• G. Agakishiev, J. C. Berger-Chen, P. Cabanelas, L. Fabbietti, J. Friese, R. Gernhäuser, D. González-Díaz, R. Holzmann, M. Jurkovic, W. Koenig, F. Krizek, A. Kugler, K. Lapidus, L. Maier, B. Michalska, L. Naumann, V. Pechenov, A. Reshetin, A. Schmah, S. Spataro, A. Tarantola, H. Tsertos, C. Wendisch, A. V. Sarantsev Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, 95125 Catania, Italy, LIP-Laboratório de Instrumentação e Física Experimental de Partículas, 3004-516 Coimbra, Portugal, Smoluchowski Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University of Cracow, 30-059 Kraków, Poland, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, 64291 Darmstadt, Germany, Institut für Strahlenphysik, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, 01314 Dresden, Germany, Joint Institute of Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna, Russia, Institut für Kernphysik, Goethe-Universität, 60438 Frankfurt, Germany, Excellence Cluster 'Origin, Structure of the Universe', 85748 Garching, Germany, Physik Department E12, Technische Universität München, 85748 Garching, Germany, II.Physikalisches Institut, Justus Liebig Universität Giessen, 35392 Giessen, Germany, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Milano, 20133 Milano, Italy, Institute for Nuclear Research, Russian Academy of Science, 117312 Moscow, Russia, Institute of Theoretical, Experimental Physics, 117218 Moscow, Russia, Institut de Physique Nucléaire, CNRS-IN2P3, Univ. Paris-Sud, Université Paris-Saclay, 91406 Orsay Cedex, France, Nuclear Physics Institute, Academy of Sciences of Czech Republic, 25068 Rez, Czech Republic, LabCAF. F. Física, Univ. de Santiago de Compostela, 15706 Santiago de Compostela, Spain, NRC "Kurchatov Institute", PNPI, 188300, Gatchina, Russia, ISEC Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal, ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI, 64291 Darmstadt, Germany, Technische Universität Dresden, 01062 Dresden, Germany, Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Milano, 20133 Milano, Italy, Dipartimento di Fisica, INFN, Università di Torino, 10125 Torino, Italy, Utrecht University, 3584 CC Utrecht, The Netherlands, Helmholtz--Institut für Strahlen-- und Kernphysik, Universität Bonn, Germany)
    March 24, 2017 nucl-ex
    Baryon resonance production in proton-proton collisions at a kinetic beam energy of 1.25 GeV is investigated. The multi-differential data were measured by the HADES collaboration. Exclusive channels with one pion in the final state ($np\pi^{+}$ and $pp\pi^{0}$) were put to extended studies based on various observables in the framework of a one-pion exchange model and with solutions obtained within the framework of a partial wave analysis (PWA) of the Bonn-Gatchina group. The results of the PWA confirm the dominant contribution of the $\Delta$(1232), yet with a sizable impact of the $N$(1440) and non-resonant partial waves.
  • Near the band edge of photonic crystal waveguides, localized modes appear due to disorder. We demonstrate a new method to elucidate spatial profile of the localized modes in such systems using precise local tuning. Using deconvolution with the known thermal profile, the spatial profile of a localized mode with quality factor ($Q$) $>10^5$ is successfully reconstructed with a resolution of $2.5 \ \mu $m.
  • We study various representations for cyclic lambda-terms as higher-order or as first-order term graphs. We focus on the relation between 'lambda-higher-order term graphs' (lambda-ho-term-graphs), which are first-order term graphs endowed with a well-behaved scope function, and their representations as 'lambda-term-graphs', which are plain first-order term graphs with scope-delimiter vertices that meet certain scoping requirements. Specifically we tackle the question: Which class of first-order term graphs admits a faithful embedding of lambda-ho-term-graphs in the sense that (i) the homomorphism-based sharing-order on lambda-ho-term-graphs is preserved and reflected, and (ii) the image of the embedding corresponds closely to a natural class (of lambda-term-graphs) that is closed under homomorphism? We systematically examine whether a number of classes of lambda-term-graphs have this property, and we find a particular class of lambda-term-graphs that satisfies this criterion. Term graphs of this class are built from application, abstraction, variable, and scope-delimiter vertices, and have the characteristic feature that the latter two kinds of vertices have back-links to the corresponding abstraction. This result puts a handle on the concept of subterm sharing for higher-order term graphs, both theoretically and algorithmically: We obtain an easily implementable method for obtaining the maximally shared form of lambda-ho-term-graphs. Furthermore, we open up the possibility to pull back properties from first-order term graphs to lambda-ho-term-graphs, properties such as the complete lattice structure of bisimulation equivalence classes with respect to the sharing order.
  • We study various representations for cyclic lambda-terms as higher-order or as first-order term graphs. We focus on the relation between 'lambda-higher-order term graphs' (lambda-ho-term-graphs), which are first-order term graphs endowed with a well-behaved scope function, and their representations as 'lambda-term-graphs', which are plain first-order term graphs with scope-delimiter vertices that meet certain scoping requirements. Specifically we tackle the question: Which class of first-order term graphs admits a faithful embedding of lambda-ho-term-graphs in the sense that (i) the homomorphism-based sharing-order on lambda-ho-term-graphs is preserved and reflected, and (ii) the image of the embedding corresponds closely to a natural class (of lambda-term-graphs) that is closed under homomorphism? We systematically examine whether a number of classes of lambda-term-graphs have this property, and we find a particular class of lambda-term-graphs that satisfies this criterion. Term graphs of this class are built from application, abstraction, variable, and scope-delimiter vertices, and have the characteristic feature that the latter two kinds of vertices have back-links to the corresponding abstraction. This result puts a handle on the concept of subterm sharing for higher-order term graphs, both theoretically and algorithmically: We obtain an easily implementable method for obtaining the maximally shared form of lambda-ho-term-graphs. Furthermore, we open up the possibility to pull back properties from first-order term graphs to lambda-ho-term-graphs, properties such as the complete lattice structure of bisimulation equivalence classes with respect to the sharing order.
  • The generally adopted value for the solar abundance of indium is over six times higher than the meteoritic value. We address this discrepancy through numerical synthesis of the 451.13 nm line on which all indium abundance studies are based, both for the quiet-sun and the sunspot umbra spectrum, employing standard atmosphere models and accounting for hyperfine structure and Zeeman splitting in detail. The results, as well as a re-appraisal of indium nucleosynthesis, suggest that the solar indium abundance is close to the meteoritic value, and that some unidentified ion line causes the 451.13 nm feature in the quiet-sun spectrum.
  • Current observational constraints on the dynamical evolution of star clusters are reviewed. Theory and observations now agree nicely on the mass dependency and time scales for disruption of young star clusters in galactic disks, but many problems still await resolution. The origin of the mass function of old globular clusters, and its (near) invariance with respect to host galaxy properties and location within the host galaxy remain prominent puzzles. Most current models fail to reproduce the globular cluster mass function as a result of dynamical evolution from an initial power-law, except under very specific conditions which are not generally consistent with observations. How well do we actually know the proper initial conditions? The cluster initial mass function (CIMF) seems to be consistent with a power-law with exponent alpha~ -2 in most present-day star forming galaxies, but the limits of the mass range over which this approximation is valid remain poorly constrained both observationally and theoretically. Furthermore, there are hints that some dwarf galaxies may have CIMFs which deviate from a power-law.
  • We predict the survival time of initially bound star clusters in the solar neighbourhood taking into account: (1) stellar evolution, (2) tidal stripping, (3) shocking by spiral arms and (4) encounters with giant molecular clouds. We find that the predicted dissolution time is t_dis= 1.7 (M_i/10^4 M_sun)^0.67 Gyr for clusters in the mass range of 10^2 < M_i < 10^5 M_sun, where M_i is the initial mass of the cluster.. The resulting predicted shape of the logarithmic age distribution agrees very well with the empirical one, derived from a complete sample of clusters in the solar neighbourhood within 600 pc. The required scaling factor implies a star formation rate of 400 M_sun/Myr within 600 pc from the Sun or a surface formation rate of 3.5 10^-10 M_sun/(yr pc^2) for stars in bound clusters with an initial mass in the range of 10^2 to 3 10^4 M_sun.
  • The launch of Chandra and XMM-Newton has led to important new findings concerning the X-ray emission from supernova remnants. These findings are a result of the high spatial resolution with which imaging spectroscopy is now possible, but also some useful results have come out of the grating spectrometers of both X-ray observatories, despite the extended nature of supernova remnants. The findings discussed here are the evidence for slow equilibration of electron and ion temperatures near fast supernova remnant shocks, the magnetic field amplification near remnant shocks due to cosmic ray acceleration, a result that has come out of studying narrow filaments of X-ray synchrotron emission, and finally the recent findings concerning Fe-rich ejecta in Type Ia remnants and the presence of a jet/counter jet system in the Type Ib supernova remnant Cas A.
  • This paper discusses several aspects of current research on high energy emission from supernova remnants, covering the following main topics: 1) The recent evidence for magnetic field amplification near supernova remnant shocks, which makes that cosmic rays are more efficiently accelerated than previously thought. 2) The evidence that ions and electrons in some remnants have very different temperatures, and only equilibrate through Coulomb interactions. 3) The evidence that the explosion that created Cas A was asymmetric, and seems to have involved a jet/counter jet structure. And finally, 4), I will argue that the unremarkable properties of supernova remnants associated with magnetars candidates, suggest that magnetars are not formed from rapidly (P ~ 1 ms) rotating proto-neutron stars, but that it is more likely that they are formed from massive progenitors stars with high magnetic fields.
  • SAX J1747.0-2853 is an X-ray transient which exhibited X-ray outbursts yearly between 1998 and 2001, and most probably also in 1976. The outburst of 2000 was the longest and brightest. We have analyzed X-ray data sets that focus on the 2000 outburst and were obtained with BeppoSAX, XMM-Newton and RXTE. The data cover unabsorbed 2--10 keV fluxes between 0.1 and 5.3 X 10^-9 erg/s/cm^2. The equivalent luminosity range is 6 X 10^35 to 2 X 10^37 erg/s. The 0.3--10 keV spectrum is well described by a combination of a multi-temperature disk blackbody, a hot Comptonization component and a narrow Fe-K emission line at 6.5 to 6.8 keV with an equivalent width of up to 285 eV. The hydrogen column density in the line of sight is (8.8+/-0.5) X 10^22 cm^-2. The most conspicuous spectral changes in this model are represented by variations of the temperature and radius of the inner edge of the accretion disk, and a jump of the equivalent width of the Fe-K line in one observation. Furthermore, 45 type-I X-ray bursts were unambiguously detected between 1998 and 2001 which all occurred during or close to outbursts. We derive a distance of 7.5+/-1.3 kpc which is consistent with previous determinations. Our failure to detect bursts for prolonged periods outside outbursts provides indirect evidence that the source returns to quiescence between outbursts and is a true transient.
  • We use the ages, masses and metallicities of the rich young star cluster systems in the nearby starburst galaxies NGC 3310 and NGC 6745 to derive their cluster formation histories and subsequent evolution. We further expand our analysis of the systematic uncertainties involved in the use of broad-band observations to derive these parameters by examining the effects of a priori assumptions on the individual cluster metallicities. The age (and metallicity) distributions of both the clusters in the circumnuclear ring in NGC 3310 and of those outside the ring are statistically indistinguishable, but there is a clear and significant excess of higher-mass clusters IN the ring compared to the non-ring cluster sample; it is likely that the physical conditions in the starburst ring may be conducive for the formation of higher-mass star clusters, on average, than in the relatively more quiescent environment of the main galactic disc. For the NGC 6745 cluster system we derive a median age of ~10 Myr. NGC 6745 contains a significant population of high-mass "super star clusters", with masses in the range 6.5 <= log(M_cl/M_sun) <= 8.0. This detection supports the scenario that such objects form preferentially in the extreme environments of interacting galaxies. The age of the cluster populations in both NGC 3310 and NGC 6745 is significantly lower than their respective characteristic cluster disruption time-scales. This allows us to obtain an independent estimate of the INITIAL cluster mass function slope, alpha = 2.04(+- 0.23)(+0.13)(-0.43) for NGC 3310, and 1.96(+- 0.15)(+- 0.19) for NGC 6745, respectively, for masses M_cl >= 10^5 M_sun and M_cl >= 4 x 10^5 M_sun. These mass function slopes are consistent with those of other young star cluster systems in interacting and starburst galaxies.
  • We report the hard X-ray properties of the young Crab-like LMC pulsar PSR B0540-69, using archival RXTE PCA (2 - 60 keV) and RXTE HEXTE (15 - 250 keV) data. Making use of the very long effective exposure of 684 ks, we derived a very detailed master pulse profile for energies 2 - 20 keV. We confirm the broad single-pulse shape with a dip in the middle and with a significant fine structure to the left of the dip. For the first time pulse profiles in the 10 - 50 keV energy interval are shown. Remarkably, the coarse pulse shape is stable from the optical up to X-ray energies analogous to the case of the Crab pulsar (PSR B0531+21). The profiles can be described with two Gaussians with a phase separation of ~0.2; the distribution of the ratios between the two components from the optical to the X-ray range is consistent with being flat. Therefore we cannot conclude that the profile consists of two distinct components. We also derived a new total pulsed spectrum in the ~0.01 - 50 keV range in a consistent analysis including also archival ROSAT PSPC (0.01 - 2.5 keV) data. This spectrum cannot be described by a single power-law, but requires an additional energy dependent term. The bending of the spectrum around 10 keV resembles that of the Crab pulsar spectrum. Although model calculations using Outer Gap scenarios could probably explain the high-energy characteristics of PSR B0540-69 as they successfully do for the Crab, our measurements do not entirely agree with the latest calculations by Zhang & Cheng (2000). The small discrepancies are likely to be caused by uncertainties in the pulsar's geometry.
  • The currently most popular models for the dynamical evolution of star clusters predict that the power-law Cluster Luminosity Functions (CLFs) of young star cluster systems will be transformed rapidly into the universal Gaussian CLFs of old Milky Way-type "globular" cluster systems. Here, we provide the first evidence for a turn-over in the intermediate-age, approximately 1 Gyr-old CLF in the center of the nearby starburst galaxy M82, which very closely matches the universal CLFs of old Milky Way-type globular cluster systems. This provides an important test of both cluster disruption theories and hierarchical galaxy formation models. It also lends strong support to the scenario that these young cluster systems may eventually evolve into old Milky Way-type globular cluster systems. M82's proximity, its shortest known cluster disruption time-scale of any galaxy, and its well-defined peak of cluster formation make it an ideal candidate to probe the evolution of its star cluster system to fainter luminosities, and thus lower masses, than has been possible for any galaxy before.
  • ABRIDGED: We obtain new age and mass estimates for the star clusters in M82's fossil starburst region B, based on improved fitting methods. Our new age estimates confirm the peak in the age histogram attributed to the last tidal encounter with M81; we find a peak formation epoch at slightly older ages than previously published, log(t_peak / yr) = 9.04, with a Gaussian sigma of Delta log(t_width) = 0.273. Cluster disruption has removed a large fraction of the older clusters. Adopting the expression for the cluster disruption time-scale of t_dis(M)= t_dis^4 (M/10^4 Msun)^gamma with gamma = 0.62 (Paper I), we find that the ratios between the real cluster formation rates in the pre-burst phase (log(t/yr) <= 9.4), the burst-phase (8.4 < log(t/yr) < 9.4) and the post-burst phase (log(t/yr) <= 8.4) are about 1:2:1/40. The mass distribution of the clusters formed during the burst shows a turnover at log(M_cl/Msun) ~ 5.3 which is not caused by selection effects. This distribution can be explained by cluster formation with an initial power-law mass function of slope alpha=2 up to a maximum cluster mass of M_max = 3 x 10^6 Msun, and cluster disruption with a normalisation time-scale t_dis^4 / t_burst = (3.0 +/- 0.3) x 10^{-2}. For a burst age of 1 x 10^9 yr, we find that the disruption time-scale of a cluster of 10^4 Msun is t_dis^4 ~ 3 x 10^7 years, with an uncertainty of approximately a factor of two. This is the shortest disruption time-scale known in any galaxy.
  • We study the process of observation (measurement), within the framework of a `perspectival' (`relational', `relative state') version of the modal interpretation of quantum mechanics. We show that if we assume certain features of discreteness and determinism in the operation of the measuring device (which could be a part of the observer's nerve system), this gives rise to classical characteristics of the observed properties, in the first place to spatial localization. We investigate to what extent semi-classical behavior of the object system itself (as opposed to the observational system) is needed for the emergence of classicality. Decoherence is an essential element in the mechanism of observation that we assume, but it turns out that in our approach no environment-induced decoherence on the level of the object system is required for the emergence of classical properties.
  • We present a new model for the Galactic population of close double white dwarfs. The model accounts for the suggestion of the avoidance of a substantial spiral-in during mass transfer between a giant and a main-sequence star of comparable mass and for detailed cooling models. It agrees well with the observations of the local sample of white dwarfs if the initial binary fraction is close to 50% and an ad hoc assumption is made that white dwarfs with mass less than about 0.3 solar mass cool faster than the models suggest. About 1000 white dwarfs brighter than V=15 have to be surveyed for detection of a pair which has total mass greater than the Chandrasekhar mass and will merge within 10 Gyr.