• Bars are common galactic structures in the local universe that play an important role in the secular evolution of galaxies, including the Milky Way. In particular, the velocity distribution of individual stars in our galaxy is useful to shed light on stellar dynamics, and provides information complementary to that inferred from the integrated light of external galaxies. However, since a wide variety of models reproduce the distribution of velocity and the velocity dispersion observed in the Milky Way, we look for signatures of the bar on higher-order moments of the line-of-sight velocity ($V_{los}$) distribution. We make use of two different numerical simulations --one that has developed a bar and one that remains nearly axisymmetric-- to compare them with observations in the latest APOGEE data release (SDSS DR14). This comparison reveals three interesting structures that support the notion that the Milky Way is a barred galaxy. A high skewness region found at positive longitudes constrains the orientation angle of the bar, and is incompatible with the orientation of the bar at $\ell=0^\circ$ proposed in previous studies. We also analyse the $V_{los}$ distributions in three regions, and introduce the Hellinger distance to quantify the differences among them. Our results show a strong non-Gaussian distribution both in the data and in the barred model, confirming the qualitative conclusions drawn from the velocity maps. In contrast to earlier work, we conclude it is possible to infer the presence of the bar from the kurtosis distribution.
  • Recently a theory about the formation of over-densities of stars along tidal tails of globular clusters has been presented, this theory predicts the position and time of formation of such over-densities and was successfully tested with N-body simulations of globular clusters in a point mass galactic potential. In this work we present a comparison between this theory and our simulations using a dwarf galaxy orbiting two differently shaped dark matter halos to study the effects of a cored and a cuspy halo on the formation and evolution of tidal tails. We find no difference using a cuspy or a cored halo, however, we find an intriguing asymmetry between the leading and trailing arm of the tidal tails. The trailing arm grows faster than the leading arm. This asymmetry is seen in the distance to first over-density and its size as well. We establish a relation between the distance to the first over-density and the size of this over-density.
  • Dwarf spheroidal galaxies are regarded as the basic building blocks in the formation of larger galaxies and are believed to be the most dark matter dominated systems known in the Universe. There are several models that attempt to explain their formation and evolution, but they have problems to model the formation of isolated dwarf spheroidal galaxies. Here, we will explain a possible formation scenario in which star clusters form inside the dark matter halo of a dwarf spheroidal galaxy. Those star clusters suffer from low star formation efficiency and dissolve while orbiting inside the dark matter halo. Thereby, they build the faint luminous components that we observe in dwarf spheroidal galaxies. In this paper we study this model by adding different star formation histories to the simulations to compare the results with our previous work and observational data to show that we can explain the formation of dwarf spheroidal galaxies.
  • A multiwavelength investigation of the southern infrared dust bubble CS51 is presented in this paper. We probe the associated ionized, cold dust, molecular and stellar components. Radio continuum emission mapped at 610 and 1300 MHz, using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope, India, reveal the presence of three compact emission components (A, B, and C) apart from large-scale diffuse emission within the bubble interior. Radio spectral index map show the coexistence of thermal and non-thermal emission components. Modified blackbody fits to the thermal dust emission using Herschel PACS and SPIRE data is performed to generate dust temperature and column density maps. We identify five dust clumps associated with CS51 with masses and radius in the range 810 - 4600 M{\sun} and 1.0 - 1.9 pc, respectively. We further construct the column density probability distribution functions of the surrounding cold dust which display the impact of ionization feedback from high-mass stars. The estimated dynamical and fragmentation timescales indicate the possibility of collect and collapse mechanism in play at the bubble border. Molecular line emission from the MALT90 survey is used to understand the nature of two clumps which show signatures of expansion of CS51.
  • We investigate the evolution of mass segregation in initially sub-structured young embedded star clusters with two different background potentials mimicking the gas. Our clusters are initially in virial or sub-virial global states and have different initial distributions for the most massive stars: randomly placed, initially mass segregated or even inverse segregation. By means of N-body simulation we follow their evolution for 5 Myr. We measure the mass segregation using the minimum spanning tree method Lambda_MSR and an equivalent restricted method. Despite this variety of different initial conditions, we find that our stellar distributions almost always settle very fast into a mass segregated and more spherical configuration, suggesting that once we see a spherical or nearly spherical embedded star cluster, we can be sure it is mass segregated no matter what the real initial conditions were. We, furthermore, report under which circumstances this process can be more rapid or delayed, respectively.
  • We attempt to find a progenitor for the ultra-faint object Segue 1 under the assumption that it formed as a dark matter free star cluster in the past. We look for orbits, using the elongation of Segue 1 on the sky as a tracer of its path. Those orbits are followed backwards in time to find the starting points of our N-body simulations. The successful orbit, with which we can reproduce Segue 1 has a proper motion of mu_alpha = -0.19 mas/yr and mu_delta = -1.9 mas/yr, placing Segue 1 near its apo-galacticon today. Our best fitting model has an initial mass of 6224 Msun and an initial scale-length of 5.75 pc.
  • An understanding of the mass build-up in galaxies over time necessitates tracing the evolution of cold gas (molecular and atomic) in galaxies. To that end, we have conducted a pilot study called CO Observations with the LMT of the Blind Ultra-Deep H I Environment Survey (COOL BUDHIES). We have observed 23 galaxies in and around the two clusters Abell 2192 (z = 0.188) and Abell 963 (z = 0.206), where 12 are cluster members and 11 are slightly in the foreground or background, using about 28 total hours on the Redshift Search Receiver (RSR) on the Large Millimeter Telescope (LMT) to measure the $^{12}$CO J = 1 --> 0 emission line and obtain molecular gas masses. These new observations provide a unique opportunity to probe both the molecular and atomic components of galaxies as a function of environment beyond the local Universe. For our sample of 23 galaxies, nine have reliable detections (S/N$\geq$3.6) of the $^{12}$CO line, and another six have marginal detections (2.0 < S/N < 3.6). For the remaining eight targets we can place upper limits on molecular gas masses roughly between $10^9$ and $10^{10} M_\odot$. Comparing our results to other studies of molecular gas, we find that our sample is significantly more abundant in molecular gas overall, when compared to the stellar and the atomic gas component, and our median molecular gas fraction lies about $1\sigma$ above the upper limits of proposed redshift evolution in earlier studies. We discuss possible reasons for this discrepancy, with the most likely conclusion being target selection and Eddington bias.
  • The present literature does not give a satisfactory answer to the question about the nature of the "Antlia galaxy cluster". The radial velocities of galaxies found in the region around the giant ellipticals NGC 3258/3268 range from about 1000 km/s to 4000 km/s. We characterise this region and its possible kinematical and population substructure. We have obtained VLT--VIMOS multi-object spectra of the galaxy population in the inner part of the Antlia cluster and measure radial velocities for 45 potential members. We supplement our galaxy sample with literature data, ending up with 105 galaxy velocities. We find a large radial velocity dispersion for the entire sample as reported in previous papers. However, we find three groups at about 1900 km/s, 2800 km/s, and 3700 km/s, which we interpret as differences in the recession velocities rather than peculiar velocities. The high radial velocity dispersion of galaxies in the Antlia region reflects a considerable extension along the line of sight.
  • We present optical imaging and long slit spectroscopic observations of 9 luminous type 2 AGNs within the redshift range 0.3<z<0.6 based on VLT-FORS2 data. Most objects (6/9) are high luminosity Seyfert 2, and three are type 2 quasars (QSO2), with our sample extending to lower luminosity than previous works. Seven out of nine objects (78%) show morphological evidence for interactions or mergers in the form of disturbed morphologies and/or peculiar features such as tidal tails, amorphous halos, or compact emission line knots. The detection rate of morphological evidence for interaction is consistent with those found during previous studies of QSO2 at similar z, suggesting that the merger rate is independent of AGN power at the high end of the AGN luminosity function. We find the emission line flux spatial profiles are often dominated by the often spatially unresolved central source. In addition, all but one of our sample is associated with much fainter, extended line emission. We find these extended emission line structures have a variety of origins and ionization mechanisms: star forming companions, tidal features, or extended ionized nebulae. AGN related processes dominate the excitation of the nuclear gas. Stellar photoionization sometimes plays a role in extended structures often related to mergers/interactions.
  • The tidal disruption of the Sagittarius dwarf Spheroidal galaxy (Sgr dSph) is producing the most prominent substructure in the Milky Way (MW) halo, the Sagittarius Stream. Aside from field stars, the Sgr dSph is suspected to have lost a number of globular clusters (GC). Many Galactic GC are suspected to have originated in the Sgr dSph. While for some candidates an origin in the Sgr dSph has been confirmed due to chemical similarities, others exist whose chemical composition has never been investigated. NGC 5053 and NGC 5634 are two among these scarcely studied Sgr dSph candidate-member clusters. To characterize their composition we analyzed one giant star in NGC 5053, and two in NGC 5634. We analize high-resolution and signal-to-noise spectra by means of the MyGIsFOS code, determining atmospheric parameters and abundances for up to 21 species between O and Eu. The abundances are compared with those of MW halo field stars, of "unassociated" MW halo globulars, and of the metal poor Sgr dSph main body population. We derive a metallicity of [FeII/H]=-2.26+-0.10 for NGC 5053, and of [FeI/H]=-1.99+-0.075 and -1.97+-0.076 for the two stars in NGC 5634. This makes NGC 5053 one of the most metal poor globular clusters in the MW. Both clusters display an alpha enhancement similar to the one of the halo at comparable metallicity. The two stars in NGC 5634 clearly display the Na-O anticorrelation widespread among MW globulars. Most other abundances are in good agreement with standard MW halo trends. The chemistry of the Sgr dSph main body populations is similar to the one of the halo at low metallicity. It is thus difficult to discriminate between an origin of NGC 5053 and NGC 5634 in the Sgr dSph, and one in the MW. However, the abundances of these clusters do appear closer to that of Sgr dSph than of the halo, favoring an origin in the Sgr dSph system.
  • We investigate early black hole (BH) growth through the methodical search for $z\gtrsim5$ AGN in the $Chandra$ Deep Field South. We base our search on the $Chandra$ 4-Ms data with flux limits of $9.1\times\ 10^{-18}$ (soft, 0.5 - 2 keV) and $5.5\times\ 10^{-17}\ \mathrm{erg}\ \mathrm{s}^{-1}\ \mathrm{cm}^{-2}$ (hard, 2 - 8 keV). At $z\sim5$ this corresponds to luminosities as low as $\sim10^{42}$ ($\sim10^{43}$) $\mathrm{erg}\ \mathrm{s}^{-1}$ in the soft (hard) band and should allow us to detect Compton-thin AGN with $M_\mathrm{BH}>10^7 M_{\odot}$ and Eddington ratios > 0.1. Our field ($0.03~\mathrm{deg}^2$) contains over 600 $z\sim5$ Lyman Break Galaxies. Based on lower redshift relations we would expect $\sim20$ of them to host AGN. After combining the $Chandra$ data with GOODS/ACS, CANDELS/WFC3 and $Spitzer$/IRAC data, the sample consists of 58 high-redshift candidates. We run a photometric redshift code, stack the GOODS/ACS data, apply colour criteria and the Lyman Break Technique and use the X-ray Hardness Ratio. We combine our tests and using additional data find that all sources are most likely at low redshift. We also find five X-ray sources without a counterpart in the optical or infrared which might be spurious detections. We conclude that our field does not contain any convincing $z\gtrsim5$ AGN. Explanations for this result include a low BH occupation fraction, a low AGN fraction, short, super-Eddington growth modes, BH growth through BH-BH mergers or in optically faint galaxies. By searching for $z\gtrsim5$ AGN we are setting the foundation for constraining early BH growth and seed formation scenarios.
  • Hercules is a dwarf spheroidal satellite of the Milky Way, found at a distance of about 138 kpc, and showing evidence of tidal disruption. It is very elongated and exhibits a velocity gradient of 16 +/- 3 km/s/kpc. Using this data a possible orbit of Hercules has previously been deduced in the literature. In this study we make use of a novel approach to find a best fit model that follows the published orbit. Instead of using trial and error, we use a systematic approach in order to find a model that fits multiple observables simultaneously. As such, we investigate a much wider parameter range of initial conditions and ensure we have found the best match possible. Using a dark matter free progenitor that undergoes tidal disruption, our best-fit model can simultaneously match the observed luminosity, central surface brightness, effective radius, velocity dispersion, and velocity gradient of Hercules. However, we find it is impossible to reproduce the observed elongation and the position angle of Hercules at the same time in our models. This failure persists even when we vary the duration of the simulation significantly, and consider a more cuspy density distribution for the progenitor. We discuss how this suggests that the published orbit of Hercules is very likely to be incorrect.
  • We present radial velocities (from Gemini/GMOS) of the second sample of ultra-compact dwarfs (UCDs) and bright globular clusters (GCs) in the Antlia cluster. Twenty-three objects are located around the giant elliptical NGC 3268, and one is close to the fainter lenticular NGC 3273. Together with previously found UCDs around NGC 3258 a total of 35 UCDs and bright GCs has been now identified in the Antlia cluster. Their colours and magnitudes are compared with those of the nuclei of dE,N galaxies already confirmed as Antlia members. For a subsample that lie on ACS images and are brighter than M_V = -9 mag, the effective radii (R_eff) have been measured, the maximum radius being approximately 10 pc. In addition to the radial velocity sample, we find 10 objects in the magnitude range corresponding to GCs but with 10 < R_eff < 17 pc, resembling the so-called `extended clusters'. By number and magnitude, the new UCDs fit to the GC luminosity function, supporting their interpretation as bright GCs. Additionally, we use a tracer mass estimator to calculate the mass enclosed up to ~47 kpc from NGC 3268, which results in 2.7 x 10^12 M_o.
  • We present the first compact stellar systems with luminosities in the range of ultra-compact dwarfs (UCDs), discovered in the Antlia galaxy cluster (-10.5 < M_V < -11.6). The magnitude limit between UCDs and globular clusters (CGs) is discussed. By means of imaging from VLT (FORS1), CTIO (MOSAIC), and the HST (ACS) archive, eleven UCDs/bright GCs are selected on the basis of photometry and confirmed as Antlia members through radial velocities measured on new GEMINI (GMOS-S) spectra. In addition, nine UCD candidates are identified taking into account properties derived from their surface brightness profiles. All of them, members and candidates, are located in the proximity of NGC\,3258, one of the two brightest elliptical galaxies in the cluster core. Antlia UCDs in this sample present absolute magnitudes fainter than M_V ~ -11.6 mag and most of them have colours within the blue GC range, falling only two within the red GC range. Effective radii measured for the ones lying on the ACS field are in the range R_eff = 3 - 11 pc and are similar to equivalent objects in other clusters, obtained from the literature. The UCD sample shares the same behaviour on the size-luminosity plane: a linear relation between R_eff and M_V is present for UCDs brighter than M_V ~ -10.5 - -11 mag while no trend is detected for fainter ones, that have an approximately constant R_eff. The projected spatial distribution of UCDs, GCs and X-ray emission points to an ongoing merger between two Antlia groups, dominated by NGC 3258 and NGC 3268. Nuclei of dwarf elliptical galaxies and blue UCDs share the same locus on the colour-magnitude diagram, supporting the hypothesis that some blue UCDs may be remnants of stripped nucleated dwarfs.
  • Context: There is strong evidence that globular cluster systems (GCSs) of massive galaxies are largely assembled by infall/accretion processes. Therefore, we expect the GCSs of isolated elliptical galaxies to be poor. Alhough not completely isolated, NGC 7507 is a massive field elliptical galaxy with an apparently very low dark matter content. Aims: We determine the richness, the colour distribution, and the structural properties of the GCS of NGC 7507. Methods: We perform wide-field Washington photometry with data obtained with the MOSAIC II camera at the 4m-Blanco telescope, CTIO. Results: The GCS is very poor with S_N ~ 0.6. We identify three subpopulations with peaks at (C-T1) colours of 1.21, 1.42, and 1.72. The bluest population may represent the old, metal-poor component. This interpretation is supported by its shallow density profile. The red population is more concentrated, resembling the galaxy light. The intermediate-colour population is strongly peaked in colour and we interpret this population as the signature of a starburst, whose age depends on the metallicity, but should be quite old, since no signatures of a merger are identifiable. In addition, we find a main sequence in the stellar foreground population, which we attribute to the Sagittarius dwarf tidal stream. Conclusions: The extraordinarily poor GCS of NGC 7507, a massive elliptical galaxy, is an illustration of how important the environmental conditions are for producing rich GCSs.
  • Context. The abundance inhomogeneities of light elements observed in Globular Clusters (GCs), and notably the ubiquitous Na-O anti-correlation, are generally interpreted as evidence that GCs comprise several generations of stars. There is an on-going debate as to the nature of the stars which produce the inhomogeneous elements, and investigating the behavior of several elements is a way to shed new light on this problem. Aims. We aim at investigating the Li and Na content of the GC M 4, that is known to have a well defined Na-O anti-correlation. Methods. We obtained moderate resolution (R=17 000-18 700) spectra for 91 main sequence (MS)/sub-giant branch stars of M 4 with the Giraffe spectrograph at the FLAMES/VLT ESO facility. Using model atmospheres analysis we measured lithium and sodium abundances. Results. We detect a weak Li-Na anti-correlation among un-evolved MS stars. One star in the sample, # 37934, shows the remarkably high lithium abundance A(Li)=2.87, compatible with current estimates of the primordial lithium abundance. Conclusions. The shallow slope found for the Li-Na anti-correlation suggests that lithium is produced in parallel to sodium. This evidence, coupled with its sodium-rich nature, suggests that the high lithium abundance of star # 37934 may originate by pollution from a previous generations of stars. The recent detection of a Li-rich dwarf of pollution origin in the globular cluster NGC 6397 may also point in this direction. Still, no clear cut evidence is available against a possible preservation of the primordial lithium abundance for star # 37934.
  • We show the preliminary analysis of some Galactic stellar clusters (GSCls) candidates and the results of the analysis of two new interesting GSCls found in the "VISTA Variables in the Via Lactea" (VVV) Survey. The VVV photometric data are being used also to improve the knowledge of the Galactic structure. The photometric data are obtained with the new automatic photometric pipeline VVV-SkZ_pipeline.
  • We present a new Bayesian approach to constrain the intrinsic parameters (stellar mass, age) of the eclipsing binary system CEP0227 in the LMC. We computed evolutionary models covering a broad range in chemical compositions and in stellar mass. Independent sets of models were constructed either by neglecting or by including a moderate convective core overshooting (beta=0.2) during central H-burning phases. Models were also constructed either by neglecting or by assuming a canonical (eta=0.4,0.8) or an enhanced (eta=4) mass loss rate. The solutions were computed in three different planes: luminosity-temperature, mass-radius and gravity-temperature. By using the Bayes Factor, we found that the most probable solutions were obtained in the gravity-temperature plane with a Gaussian mass prior distribution. The evolutionary models constructed by assuming a moderate convective core overshooting (beta=0.2) and a canonical mass loss rate (eta=0.4) give stellar masses for the primary Cepheid M=4.14^{+0.04}_{-0.05} M_sun and for the secondary M=4.15^{+0.04}_{-0.05} M_sun that agree at the 1% level with dynamical measurements. Moreover, we found ages for the two components and for the combined system t=151^{+4}_{-3} Myr that agree at the 5% level. The solutions based on evolutionary models that neglect the mass loss attain similar parameters, while those ones based on models that either account for an enhanced mass loss or neglect convective core overshooting have lower Bayes Factors and larger confidence intervals. The dependence on the mass loss rate might be the consequence of the crude approximation we use to mimic this phenomenon. By using the isochrone of the most probable solution and a Gaussian prior on the LMC distance, we found a distance modulus 18.53^{+0.02}_{-0.02} mag and a reddening value E(B-V)= 0.142^{+0.005}_{-0.010} mag that agree well with literature estimates.
  • We quadruple the number of quasars known behind the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) from 55 (42 in the LMC fields of the third phase of the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment (OGLE)) to 200 by spectroscopically confirming 169 (144 new) quasars from a sample of 845 observed candidates in four ~3 deg^2 Anglo-Australian Telescope/AAOmega fields south of the LMC center. The candidates were selected based on their Spitzer mid-infrared colors, X-ray emission, and/or optical variability properties in the database of the OGLE microlensing survey. The contaminating sources can be divided into 115 young stellar objects (YSOs), 17 planetary nebulae (PNe), 39 Be and 24 blue stars, 68 red stars, and 12 objects classed as either YSO/PN or blue star/YSO. There are also 402 targets with either featureless spectra or too low signal-to-noise ratio for source classification. Our quasar sample is 50% (30%) complete at I = 18.6 mag (19.3 mag). The newly discovered active galactic nuclei (AGNs) provide many additional reference points for proper motion studies of the LMC, and the sample includes 10 bright AGNs (I < 18 mag) potentially suitable for absorption line studies. Their primary use, however, is for detailed studies of quasar variability, as they all have long-term, high cadence, continuously growing light curves from the microlensing surveys of the LMC. Completing the existing Magellanic Quasars Survey fields in the LMC and Small Magellanic Cloud should yield a sample of ~700 well-monitored AGNs, and expanding it to the larger regions covered by the OGLE-IV survey should yield a sample of ~3600 AGNs.
  • Recent observations of the dwarf elliptical galaxy Scl-dE1 (Sc22) in the Sculptor group of galaxies revealed an extended globular cluster (Scl-dE1 GC1), which exhibits an extremely large core radius of about 21.2 pc. The authors of the discovery paper speculated on whether this object could reside in its own dark matter halo and/or if it might have formed through the merging of two or more star clusters. In this paper, we present N-body simulations to explore thoroughly this particular formation scenario. We follow the merger of two star clusters within dark matter haloes of a range of masses (as well as in the absence of a dark matter halo). In order to obtain a remnant which resembles the observed extended star cluster, we find that the star formation efficiency has to be quite high (around 33 per cent) and the dark matter halo, if present at all, has to be of very low mass, i.e. raising the mass to light ratio of the object within the body of the stellar distribution by at most a factor of a few. We also find that expansion of a single star cluster following mass loss provides another viable formation path. Finally, we show that future measurements of the velocity dispersion of this system may be able to distinguish between the various scenarios we have explored.
  • It has recently been suggested that the peculiar cluster Pal 1 is associated to the Canis Major dwarf galaxy, which existence is still at the center of a debate. Our first measurement of the cluster's chemical abundance ratios allows us to examine this association and to advance further in the clarification of Pal 1 possible origin.
  • Symbiotic X-ray Binaries (SyXBs) are a recently discovered subclass of Low Mass X-ray Binaries. Their growing number makes them an important evolutionary channel of X-ray Binaries. Our goal is to perform spectral analysis and classification of the proposed counterparts to IGR J16358-4726 and IGR J16393-4643 and to establish their nature as X-ray systems. We used the ESO/UT1 ISAAC spectrograph to observe the proposed counterparts to the two sources, obtaining K-band medium resolution spectra (R = 500) with a S/N > 140. Data reduction was performed with the standard procedure. We classified them by means of comparison with published atlases. We performed SED fitting in order to refine the spectral classification. The two counterparts clearly exhibit the typical features of late-type stars, notably strong CO absorption bands in the red part of the spectrum. With information from previous X-ray studies, we classify the two systems as two new members of the SyXB class. For IGR J16393-4643, we considered the most probable counterpart to the system, although three other objects cannot be completely discarded. For this system, we compared our findings with available orbital solutions, constraining the orbital parameters and the mass of the companion star. By including two more systems, we increased to eight the number of known SyXBs, which emerges as a non-negligible category of galactic X-ray binaries.
  • Robust fast methods to classify variable light curves in large sky surveys are becoming increasingly important. While it is relatively straightforward to identify common periodic stars and particular transient events (supernovae, novae, microlensing), there is no equivalent for non-periodic continuously varying sources (quasars, aperiodic stellar variability). In this paper we present a fast method for modeling and classifying such sources. We demonstrate the method using ~ 86,000 variable sources from the OGLE-II survey of the LMC and ~ 2,700 mid-IR selected quasar candidates from the OGLE-III survey of the LMC and SMC. We discuss the location of common variability classes in the parameter space of the model. In particular we show that quasars occupy a distinct region of variability space, providing a simple quantitative approach to the variability selection of quasars.
  • We study numerically the formation of dSph galaxies. Intense star bursts, e.g. in gas-rich environments, typically produce a few to a few hundred young star clusters, within a region of just a few hundred pc. The dynamical evolution of these star clusters may explain the formation of the luminous component of dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSph). Here we perform a numerical experiment to show that the evolution of star clusters complexes in dark matter haloes can explain the formation of the luminous components of dSph galaxies.
  • Context. NGC 205 is a peculiar dwarf elliptical galaxy hosting in its center a population of young blue stars. Their origin is still matter of debate, the central fresh star formation activity possibly being related to dynamical interactions between NGC 205 and M31. Aims. The star formation history in the central 30\arcsec ($\sim$120 pc) around the NGC 205 central nucleus is investigated in order to obtain clues to the origin of the young stellar population. Methods. Deep HST/ACS CCD photometry is compared with theoretical isochrones and luminosity functions to characterize the stellar content of the region under study and compute the recent SF rate. Results. Our photometry reveals a previously undetected blue plume of young stars clearly distinguishable down to I$\simeq$26. Our analysis suggests that 1.9$\times10^5$ M$_\odot$ were produced between approximately 62 Myr and 335 Myr ago in the NGC 205 inner regions, with a latest minor episode occurring $\sim$25 Myr ago. This implies a star formation rate of $\sim7\times10^{-4}$ M$_\odot$/yr over this period. Conclusions. The excellent fit of the observed luminosity function of young main sequence stars obtained with a model having a constant star formation rate argues against a tidally triggered star formation activity over the last $\sim$300 Myr. Rather, a constant SF may be consistent with NGC 205 being on its first interaction with M 31.