• We describe the design and performance of the Medium Resolution Spectrometer (MRS) for the JWST-MIRI instrument. The MRS incorporates four coaxial spectral channels in a compact opto-mechanical layout that generates spectral images over fields of view up to 7.7 X 7.7 arcseconds in extent and at spectral resolving powers ranging from 1,300 to 3,700. Each channel includes an all-reflective integral field unit (IFU): an 'image slicer' that reformats the input field for presentation to a grating spectrometer. Two 1024 X 1024 focal plane arrays record the output spectral images with an instantaneous spectral coverage of approximately one third of the full wavelength range of each channel. The full 5 to 28.5 micron spectrum is then obtained by making three exposures using gratings and pass-band-determining filters that are selected using just two three-position mechanisms. The expected on-orbit optical performance is presented, based on testing of the MIRI Flight Model and including spectral and spatial coverage and resolution. The point spread function of the reconstructed images is shown to be diffraction limited and the optical transmission is shown to be consistent with the design expectations.
  • SONYC, short for "Substellar Objects in Nearby Young Clusters", is a survey program to provide a census of the substellar population in nearby star forming regions. We have conducted deep optical and near-infrared photometry in five young regions (NGC1333, rho Ophiuchi, Chamaeleon-I, Upper Sco, and Lupus-3), combined with proper motions, and followed by extensive spectroscopic campaigns with Subaru and VLT, in which we have obtained more than 700 spectra of candidate low-mass objects. We have identified and characterized more than 60 new substellar objects, among them a handful of objects with masses close to, or below the Deuterium burning limit. Through SONYC and surveys by other groups, the substellar IMF is now well characterized down to ~ 5 - 10 MJup, and we find that the ratio of the number of stars with respect to brown dwarfs lies between 2 and 6. A comprehensive survey of NGC 1333 reveals that, down to ~5MJup, free-floating objects with planetary masses are 20-50 times less numerous than stars, i.e. their total contribution to the mass budget of the clusters can be neglected.
  • PAHs have been detected toward molecular clouds and some young stars with disks, but have not yet been associated with embedded young stars. We present a sensitive mid-IR spectroscopic survey of PAH features toward a sample of low-mass embedded YSOs. The aim is to put constraints on the PAH abundance in the embedded phase of star formation using radiative transfer modeling. VLT-ISAAC L-band spectra for 39 sources and Spitzer IRS spectra for 53 sources are presented. Line intensities are compared to recent surveys of Herbig Ae/Be and T Tauri stars. The radiative transfer codes RADMC and RADICAL are used to model the PAH emission from embedded YSOs consisting of a PMS star with a circumstellar disk embedded in an envelope. The dependence of the PAH feature on PAH abundance, stellar radiation field, inclination and the extinction by the surrounding envelope is studied. The 3.3 micron PAH feature is undetected for the majority of the sample (97%), with typical upper limits of 5E-16 W/m^2. Compact 11.2 micron PAH emission is seen directly towards 1 out of the 53 Spitzer Short-High spectra, for a source that is borderline embedded. For all 12 sources with both VLT and Spitzer spectra, no PAH features are detected in either. In total, PAH features are detected toward at most 1 out of 63 (candidate) embedded protostars (<~ 2%), even lower than observed for class II T Tauri stars with disks (11-14%). Assuming typical class I stellar and envelope parameters, the absence of PAHs emission is most likely explained by the absence of emitting carriers through a PAH abundance at least an order of magnitude lower than in molecular clouds but similar to that found in disks. Thus, most PAHs likely enter the protoplanetary disks frozen out in icy layers on dust grains and/or in coagulated form.
  • We announce the discovery of SST-Lup3-1, a very low mass star close to the brown dwarf boundary in Lupus III with a circum(sub)stellar disk, discovered by the `Cores to Disks' Spitzer Legacy Program from mid-, near-infrared and optical data, with very conspicuous crystalline silicate features in its spectrum. It is the first of such objects with a full 5 to 35 micron spectrum taken with the IRS and it shows strong 10 and 20 micron silicate features with high feature to continuum ratios and clear crystalline features out to 33 micron. The dust in the disk upper layer has a crystalline silicate grain fraction between 15% and 33%, depending on the assumed dust continuum. The availability of the full Spitzer infrared spectrum allows an analysis of the dust composition as a function of temperature and position in the disk. The hot (~ 300 K) dust responsible for the 10 micron feature consists of a roughly equal mix of small (~ 0.1 micron) and large (~ 1.5 micron) grains, whereas the cold (~ 70 K) dust responsible for the longer wavelength silicate features contains primarily large grains (> 1 micron). Since the cold dust emission arises from deeper layers in the inner (< 3 AU) disk as well as from the surface layers of the outer (3-5 AU) disk, this provides direct evidence for combined grain growth and settling in the disk. The inferred crystalline mass fractions in the two components are comparable. Since only the inner 0.02 AU of the disk is warm enough to anneal the amorphous silicate grains, even the lowest fraction of 15% of crystalline material requires either very efficient mixing or other formation mechanisms.
  • Recent results indicate that the grain size and crystallinity inferred from observations of silicate features may be correlated with spectral type of the central star and/or disk geometry. In this paper, we show that grain size, as probed by the 10 um silicate feature peak-to-continuum and 11.3-to-9.8 um flux ratios, is inversely proportional to log L_star. These trends can be understood using a simple two-layer disk model for passive irradiated flaring disks, CGPLUS. We find that the radius, R_10, of the 10 um silicate emission zone in the disk goes as (L_star/L_sun)^0.56, with slight variations depending on disk geometry (flaring angle, inner disk radius). The observed correlations, combined with simulated emission spectra of olivine and pyroxene mixtures, imply a grain size dependence on luminosity. Combined with the fact that R_10 is smaller for less luminous stars, this implies that the apparent grain size of the emitting dust is larger for low-luminositysources. In contrast, our models suggest that the crystallinity is only marginally affected, because for increasing luminosity, the zone for thermal annealing (assumed to be at T>800 K) is enlarged by roughly the same factor as the silicate emission zone. The observed crystallinity is affected by disk geometry, however, with increased crystallinity in flat disks. The apparent crystallinity may also increase with grain growth due to a corresponding increase in contrast between crystalline and amorphous silicate emission bands.
  • We present preliminary results of spectroscopic data obtained with the La Silla 3.6m TIMMI2 and the VLT-ISAAC instruments. We have obtained 23 TIMMI2 N-band and 18 Q-band spectra for our total sample of 36 stars in March 2003 to investigate the evolution of the grain properties in circumstellar disks. Our sample consists of Herbig stars, T Tauri stars and Vega-like stars, some of which have recently been identified to be members of nearby (<100 pc) stellar associations. Silicate and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) emission features are detected and the spatial resolution of TIMMI2 allowed to place upper limits on the spatial extent of the emission. We also obtained ISAAC L-band spectra of 4 well-studied disks. For the Herbig Be star HD 100546, we detect spatially extended PAH emission at 3.3 micron which corresponds to a source with radius 11 +/- 3 AU in this line.