• In all lossy communication channels realized to date, information is inevitably leaked to a potential eavesdropper. Here we present a communication protocol that does not allow for any information leakage to a potential eavesdropper in a purely lossy channel. By encoding information into a restricted Gaussian alphabet of squeezed states we show, both theoretically and experimentally, that the Holevo information between the eavesdropper and the intended recipient can be exactly zero in a purely lossy channel while minimized in a noisy channel. This result is of fundamental interest, but might also have practical implications in extending the distance of secure quantum key distribution.
  • We investigate the performance of a Kennedy receiver, which is known as a beneficial tool in optical coherent communications, to the quantum state discrimination of the two superpositions of vacuum and single photon states corresponding to the $\hat\sigma_x$ eigenstates in the single-rail encoding of photonic qubits. We experimentally characterize the Kennedy receiver in vacuum-single photon two-dimensional space using quantum detector tomography and evaluate the achievable discrimination error probability from the reconstructed measurement operators. We furthermore derive the minimum error rate obtainable with Gaussian transformations and homodyne detection. Our proof of principle experiment shows that the Kennedy receiver can achieve a discrimination error surpassing homodyne detection.
  • The resonant enhancement of both mechanical and optical response in microcavity optomechanical devices allows exquisitely sensitive measurements of stimuli such as acceleration, mass and magnetic fields. In this work, we show that quantum correlated light can improve the performance of such sensors, increasing both their sensitivity and their bandwidth. Specifically, we develop a silicon-chip based cavity optomechanical magnetometer that incorporates phase squeezed light to suppress optical shot noise. At frequencies where shot noise is the dominant noise source this allows a 20% improvement in magnetic field sensitivity. Furthermore, squeezed light broadens the range of frequencies at which thermal noise dominates, which has the effect of increasing the overall sensor bandwidth by 50%. These proof-of-principle results open the door to apply quantum correlated light more broadly in chip-scale sensors and devices.
  • We demonstrate a technique for precision sensing of temperature or the magnetic field by simultaneously driving two hyperfine transitions involving distinct electronic states of the nitrogen-vacancy center in diamond. Frequency modulation of both driving fields is used with either the same or opposite phase, resulting in the immunity to fluctuations in either the magnetic field or the temperature, respectively. In this way, a sensitivity of 1.4 nT Hz$^{-1/2}$ or 430 $\mu$K Hz$^{-1/2}$ is demonstrated. The presented technique only requires a single frequency demodulator and enables the use of phase-sensitive camera imaging sensors. A simple extension of the method utilizing two demodulators allows for simultaneous, independent, and high-bandwidth monitoring of both the magnetic field and temperature.
  • Phase super-sensitivity is obtained when the sensitivity in a phase measurement goes beyond the quantum shot noise limit, whereas super-resolution is obtained when the interference fringes in an interferometer are narrower than half the input wavelength. Here we show experimentally that these two features can be simultaneously achieved using a relatively simple setup based on Gaussian states and homodyne measurement. Using 430 photons shared between a coherent- and a squeezed vacuum state, we demonstrate a 22-fold improvement in the phase resolution while we observe a 1.7-fold improvement in the sensitivity. In contrast to previous demonstrations of super-resolution and super-sensitivity, this approach is fully deterministic.
  • In all practical communication channels, the code word consist of Gaussian states and the measurement strategy is often a Gaussian detector such as homodyning or heterodyning. In this paper we investigate the communication performance using a phase conjugated alphabet and joint Gaussian detection in an phase-insensitive amplifying channel. We find that a communication scheme consisting of a phase conjugating alphabet of coherent states and a joint detection strategy, significantly outperforms a standard coherent state strategy based in individual detection. Moreover, we show that the performance can be further enhanced by using entanglement and that the performance is completely independent on the gain of the phase-insensitively amplifying channel.
  • We demonstrate magnetic field sensing using an ensemble of nitrogen-vacancy centers by recording the variation in the pump-light absorption due to the spin-polarization dependence of the total ground state population. Using a 532 nm pump laser, we measure the absorption of native nitrogen-vacancy centers in a chemical vapor deposited diamond placed in a resonant optical cavity. For a laser pump power of 0.4 W and a cavity finesse of 45, we obtain a noise floor of $\sim$ 100 nT/$\sqrt{\textrm{Hz}}$ spanning a bandwidth up to 125 Hz. We project a photon shot-noise-limited sensitivity of $\sim$ 1 pT/$\sqrt{\textrm{Hz}}$ by optimizing the nitrogen-vacancy concentration and the detection method.
  • Ensembles of nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond are a highly promising platform for high-sensitivity magnetometry, whose efficacy is often based on efficiently generating and monitoring magnetic-field dependent infrared fluorescence. Here we report on an increased sensing efficiency with the use of a 532-nm resonant confocal cavity and a microwave resonator antenna for measuring the local magnetic noise density using the intrinsic nitrogen-vacancy concentration of a chemical-vapor deposited single-crystal diamond. We measure a near-shot-noise-limited magnetic noise floor of 200 pT/$\sqrt{\text{Hz}}$ spanning a bandwidth up to 159 Hz, and an extracted sensitivity of approximately 3 nT/$\sqrt{\text{Hz}}$, with further enhancement limited by the noise floor of the lock-in amplifier and the laser damage threshold of the optical components. Exploration of the microwave and optical pump-rate parameter space demonstrates a linewidth-narrowing regime reached by virtue of using the optical cavity, allowing an enhanced sensitivity to be achieved, despite an unoptimized collection efficiency of <2 %, and a low nitrogen-vacancy concentration of about 0.2 ppb.
  • Sensitive, real-time optical magnetometry with nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond relies on accurate imaging of small ($\ll 10^{-2}$) fractional fluorescence changes across the diamond sample. We discuss the limitations on magnetic-field sensitivity resulting from the limited number of photoelectrons that a camera can record in a given time. Several types of camera sensors are analyzed and the smallest measurable magnetic-field change is estimated for each type. We show that most common sensors are of a limited use in such applications, while certain highly specific cameras allow to achieve nanotesla-level sensitivity in $1$~s of a combined exposure. Finally, we demonstrate the results obtained with a lock-in camera that pave the way for real-time, wide-field magnetometry at the nanotesla level and with micrometer resolution.
  • Magnetometers based on ensembles of nitrogen-vacancy centres are a promising platform for continuously sensing static and low-frequency magnetic fields. Their combination with phase-sensitive (lock-in) detection creates a highly versatile sensor with a sensitivity that is proportional to the derivative of the optical magnetic resonance lock-in spectrum, which is in turn dependant on the lock-in modulation parameters. Here we study the dependence of the lock-in spectral slope on the modulation of the spin-driving microwave field. Given the presence of the intrinsic nitrogen hyperfine spin transitions, we experimentally show that when the ratio between the hyperfine linewidth and their separation is $\gtrsim 1/4$, square-wave based frequency modulation generates the steepest slope at modulation depths exceeding the separation of the hyperfine lines, compared to sine-wave based modulation. We formulate a model for calculating lock-in spectra which shows excellent agreement with our experiments, and which shows that an optimum slope is achieved when the linewidth/separation ratio is $\lesssim 1/4$ and the modulation depth is less then the resonance linewidth, irrespective of the modulation function used.
  • Nanodiamonds (NDs) hosting optically active defects are an important technical material for applications in quantum sensing, biological imaging, and quantum optics. The negatively charged silicon vacancy (SiV) defect is known to fluoresce in molecular sized NDs (1 to 6 nm) and its spectral properties depend on the quality of the surrounding host lattice. This defect is therefore a good probe to investigate the material properties of small NDs. Here we report unprecedented narrow optical transitions for SiV colour centers hosted in nanodiamonds produced using a novel high-pressure high-temperature (HPHT) technique. The SiV zero-phonon lines were measured to have an inhomogeneous distribution of 1.05 nm at 5 K across a sample of numerous NDs. Individual spectral lines as narrow as 354 MHz were measured for SiV centres in nanodiamonds smaller than 200 nm, which is four times narrower than the best SiV line previously reported for nanodiamonds. Correcting for apparent spectral diffusion yielded a homogeneous linewith of about 200 MHz, which is close to the width limit imposed by the radiative lifetime. These results demonstrate that the direct HPHT synthesis technique is capable of producing nanodiamonds with high crystal lattice quality, which are therefore a valuable technical material.
  • We determine the theoretical limits to squeezing-enhanced measurement sensitivity of mechanical motion in a cavity optomechanical system. The motion of a mechanical resonator is transduced onto quadrature fluctuations of a cavity optical field and a measurement is performed on the optical field exiting the cavity. We compare measurement sensitivities obtained with coherent probing and quantum-enhanced probing of the mechanical motion, i.e. the coherent probe field carries vacuum states and quadrature squeezed vacuum states at sideband frequencies, respectively. We find that quantum-enhanced probing provides little to no improvement in motion sensing for resonators in the unresolved sideband regime but may significantly increase measurement sensitivities for resonators in the resolved sideband regime.
  • Existing experimental implementations of continuous-variable quantum key distribution require shot-noise limited operation, achieved with shot-noise limited lasers. However, loosening this requirement on the laser source would allow for cheaper, potentially integrated systems. Here, we implement a theoretically proposed prepare-and-measure continuous-variable protocol and experimentally demonstrate the robustness of it against preparation noise stemming for instance from technical laser noise. Provided that direct reconciliation techniques are used in the post-processing we show that for small distances large amounts of preparation noise can be tolerated in contrast to reverse reconciliation where the key rate quickly drops to zero. Our experiment thereby demonstrates that quantum key distribution with non-shot-noise limited laser diodes might be feasible.
  • The notions of qubits and coherent states correspond to different physical systems and are described by specific formalisms. Qubits are associated with a two-dimensional Hilbert space and can be illustrated on the Bloch sphere. In contrast, the underlying Hilbert space of coherent states is infinite-dimensional and the states are typically represented in phase space. For the particular case of binary coherent state alphabets these otherwise distinct formalisms can equally be applied. We capitalize this formal connection to analyse the properties of optimally cloned binary coherent states. Several practical and near-optimal cloning schemes are discussed and the associated fidelities are compared to the performance of the optimal cloner.
  • The ability to perform computations on encrypted data is a powerful tool for protecting a client's privacy, especially in today's era of cloud and distributed computing. In terms of privacy, the best solutions that classical techniques can achieve are unfortunately not unconditionally secure in the sense that they are dependent on a hacker's computational power. Here we theoretically investigate, and experimentally demonstrate with Gaussian displacement and squeezing operations, a quantum solution that achieves the unconditional security of a user's privacy using the practical technology of continuous variables. We demonstrate losses of up to 10 km both ways between the client and the server and show that security can still be achieved. Our approach offers a number of practical benefits, which can ultimately allow for the potential widespread adoption of this quantum technology in future cloud-based computing networks.
  • In a direct detection scheme we observed 7.8 dB of twin-beam squeezing for multi-mode two-color squeezed vacuum generated via parametric down conversion. Applying post-selection, we conditionally prepared a sub-Poissonian state of light containing $6.3\cdot10^5$ photons per pulse on the average with the Fano factor $0.63\pm0.01$. The scheme can be considered as the heralded preparation of pulses with the mean energy varying between tens and hundreds of fJ and the uncertainty considerably below the shot-noise level. Such pulses can be used in metrology (for instance, for radiometers calibration) as well as for probing multi-mode nonlinear optical effects.
  • Laser cooling is a fundamental technique used in primary atomic frequency standards, quantum computers, quantum condensed matter physics and tests of fundamental physics, among other areas. It has been known since the early 1990s that laser cooling can, in principle, be improved by using squeezed light as an electromagnetic reservoir; while quantum feedback control using a squeezed light probe is also predicted to allow improved cooling. Here, we implement quantum feedback control of a micro-mechanical oscillator for the first time with a squeezed probe field. This allows quantum-enhanced feedback cooling with a measurement rate greater than it is possible with classical light, and a consequent reduction in the final oscillator temperature. Our results have significance for future applications in areas ranging from quantum information networks, to quantum-enhanced force and displacement measurements and fundamental tests of macroscopic quantum mechanics.
  • Squeezed light generation has come of age. Significant advances on squeezed light generation has been made over the last 30 years - from the initial, conceptual experiment in 1985 till todays top- tuned, application-oriented setups. Here we review the main experimental platforms for generating quadrature squeezed light that has been investigated the last 30 years.
  • In recent years the controlled coupling of single photon emitters to propagating surface plasmons has been intensely studied, which is fueled by the prospect of a giant photonic non-linearity on a nano-scaled platform. In this article we will review the recent progress on coupling single emitters to nano-wires towards the construction of a new platform for strong light-matter interaction. The control over such a platform might open new doors for quantum information processing and quantum sensing at the nanoscale, and for the study of fundamental physics in the ultra-strong coupling regime.
  • We present a novel proposal for generating quantum superpositions of macroscopically distinct states of a bulk mechanical oscillator, compatible with existing optomechanical devices operating in the readily achievable bad-cavity limit. The scheme is based on a pulsed cavity optomechanical quantum non-demolition (QND) interaction, driven by displaced non-Gaussian states, and measurement-induced feedback, avoiding the need for strong single-photon optomechanical coupling. Furthermore, we show that single-quadrature cooling of the mechanical oscillator is sufficient for efficient state preparation, and we outline a three-pulse protocol comprising a sequence of QND interactions for squeezing-enhanced cooling, state preparation, and tomography.
  • Most continuous-variable quantum key distribution schemes are based on the Gaussian modulation of coherent states followed by continuous quadrature detection using homodyne detectors. In all previous schemes, the Gaussian modulation has been carried out in conjugate quadratures thus requiring two independent modulators for their implementations. Here, we propose and experimentally test a largely simplified scheme in which the Gaussian modulation is performed in a single quadrature. The scheme is shown to be asymptotically secure against collective attacks, and considers asymmetric preparation and excess noise. A single-quadrature modulation approach renders the need for a costly amplitude modulator unnecessary, and thus facilitates commercialization of continuous-variable quantum key distribution.
  • We consider two remote parties connected to a relay by two quantum channels. To generate a secret key, they transmit coherent states to the relay, where the states are subject to a continuous-variable (CV) Bell detection. We study the ideal case where Alice's channel is lossless, i.e., the relay is locally situated in her lab and the Bell detection is performed with unit efficiency. This configuration allows us to explore the optimal performances achievable by CV measurement-device-independent (MDI) quantum key distribution (QKD). This corresponds to the limit of a trusted local relay, where the detection loss can be re-scaled. Our theoretical analysis is confirmed by an experimental simulation where 10^-4 secret bits per use can potentially be distributed at 170km assuming ideal reconciliation.
  • In a comment, Xu, Curty, Qi, Qian, and Lo claimed that discrete-variable (DV) measurement device independent (MDI) quantum key distribution (QKD) would compete with its continuous-variable (CV) counterpart at metropolitan distances. Actually, Xu et al.'s analysis supports exactly the opposite by showing that the experimental rate of our CV protocol (achieved with practical room-temperature devices) remains one order of magnitude higher than their purely-numerical and over-optimistic extrapolation for qubits, based on nearly-ideal parameters and cryogenic detectors (unsuitable solutions for a realistic metropolitan network, which is expected to run on cheap room-temperature devices, potentially even mobile). The experimental rate of our protocol (expressed as bits per relay use) is confirmed to be two-three orders of magnitude higher than the rate of any realistic simulation of practical DV-MDI-QKD over short-medium distances. Of course this does not mean that DV-MDI-QKD networks should not be investigated or built, but increasing their rate is a non-trivial practical problem clearly beyond the analysis of Xu et al. Finally, in order to clarify the facts, we also refute a series of incorrect arguments against CV-MDI-QKD and, more generally, CV-QKD, which were made by Xu et al. with the goal of supporting their thesis.
  • Von Neumann projections are the main operations by which information can be extracted from the quantum to the classical realm. They are however static processes that do not adapt to the states they measure. Advances in the field of adaptive measurement have shown that this limitation can be overcome by "wrapping" the von Neumann projectors in a higher-dimensional circuit which exploits the interplay between measurement outcomes and measurement settings. Unfortunately, the design of adaptive measurement has often been ad hoc and setup-specific. We shall here develop a unified framework for designing optimized measurements. Our approach is two-fold: The first is algebraic and formulates the problem of measurement as a simple matrix diagonalization problem. The second is algorithmic and models the optimal interaction between measurement outcomes and measurement settings as a cascaded network of conditional probabilities. Finally, we demonstrate that several figures of merit, such as Bell factors, can be improved by optimized measurements. This leads us to the promising observation that measurement detectors which---taken individually---have a low quantum efficiency can be be arranged into circuits where, collectively, the limitations of inefficiency are compensated for.
  • We consider a quantum relay which is used by two parties to perform several continuous-variable protocols: Entanglement swapping, distillation, quantum teleportation, and quantum key distribution. The theory of these protocols is extended to a non-Markovian model of decoherence characterized by correlated Gaussian noise. Even if bipartite entanglement is completely lost at the relay, we show that the various protocols can progressively be reactivated by the separable noise-correlations of the environment. In fact, above a critical amount, these correlations are able to restore the distribution of quadripartite entanglement, which can be localized into an exploitable bipartite form by the action of the relay. Our findings are confirmed by a proof-of-principle experiment and show the potential advantages of non-Markovian effects in a quantum network architecture.