• We review results from our monitoring observations of several lensed quasars performed in the optical, UV, and X-ray bands. Modeling of the multi-wavelength light curves provides constraints on the extent of the optical, UV, and X-ray emission regions. One of the important results of our analysis is that the optical sizes as inferred from the microlensing analysis are significantly larger than those predicted by the theoretical-thin-disk estimate. In a few cases we also constrain the slope of the size-wavelength relation. Our size constraints of the soft and hard X-ray emission regions of quasars indicate that in some objects of our sample the hard X-ray emission region is more compact than the soft and in others the soft emission region is smaller. This difference may be the result of the relative strengths of the disk-reflected (harder and extended) versus corona-direct (softer and compact) components in the quasars of our sample. Finally, we present the analysis of several strong microlensing events where we detect an evolution of the relativistic Fe line profile as the magnification caustic traverses the accretion disk. These caustic crossings are used to provide constraints on the innermost stable circular orbit (ISCO) radius and the accretion disk inclination angle of the black hole in quasar RX J1131-1231.
  • We use gravitational microlensing of the four images of the z=0.658 quasar RXJ1131-1231 to measure the sizes of the optical and X-ray emission regions of the quasar. The (face-on) scale length of the optical disk at rest frame 400 nm is 1.3 10^15cm, while the half-light radius of the rest frame 0.3-17 keV X-ray emission is 2.3 10^14cm. The formal uncertainties are factors of 1.6 and 2.0, respectively. With the exception of the lower limit on the X-ray size, the results are very stable against any changes in the priors used in the analysis. Based on the Hbeta line-width, we estimate that the black hole mass is ~10^8 Msun, which corresponds to a gravitational radius of r_g~2 10^13 cm. Thus, the X-ray emission is emerging on scales of ~10r_g and the 400 nm emission on scales of ~70 r_g. A standard thin disk of this size should be significantly brighter than observed. Possible solutions are to have a flatter temperature profile or to scatter a large fraction of the optical flux on larger scales after it is emitted. While our calculations were not optimized to constrain the dark matter fraction in the lens galaxy, dark matter dominated models are favored. With well-sampled optical and X-ray light curves over a broad range of frequencies there will be no difficulty in extending our analysis to completely map the structure of the accretion disk as a function of wavelength.
  • We present 426 epochs of optical monitoring data spanning 1000 days from December 2003 to June 2006 for the gravitationally lensed quasar SDSS J1004+4112. The time delay between the A and B images is 38.4+/-2.0 days in the expected sense that B leads A and the overall time ordering is C-B-A-D-E. The measured delay invalidates all published models. The models failed because they neglected the perturbations from cluster member galaxies. Models including the galaxies can fit the data well, but strong conclusions about the cluster mass distribution should await the measurement of the longer, and less substructure sensitive, delays of the C and D images. For these images, a CB delay of 681+/-15 days is plausible but requires confirmation, while CB and AD delays of >560 days and > 800 days are required. We clearly detect microlensing of the A/B images, with the delay-corrected flux ratios changing from B-A=0.44+/-0.01 mag in the first season to 0.29+/-0.01 mag in the second season and 0.32+/-0.01 mag in the third season.