• Black widows and redbacks are binary systems consisting of a millisecond pulsar in a close binary with a companion having matter driven off of its surface by the pulsar wind. X-rays due to an intra-binary shock have been observed from many of these systems, as well as orbital variations in the optical emission from the companion due to heating and tidal distortion. We have been systematically studying these systems in radio, optical and X-rays. Here we will present an overview of X-ray and optical studies of these systems, including new XMM-Newton and NuStar data obtained from several of them, along with new optical photometry.
  • The large field and wavelength range of MUSE is well suited to mapping Galactic planetary nebulae (PN). The bright PN NGC 7009 was observed with MUSE on the VLT during the Science Verification of the instrument in seeing of 0.6". Emission line maps in hydrogen Balmer and Paschen lines were formed from analysis of the MUSE cubes. The measured electron temperature and density from the MUSE cube were employed to predict the theoretical hydrogen line ratios and map the extinction distribution across the nebula. After correction for the interstellar extinction to NGC 7009, the internal dust-to-gas ratio (A_V/N_H) has been mapped for the first time in a PN. The extinction map of NGC 7009 has considerable structure, broadly corresponding to the morphological features of the nebula. A large-scale feature in the extinction map, consisting of a crest and trough, occurs at the rim of the inner shell. The nature of this feature was investigated and instrumental and physical causes considered; no convincing mechanisms were identified to produce this feature, other than mass loss variations in the earlier asymptotic giant branch phase. The dust-to-gas ratio A_V/N_H increases from 0.7 times the interstellar value to >5 times from the centre towards the periphery of the ionized nebula. The integrated A_V/N_H is about 2 times the mean ISM value. It is demonstrated that extinction mapping with MUSE provides a powerful tool for studying the distribution of PN internal dust and the dust-to-gas ratio. (Abridged.)
  • We present upper limits on the X-ray emission for three neutron stars. For PSR J1840$-$1419, with a characteristic age of 16.5 Myr, we calculate a blackbody temperature upper limit (at 99% confidence) of $kT_{\mathrm{bb}}^{\infty}<24^{+17}_{-10}$ eV, making this one of the coolest neutron stars known. PSRs J1814$-$1744 and J1847$-$0130 are both high magnetic field pulsars, with inferred surface dipole magnetic field strengths of $5.5\times10^{13}$ and $9.4\times10^{13}$ G, respectively. Our temperature upper limits for these stars are $kT_{\mathrm{bb}}^{\infty}<123^{+20}_{-33}$ eV and $kT_{\mathrm{bb}}^{\infty}<115^{+16}_{-33}$ eV, showing that these high magnetic field pulsars are not significantly hotter than those with lower magnetic fields. Finally, we put these limits into context by summarizing all temperature measurements and limits for rotation-driven neutron stars.
  • We discuss the possible source of a highly-dispersed radio transient discovered in the Parkes Multi-beam Pulsar Survey (PMPS). The pulse has a dispersion measure of $746\mathrm{cm}^{-3}\mathrm{pc}$, a peak flux density of 400 mJy for the observed pulse width of 7.8 ms, and a flat spectrum across a 288-MHz band centred on 1374 MHz. The flat spectrum suggests that the pulse did not originate from a pulsar, but is consistent with radio-emitting magnetar spectra. The non-detection of subsequent bursts constrains any possible pulsar period to $\gtrsim1$ s, and the pulse energy distribution to being much flatter than typical giant pulse emitting pulsars. The burst is also consistent with the radio signal theorised from an annihilating mini black hole. Extrapolating the PMPS detection rate, provides a limit of $\Omega_{BH}\lesssim5\times10^{-14}$ on the density of these objects. We investigate the consistency of these two scenarios, plus several other possible solutions, as potential explanations to the origin of the pulse, as well as for another transient with similar properties: the Lorimer Burst.
  • Anomalous Microwave Emission (AME) has been previously studied in two well-known molecular clouds and is thought to be due to electric dipole radiation from small spinning dust grains. It is important to measure the polarization properties of this radiation both for component separation in future cosmic microwave background experiments and also to constrain dust models. We have searched for linearly polarized radio emission associated with the $\rho$ Ophiuchi and Perseus molecular clouds using {\it WMAP} 7-year data. We found no significant polarization within an aperture of $2^{\circ}$ diameter. The upper limits on the fractional polarization of spinning dust in the $\rho$ Ophiuchi cloud are 1.7%, 1.6% and 2.6% (at 95% confidence level) at K-, Ka- and Q-bands, respectively. In the Perseus cloud we derived upper limits of 1.4%, 1.9% and 4.7%, at K-, Ka- and Q-bands, respectively; these are similar to those found by L\'opez-Caraballo et al. If AME at high Galactic latitudes has a similarly low level of polarization, this will simplify component separation for CMB polarization measurements. We can also rule out single domain magnetic dipole radiation as the dominant emission mechanism for the 20-40 GHz. The polarization levels are consistent with spinning dust models.
  • We investigate (quantifier-free) spatial constraint languages with equality, contact and connectedness predicates as well as Boolean operations on regions, interpreted over low-dimensional Euclidean spaces. We show that the complexity of reasoning varies dramatically depending on the dimension of the space and on the type of regions considered. For example, the logic with the interior-connectedness predicate (and without contact) is undecidable over polygons or regular closed sets in the Euclidean plane, NP-complete over regular closed sets in three-dimensional Euclidean space, and ExpTime-complete over polyhedra in three-dimensional Euclidean space.
  • Polarized foregrounds are going to be a serious challenge for detecting CMB cosmological B-modes. Both diffuse Galactic emission and extragalactic sources contribute significantly to the power spectrum on large angular scales. At low frequencies, Galactic synchrotron emission will dominate with fractional polarization $\sim 20-40%$ at high latitudes while radio sources can contribute significantly even on large ($\sim 1^{\circ}$) angular scales. Nevertheless, simulations suggest that a detection at the level of $r=0.001$ might be achievable if the foregrounds are not too complex.
  • I make publicly available my literature study into carbon isotope ratios in the Solar System, which formed a part of Woods & Willacy (2009). As far as I know, I have included here all measurements of 12C/13C in Solar System objects (excluding those of Earth) up to and including 1 February 2010. Full references are given. If you use the any of the information here, please reference the paper Woods & Willacy (2009) and this publication.
  • Using large numbers of simulations of the microwave sky, incorporating the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) and the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect due to clusters, we investigate the statistics of the power spectrum at microwave frequencies between spherical multipoles of 1000 and 10000. From these virtual sky maps, we find that the spectrum of the SZ effect has a larger standard deviation by a factor of 3 than would be expected from purely Gaussian realizations, and has a distribution that is significantly skewed towards higher values, especially when small map sizes are used. The standard deviation is also increased by around 10 percent compared to the trispectrum calculation due to the clustering of galaxy clusters. We also consider the effects of including residual point sources and uncertainties in the gas physics. This has implications for the excess power measured in the CMB power spectrum by the Cosmic Background Imager and BIMA experiments. Our results indicate that the observed excess could be explained using a lower value of $\sigma_8$ than previously suggested, however the effect is not enough to match $\sigma_8=0.825$. The uncertainties in the gas physics could also play a substantial role. We have made our maps of the SZ effect available online.
  • We constrain parity-violating interactions to the surface of last scattering using spectra from the QUaD experiment's second and third seasons of observations by searching for a possible systematic rotation of the polarization directions of CMB photons. We measure the rotation angle due to such a possible "cosmological birefringence" to be 0.55 deg. +/- 0.82 deg. (random) +/- 0.5 deg. (systematic) using QUaD's 100 and 150 GHz TB and EB spectra over the multipole range 200 < l < 2000, consistent with null, and constrain Lorentz violating interactions to < 2^-43 GeV (68% confidence limit). This is the best constraint to date on electrodynamic parity violation on cosmological scales.
  • In light of the recently discovered neutron star populations we discuss the various estimates for the birthrates of these populations. We revisit the question as to whether the Galactic supernova rate can account for all of the known groups of isolated neutron stars. After reviewing the rates and population estimates we find that, if the estimates are in fact accurate, the current birthrate and population estimates are not consistent with the Galactic supernova rate. We discuss possible solutions to this problem including whether or not some of the birthrates are hugely over-estimated. We also consider a possible evolutionary scenario between some of the known neutron star classes which could solve this potential birthrate problem.
  • We observe 84 candidate young high-mass sources in the rare isotopologues C17O and C18O to investigate whether there is evidence for depletion (freeze-out) towards these objects. Observations of the J=2-1 transitions of C18O and C17O are used to derive the column densities of gas towards the sources and these are compared with those derived from submillimetre continuum observations. The derived fractional abundance suggests that the CO species show a range of degrees of depletion towards the objects. We then use the radiative transfer code RATRAN to model a selection of the sources to confirm that the spread of abundances is not a result of assumptions made when calculating the column densities. We find a range of abundances of C17O that cannot be accounted for by global variations in either the temperature or dust properties and so must reflect source to source variations. The most likely explanation is that different sources show different degrees of depletion of the CO. Comparison of the C17O linewidths of our sources with those of CS presented by other authors reveal a division of the sources into two groups. Sources with a CS linewidth >3 km/s have low abundances of C17O while sources with narrower CS lines have typically higher C17O abundances. We suggest that this represents an evolutionary trend. Depletion towards these objects shows that the gas remains cold and dense for long enough for the trace species to deplete. The range of depletion measured suggests that these objects have lifetimes of 2-4x10^5 years.
  • The first images of 6.7-GHz methanol masers in the massive star-forming regions DR21(OH) and DR21(OH)N are presented. By measuring the shapes, radial velocities and polarization properties of these masers it is possible to map out the structure, kinematics and magnetic fields in the molecular gas that surrounds newly-formed massive stars. The intrinsic angular resolution of the observations was 43 mas (~100 AU at the distance of DR21), but structures far smaller than this were revealed by employing a non-standard mapping technique. This technique was used in an attempt to identify the physical structure (e.g. disc, outflow, shock) associated with the methanol masers. Two distinct star-forming centres were identified. In DR21(OH) the masers had a linear morphology, and the individual maser spots each displayed an internal velocity gradient in the same direction as the large-scale structure. They were detected at the same position as the OH 1.7-GHz ground-state masers, close to the centre of an outflow traced by CO and class I methanol masers. The shape and velocity gradients of the masers suggests that they probably delineate a shock. In DR21(OH)N the methanol masers trace an arc with a double-peaked profile and a complex velocity gradient. This velocity gradient closely resembles that of a Keplerian disc. The masers in the arc are 4.5% linearly polarized, with a polarization angle that indicates that the magnetic field direction is roughly perpendicular to the large-scale magnetic field in the region (indicated by lower angular resolution measurements of the CO and dust polarization). The suitability of channel-by-channel centroid mapping is discussed as an improved and viable means to maximise the information gained from the data.
  • To measure the 30-GHz flux densities of the 293 sources in the Caltech-Jodrell Bank flat-spectrum (CJF) sample. The measurements are part of an ongoing programme to measure the spectral energy distributions of flat spectrum radio sources and to correlate them with the milliarcsecond structures from VLBI and other measured astrophysical properties. The 30-GHz data were obtained with a twin-beam differencing radiometer system mounted on the Torun 32-m telescope. The system has an angular resolution of 1.2 arcmin. Together with radio spectral data obtained from the literature, the 30-GHz data have enabled us to identify 42 of the CJF sources as Giga-hertz Peaked Spectrum (GPS) sources. Seventeen percent of the sources have rising spectra (alpha > 0) between 5 and 30 GHz.
  • This paper provides a bound on the number of numeric operations (fixed or floating point) that can safely be performed before accuracy is lost. This work has important implications for control systems with safety-critical software, as these systems are now running fast enough and long enough for their errors to impact on their functionality. Furthermore, worst-case analysis would blindly advise the replacement of existing systems that have been successfully running for years. We present here a set of formal theorems validated by the PVS proof assistant. These theorems will allow code analyzing tools to produce formal certificates of accurate behavior. For example, FAA regulations for aircraft require that the probability of an error be below $10^{-9}$ for a 10 hour flight.
  • We present the results of MERLIN polarization mapping of OH masers at 1665 and 1667 MHz towards the Cepheus A star-forming region. The maser emission is spread over a region of 6 arcsec by 10 arcsec, twice the extent previously detected. In contrast to the 22 GHz water masers, the OH masers associated with H II regions show neither clear velocity gradients nor regular structures. We identified ten Zeeman pairs which imply a magnetic field strength along the line-of-sight from -17.3 to +12.7 mG. The magnetic field is organised on the arcsecond scale, pointing towards us in the west and away from us in the east side. The linearly polarized components, detected for the first time, show regularities in the polarization position angles depending on their position. The electric vectors of OH masers observed towards the outer parts of H II regions are consistent with the interstellar magnetic field orientation, while those seen towards the centres of H II regions are parallel to the radio-jets. A Zeeman quartet inside a southern H II region has now been monitored for 25 years; we confirm that the magnetic field decays monotonically over that period.
  • We present multifrequency observations with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) and the Very Large Array (VLA) of a sample of seventeen largely giant radio sources (GRSs). These observations have either helped clarify the radio structures or provided new information at a different frequency. The broad line radio galaxy, J0313+413, has an asymmetric, curved radio jet and a variable radio core, consistent with a moderate angle of inclination to the line of sight. We attempt to identify steep spectrum radio cores (SSCs), which may be a sign of recurrent activity, and find four candidates. If confirmed, this would indicate a trend for SSCs to occur preferentially in GRSs. From the structure and integrated spectra of the sources we suggest that the lobes of emission in J0139+399 and J0200+408 may be due to an earlier cycle of nuclear activity. We find that inverse-Compton losses with the cosmic microwave background radiation dominate over synchrotron radiative losses in the lobes of all the sources, consistent with earlier studies. We also show that prominence of the bridge emission decreases with increasing redshift, possibly due to inverse-Compton losses. This could affect the appearance and identification of GRSs at large redshifts.
  • We present the results of an unbiased radio search for gravitational lensing events with image separations between 15 and 60 arcsec, which would be associated with clusters of galaxies with masses >10^{13-14}M_{\sun}. A parent population of 1023 extended radio sources stronger than 35 mJy with stellar optical identifications was selected using the FIRST radio catalogue at 1.4 GHz and the APM optical catalogue. The FIRST catalogue was then searched for companions to the parent sources stronger than 7 mJy and with separation in the range 15 to 60 arcsec. Higher resolution observations of the resulting 38 lens candidates were made with the VLA at 1.4 GHz and 5 GHz, and with MERLIN at 5 GHz in order to test the lens hypothesis in each case. None of our targets was found to be a gravitational lens system. These results provide the best current constraint on the lensing rate for this angular scale, but improved calculations of lensing rates from realistic simulations of the clustering of matter on the relevant scales are required before cosmologically significant constraints can be derived from this null result. We now have an efficient, tested observational strategy with which it will be possible to make an order-of-magnitude larger unbiased search in the near future.
  • We consider a composite spin-half particle moving in spatially-varying scalar and vector fields. The vector field is assumed to couple to a conserved charge, but no assumption is made about either the structure of the composite or its coupling to the scalar field. A general form for the piece of the spin-orbit interaction of the composite with the scalar and vector fields which is first-order in momentum transfer ${\bf Q}$ and second-order in the fields is derived.
  • We propose that a significant fraction of the ultracompact HII regions found in massive star-forming clouds are the result of the interaction of the wind and ionizing radiation from a young massive star with the clumpy molecular cloud gas in its neighbourhood. Distributed mass loading in the flow allows the compact nebulae to be long-lived. In this paper, we discuss a particularly simple case, in which the flow in the HII region is everywhere supersonic. The line profiles predicted for this model are highly characteristic, for the case of uniform mass loading. We discuss briefly other observational diagnostics of these models.