• Period-luminosity (PL) sequences of long period variables (LPVs) are commonly interpreted as different pulsation modes, but there is disagreement on the modal assignment. Here, we re-examine the observed PL sequences in the Large Magellanic Cloud, including the sequence of long secondary periods (LSPs), and their associated pulsation modes. Firstly, we theoretically model the sequences using linear, radial, non-adiabatic pulsation models and a population synthesis model of the LMC red giants. Then, we use a semi-empirical approach to assign modes to the pulsation sequences by exploiting observed multi-mode pulsators. As a result of the combined approaches, we consistently find that sequences B and C$^{\prime}$ both correspond to first overtone pulsation, although there are some fundamental mode pulsators at low luminosities on both sequences. The masses of these fundamental mode pulsators are larger at a given luminosity than the mass of the first overtone pulsators. These two sequences B and C$^{\prime}$ are separated by a small period interval in which large amplitude pulsation in a long secondary period (sequence D variability) occurs, meaning that the first overtone pulsation is not seen as the primary mode of pulsation. Observationally, this leads to the splitting of the first overtone pulsation sequence into the two observed sequences B and C$^{\prime}$. Our two independent examinations also show that sequences A$^{\prime}$, A and C correspond to third overtone, second overtone and fundamental mode pulsation, respectively.
  • Context: The Mira variable LX Cyg showed a dramatic increase of its pulsation period in the recent decades and appears to undergo an important transition in its evolution. Aims: We aim at investigating the spectral type evolution of this star over the recent decades as well as during one pulsation cycle in more detail and discuss it in connection with the period evolution. Methods: We present optical, near- and mid-IR low-resolution as well as optical high-resolution spectra to determine the current spectral type. The optical spectrum of LX Cyg has been followed for more than one pulsation cycle. Recent spectra are compared to archival spectra to trace the spectral type evolution and a Spitzer mid-IR spectrum is analysed for the presence of molecular and dust features. Furthermore, the current period is derived from AAVSO data. Results: It is found that the spectral type of LX Cyg changed from S to C sometime between 1975 and 2008. Currently, the spectral type C is stable during a pulsation cycle. It is shown that spectral features typical of C-type stars are present in its spectrum from ~0.5 to 14 $\mu{\rm{m}}$. An emission feature at 10.7 $\mu{\rm{m}}$ is attributed to SiC grains. The period of LX Cyg has increased from ~460 d to ~580 d within only 20 years, and is stable now. Conclusions: We conclude that the change in spectral type and the increase in pulsation period happened simultaneously and are causally connected. Both a recent thermal pulse (TP) and a simple surface temperature decrease appear unlikely to explain the observations. We therefore suggest that the underlying mechanism is related to a recent third dredge-up mixing event that brought up carbon from the interior of the star, i.e. that a genuine abundance change happened. We propose that LX Cyg is a rare transition type object that is uniquely suited to study the transformation from O- to C-rich stars in detail.
  • An analysis of high-resolution near-infrared spectra of a sample of 45 asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars towards the Galactic bulge is presented. The sample consists of two subsamples, a larger one in the inner and intermediate bulge, and a smaller one in the outer bulge. The data are analysed with the help of hydrostatic model atmospheres and spectral synthesis. We derive the radial velocity of all stars, and the atmospheric chemical mix ([Fe/H], C/O, $^{12}$C/$^{13}$C, Al, Si, Ti, and Y) where possible. Our ability to model the spectra is mainly limited by the (in)completeness of atomic and molecular line lists, at least for temperatures down to $T_{\rm eff}\approx3100$ K. We find that the subsample in the inner and intermediate bulge is quite homogeneous, with a slightly sub-solar mean metallicity and only few stars with super-solar metallicity, in agreement with previous studies of non-variable M-type giants in the bulge. All sample stars are oxygen-rich, C/O$<$1.0. The C/O and carbon isotopic ratios suggest that third dredge-up (3DUP) is absent among the sample stars, except for two stars in the outer bulge that are known to contain technetium. These stars are also more metal-poor than the stars in the intermediate or inner bulge. Current stellar masses are determined from linear pulsation models. The masses, metallicities and 3DUP behaviour are compared to AGB evolutionary models. We conclude that these models are partly in conflict with our observations. Furthermore, we conclude that the stars in the inner and intermediate bulge belong to a more metal-rich population that follows bar-like kinematics, whereas the stars in the outer bulge belong to the metal-poor, spheroidal bulge population.
  • One of the main aims of the ESA Rosetta mission is to study the origin of the solar system by exploring comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko at close range. In this paper we discuss the origin and evolution of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko in relation to that of comets in general and in the framework of current solar system formation models. We use data from the OSIRIS scientific cameras as basic constraints. In particular, we discuss the overall bi-lobate shape and the presence of key geological features, such as layers and fractures. We also treat the problem of collisional evolution of comet nuclei by a particle-in-a-box calculation for an estimate of the probability of survival for 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko during the early epochs of the solar system. We argue that the two lobes of the 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko nucleus are derived from two distinct objects that have formed a contact binary via a gentle merger. The lobes are separate bodies, though sufficiently similar to have formed in the same environment. An estimate of the collisional rate in the primordial, trans-planetary disk shows that most comets of similar size to 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko are likely collisional fragments, although survival of primordial planetesimals cannot be excluded. A collisional origin of the contact binary is suggested, and the low bulk density of the aggregate and abundance of volatile species show that a very gentle merger must have occurred. We thus consider two main scenarios: the primordial accretion of planetesimals, and the re-accretion of fragments after an energetic impact onto a larger parent body. We point to the primordial signatures exhibited by 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko and other comet nuclei as critical tests of the collisional evolution.
  • In the last ten years three main facts about the thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) have become evident: 1) the modelling of the TP-AGB phase is critical for the derivation of basic galaxy properties (e.g. mass and age) up to high redshift, with consequent cosmological implications; 2) current TP-AGB calibrations based on Magellanic Cloud (MC) clusters come out not to work properly for other external galaxies, yielding a likely TP-AGB overestimation; 3) the significance of the TP-AGB contribution in galaxies, hence their derived properties, are strongly debated, with conflicting claims in favour of either a heavy or a light TP-AGB. The only way out of this condition of persisting uncertainty is to perform a reliable calibration of the TP-AGB phase as a function of the star's initial mass (hence age) over a wide range of metallicity, from very low to super-solar values. In this context, I will review recent advancements and ongoing efforts towards a physically-sound TP-AGB calibration that, moving beyond the classical use of the MC clusters, combines increasingly refined TP-AGB stellar models with exceptionally high-quality data for resolved TP-AGB stars in nearby galaxies. Preliminary results indicate that a sort of "TP-AGB island" emerges in the age-metallicity plane, where the contribution of these stars is especially developed, embracing preferentially solar- and MC-like metallicities, and intermediate ages (~ few Gyr).
  • We investigate the influence of Asymptotic Giant Branch stars on integrated colours of star clusters of ages between ~100 Myr and a few gigayears, and composition typical for the Magellanic Clouds. We use state-of-the-art stellar evolution models that cover the full thermal pulse phase, and take into account the influence of dusty envelopes on the emerging spectra. We present an alternative approach to the usual isochrone method, and compute integrated fluxes and colours using a Monte Carlo technique that enables us to take into account statistical fluctuations due to the typical small number of cluster stars. We demonstrate how the statistical variations in the number of Asymptotic Giant Branch stars and the temperature and luminosity variations during thermal pulses fundamentally limit the accuracy of the comparison (and calibration, for population synthesis models that require a calibration of the Asymptotic Giant Branch contribution to the total luminosity) with star cluster integrated photometries. When compared to observed integrated colours of individual and stacked clusters in the Magellanic Clouds, our predictions match well most of the observations, when statistical fluctuations are taken into account, although there are discrepancies in narrow age ranges with some (but not all) set of observations.
  • The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) is a planned observatory for very-high energy gamma-ray astronomy. It will consist of several tens of telescopes of different sizes, with a total mirror area of up to 10,000 square meters. Most mirrors of current installations are either polished glass mirrors or diamond-turned aluminium mirrors, both labour intensive technologies. For CTA, several new technologies for a fast and cost-efficient production of light-weight and reliable mirror substrates have been developed and industrial pre-production has started for most of them. In addition, new or improved aluminium-based and dielectric surface coatings have been developed to increase the reflectance over the lifetime of the mirrors compared to those of current Cherenkov telescope instruments.
  • [ABRIDGED] In this study, we set out to a) demonstrate the sensitivity to <4 R_E transiting planets with periods of a few days around our program stars, and b) improve our knowledge of some astrophysical properties(e.g., activity, rotation) of our targets by combining spectroscopic information and our differential photometric measurements. We achieve a typical nightly RMS photometric precision of ~5 mmag, with little or no dependence on the instrumentation used or on the details of the adopted methods for differential photometry. The presence of correlated (red) noise in our data degrades the precision by a factor ~1.3 with respect to a pure white noise regime. Based on a detailed stellar variability analysis, a) we detected no transit-like events; b) we determined photometric rotation periods of ~0.47 days and ~0.22 days for LHS 3445 and GJ 1167A, respectively; c) these values agree with the large projected rotational velocities (~25 km/s and ~33 km/s, respectively) inferred for both stars based on the analysis of archival spectra; d) the estimated inclinations of the stellar rotation axes for LHS 3445 and GJ 1167A are consistent with those derived using a simple spot model; e) short-term, low-amplitude flaring events were recorded for LHS 3445 and LHS 2686. Finally, based on simulations of transit signals of given period and amplitude injected in the actual (nightly reduced) photometric data for our sample, we derive a relationship between transit detection probability and phase coverage. We find that, using the BLS search algorithm, even when phase coverage approaches 100%, there is a limit to the detection probability of ~90%. Around program stars with phase coverage >50% we would have had >80% chances of detecting planets with P<1 day inducing fractional transit depths >0.5%, corresponding to minimum detectable radii in the range 1.0-2.2 R_E. [ABRIDGED]
  • The new data release of OPERA - CNGS experiment, obtained with a shorter spill of protons, confirms the tachyionic behavior expected from the phenomenological model of a Majorana neutrino with a fictitious imaginary mass term acquired during the propagation in the Earth's crust, recently presented by us. We performed numerical simulations of neutrino event detections to compare the properties of these Majorana tachyons with the new OPERA results, finding a good agreement. The possibility of spin-to orbital angular momentum conversion that is expected to give a negative squared mass in a medium, is also briefly discussed.
  • The new data release of OPERA - CNGS experiment, obtained with a shorter spill of protons, confirms the tachyionic behavior expected from the phenomenological model of a Majorana neutrino with a fictitious imaginary mass term acquired during the propagation in the Earth's crust, recently presented by us. We performed numerical simulations of neutrino event detections to compare the properties of these Majorana tachyons with the new OPERA results, finding a good agreement. The possibility of spin-to orbital angular momentum conversion that is expected to give a negative squared mass in a medium, is also briefly discussed.
  • From the data release of OPERA - CNGS experiment, and publicly announced on 23 September 2011, we cast a phenomenological model based on a Majorana neutrino state carrying a fictitious imaginary mass term, already discussed by Majorana in 1932. This mass term can be induced by the interaction with the matter of the Earth's crust during the 735 Km travel. Within the experimental errors, we prove that the model fits with OPERA, MINOS and supernova SN1987a data. Possible violations to Lorentz invariance due to quantum gravity effects have been considered.
  • From the data release of OPERA - CNGS experiment, and publicly announced on 23 September 2011, we cast a phenomenological model based on a Majorana neutrino state carrying a fictitious imaginary mass term, already discussed by Majorana in 1932. This mass term can be induced by the interaction with the matter of the Earth's crust during the 735 Km travel. Within the experimental errors, we prove that the model fits with OPERA, MINOS and supernova SN1987a data. Possible violations to Lorentz invariance due to quantum gravity effects have been considered.
  • We analyze the effect of Proca mass and orbital angular momentum of photons imposed by a structured plasma in Kerr-Newman and Reissner-Nordstrom-de Sitter spacetimes. The presence of characteristic lengths in a turbulent plasma converts the virtual Proca photon mass on orbital angular momentum, with the result of decreasing the virtual photon mass. The combination of this plasma effect and that of the gravitational field leads to a new astrophysical phenomenon that imprints a specific distribution of orbital angular momentum into different frequencies of the light emitted from the neighborhood of such a black hole. The determination of the orbital angular momentum spectrum of the radiation in different frequency bands leads to a complete characterization of the electrostatic and gravitational field of the black hole and of the plasma turbulence, with fundamental astrophysical and cosmological implications.
  • Context: Strings and other alternative theories describing the quantum properties of space-time suggest that space-time could present a foamy structure and also that, in certain cases, quantum gravity (QG) may manifest at energies much below the Planck scale. One of the observable effects could be the degradation of the diffraction images of distant sources. Aims: We searched for this degradation effect, caused by QG fluctuations, in the light of the farthest quasars (QSOs) observed by the Hubble Space Telescope with the aim of setting new limits on the fluctuations of the space-time foam and QG models. Methods: We developed a software that estimates and compares the phase variation in the interference patterns of the high-redshift QSOs, taken from the snapshot survey of HST-SDSS, with those of stars that are expected to not be affected by QG effects. We used a two-parameter function to determine, for each test star and QSO, the maximum of the diffraction pattern and to calculate the Strehl ratio. Results: Our results go far beyond those already present in the literature. By adopting the most conservative approach where the correction terms, that describe the possibility for space-time fluctuations cumulating across long distances and partially compensate for the effects of the phase variations, are taken into account. We exclude the random walk model and most of the holographic models of the space-time foam. Without considering these correction terms, all the main QG scenarios are excluded. Finally, our results show the absence of any directional dependence of QG effects and the validity of the cosmological principle with an independent method; that is, viewed on a large scale, the properties of the Universe are the same for all observers, including the effects of space-time fluctuations.
  • The paper has been deeply reviewed and compeltely re-written.
  • We introduce a new tool - AESOPUS: Accurate Equation of State and OPacity Utility Software - for computing the equation of state and the Rosseland mean (RM) opacities of matter in the ideal gas phase. Results are given as a function of one pair of state variables, (i.e. temperature T in the range 3.2 <= log(T) <= 4.5, and parameter R= rho/(T/10^6 K)^3 in the range -8 <= log(R) <= 1), and arbitrary chemical mixture. The chemistry is presently solved for about 800 species, consisting of almost 300 atomic and 500 molecular species. The gas opacities account for many continuum and discrete sources, including atomic opacities, molecular absorption bands, and collision-induced absorption. Several tests made on AESOPUS have proved that the new opacity tool is accurate in the results,flexible in the management of the input prescriptions, and agile in terms of computational time requirement. We set up a web-interface (http://stev.oapd.inaf.it/aesopus) which enables the user to compute and shortly retrieve RM opacity tables according to his/her specific needs, allowing a full degree of freedom in specifying the chemical composition of the gas. Useful applications may regard RM opacities of gas mixtures with i) scaled-solar abundances of metals, choosing among various solar mixture compilations available in the literature; ii) varying CNO abundances, suitable for evolutionary models of red and asymptotic giant branch stars and massive stars in the Wolf-Rayet stages; iii) various degrees of enhancement in alpha-elements, and C-N, Na-O and Mg-Al abundance anti-correlations, necessary to properly describe the properties of stars in early-type galaxies and Galactic globular clusters; iv) zero-metal abundances appropriate for studies of gas opacity in primordial conditions.
  • We propose the use of heralded photons to detect Gravitational Waves (GWs). Heralded photons are those photons that, produced during a parametric downconversion process, are "labelled" by the detection and counting of coincidences of their correlated or entangled twins and therefore can be discriminated from the background noise, independently of the type of correlation/entanglement used in the setup. Without losing any generality, we illustrate our proposal with a gedankenexperiment, in which the presence of a gravitational wave causes a relative rotation of the reference frames associated to the double-slit and the test polarizer, respectively, of a Walborn's quantum eraser \cite{wal02}. In this thought experiment, the GW is revealed by the detection of heralded photons in the dark fringes of the recovered interference pattern by the quantum eraser. Other types of entanglement, such as momentum-space or energy-time, could be used to obtain heralded photons to be used in the future with high-frequency GW interferometric detectors when enough bright sources of correlated photons will be available.
  • It has been found that there is a strong correlation between the circular velocity V_c and the central stellar velocity dispersion \sigma_0 of galaxies. In this respect, low surface brightness galaxies (LSB) follow a different relation when compared to Elliptical and high surface brightness (HSB) galaxies. The intrinsic scatter of the V_c-\sigma_0 is partially due to the different concentration of the light distribution. In this work we measure the C_28 concentration parameter for a sample of 17 LSB finding that the C_28 parameter does not account for the different behavior in the $V_c - {\sigma}_0$ for this class of objects.
  • MASYS is the AKARI spectroscopic survey of Symbiotic Stars in the Magellanic Clouds, and one of the European Open Time Observing Programmes approved for the AKARI (Post-Helium) Phase-3. It is providing the first ever near-IR spectra of extragalactic symbiotic stars. The observations are scheduled to be completed in July 2009.
  • We describe the construction and the properties of the SWIRE-SDSS database, a preliminary derivation of the Far-Infrared Local Luminosity Functions at 24/70/160 micron based on such a database and ways in which VO tools will allow to refine and extend such work.
  • The main goal of this work is the analysis of new approaches to the study of the properties of astronomical sites. In particular, satellite data measuring aerosols have recently been proposed as a useful technique for site characterization and searching for new sites to host future very large telescopes. Nevertheless, these data need to be critically considered and interpreted in accordance with the spatial resolution and spectroscopic channels used. In this paper we have explored and retrieved measurements from satellites with high spatial and temporal resolutions and concentrated on channels of astronomical interest. The selected datasets are OMI on board the NASA Aura satellite and MODIS on board the NASA Terra and Aqua satellites. A comparison of remote sensing and in situ techniques is discussed. As a result, we find that aerosol data provided by satellites up to now are not reliable enough for aerosol site characterization, and in situ data are required.
  • Context. In 1985, at the end of the active phase 1977-1986, a broad (4000 km/s) Ly alpha line appeared in the symbiotic system CH Cygni that had never been observed previously. Aims. In this work we investigate the origin of this anomalous broad Ly alpha line. Methods. We suggest a new interpretation of the broad Ly alpha based on the theory of charge transfer reactions between ambient hydrogen atoms and post-shock protons at a strong shock front. Results. We have found that the broad Ly alpha line originated from the blast wave created by the outburst, while the contemporary optical and UV lines arose from the nebula downstream of the expanding shock in the colliding wind scenario.
  • Context. We analyse the line and continuum spectra of the symbiotic system CH Cygni. Aims. To show that the colliding-wind model is valid to explain this symbiotic star at different phases. Methods. Peculiar observed features such as flickering, radio variation, X-ray emission, as well as the distribution of the nebulae and shells throughout the system are investigated by modelling the spectra at different epochs. The models account consistently for shock and photoionization and are constrained by absolute fluxes. Results. We find that the reverse shock between the stars leads to the broad lines observed during the active phases, as well as to radio and hard X-ray emission, while the expanding shock is invoked to explain the data during the transition phases.
  • The anomalous X-ray pulsars and soft gamma-repeaters are peculiar high-energy sources believed to host a magnetar, i.e. an ultra-magnetized neutron star. Their persistent, soft X-ray emission (~1-10 keV)is usually modeled by the superposition of a blackbody and a power-law tail. It has been suggested that this spectrum forms as the thermal photons emitted by the star surface traverse the magnetosphere. Magnetar magnetospheres are likely different from those of ordinary radio-pulsars, since the external magnetic field may acquire a toroidal component as a consequence of the deformation of the star crust induced by the super-strong interior field. In turn, the magnetosphere will be permeated by currents that can boost primary photons through repeated scatterings. Here we present 3D Monte Carlo simulations of photon propagation in a twisted magnetosphere. Our model is based on a simplified treatment of the charge carriers velocity distribution which, however, accounts for the particle collective motion, in addition to the thermal one. Present treatment is restricted to conservative (Thomson) scattering in the electron rest frame. The code, nonetheless, is completely general and inclusion of the relativistic QED resonant cross section, which is required in the modeling of the hard (~20-200 keV) spectral tails observed in the magnetar candidates, is under way. The properties of emerging spectra have been assessed under different conditions, by exploring the model parameter space, including effects arising from the viewing geometry. Monte Carlo runs have been collected into a spectral archive. Two tabulated XSPEC spectral models, with and without viewing angles, have been produced and applied to the 0.1-10 keV XMM-Newton EPIC-pn spectrum of the AXP CXOU J1647-4552.
  • We present new synthetic models of the TP-AGB evolution. They are computed for 7 values of initial metal content (Z from 0.0001 to 0.03) and for initial masses between 0.5 and 5.0 Msun, thus extending the low- and intermediate-mass tracks of Girardi et al. (2000) until the beginning of the post-AGB phase. The calculations are performed by means of a synthetic code that incorporates many recent improvements, among which we mention: (1) the use of detailed and revised analytical relations to describe the evolution of quiescent luminosity, inter-pulse period, third dredge-up, hot bottom burning, pulse cycle luminosity variations, etc.; (2) the use of variable molecular opacities -- i.e. opacities consistent with the changing photospheric chemical composition -- in the integration of a complete envelope model, instead of the standard choice of scaled-solar opacities; (3) the use of formalisms for the mass-loss rates derived from pulsating dust-driven wind models of C- and O-rich AGB stars; and (4) the switching of pulsation modes between the first overtone and the fundamental one along the evolution, which has consequences in terms of the history of mass loss. It follows that, in addition to the time evolution on the HR diagram, the new models predict in a consistent fashion also variations in surface chemical compositions, pulsation modes and periods, and mass-loss rates. The onset and efficiency of the third dredge-up process are calibrated in order to reproduce basic observables like the carbon star luminosity functions in the Magellanic Clouds, and TP-AGB lifetimes (star counts) in Magellanic Cloud clusters. Forthcoming papers will present the theoretical isochrones and chemical yields derived from these tracks, and additional tests performed with the aid of a complete population synthesis code.