's frequency and reduces the back-action effects on mechanical oscillator. As a result of this the fluctuations in mechanical oscillator can be suppressed below standard quantum limit thereby squeeze the mechanical motion of resonator. We also show that either of the quadratures can be squeezed depending on the sign of the QOC. With detailed numerical calculations and analytical approximation we show that in such systems, the 3 dB limit can be beaten.