• We present models of deeply buried ultraluminous infrared galaxy (ULIRG) spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and use them to construct a three-dimensional diagram for diagnosing the nature of observed ULIRGs. Our goal is to construct a suite of SEDs for a very simple model ULIRG structure, and to explore how well this simple model can (by itself) explain the full range of observed ULIRG properties. We use our diagnostic to analyze archival Spitzer Space Telescope IRS spectra of ULIRGs and find that: (1) In general, our model does provide a comprehensive explanation of the distribution of mid-IR ULIRG properties; (2) >75% (in some cases 100%) of the bolometric luminosities of the most deeply buried ULIRGs must be powered by a dust-enshrouded active galactic nucleus; (3) an unobscured "keyhole" view through <~10% of the obscuring medium surrounding a deeply buried ULIRG is sufficient to make it appear nearly unobscured in the mid-IR; and (4) the observed absence of deeply buried ULIRGs with large PAH equivalent widths is naturally explained by our models showing that deep absorption features are "filled-in" by small quantities of foreground unobscured PAH emission (e.g., from the host galaxy disk) at the level of ~1% the bolometric nuclear luminosity. The modeling and analysis we present will also serve as a powerful tool for interpreting the high angular resolution spectra of high-redshift sources to be obtained with the James Webb Space Telescope.
  • The Hubble Source Catalog (HSC) combines lists of sources detected on images obtained with the WFPC2, ACS and WFC3 instruments aboard the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) available in the Hubble Legacy Archive. The catalog contains time-domain information with about two million of its sources detected with the same instrument and filter in at least five HST visits. The Hubble Catalog of Variables (HCV) project aims to identify HSC sources showing significant brightness variations. A magnitude-dependent threshold in the median absolute deviation of photometric measurements (an outlier-resistant measure of lightcurve scatter) is adopted as the variability-detection statistic. It is supplemented with a cut in $\chi_{\rm red}^2$ that removes sources with large photometric errors. A pre-processing procedure involving bad image identification, outlier rejection and computation of local magnitude zero-point corrections is applied to HSC lightcurves before computing the variability detection statistic. About 52000 HSC sources are identified as candidate variables, among which 7800 show variability in more than one filter. Visual inspection suggests that $\sim 70\%$ of the candidates detected in multiple filters are true variables while the remaining $\sim 30\%$ are sources with aperture photometry corrupted by blending, imaging artifacts or image processing anomalies. The candidate variables have AB magnitudes in the range 15-27$^{m}$ with the median 22$^{m}$. Among them are the stars in our own and nearby galaxies as well as active galactic nuclei.
  • We report the first scientific results from the NELIOTA (NEO Lunar Impacts and Optical TrAnsients) project, which has recently begun lunar monitoring observations with the 1.2-m Kryoneri telescope. NELIOTA aims to detect faint impact flashes produced by near-Earth meteoroids and asteroids and thereby help constrain the size-frequency distribution of near-Earth objects in the decimeter to meter range. The NELIOTA setup, consisting of two fast-frame cameras observing simultaneously in the $R$ and $I-$bands, enables - for the first time - direct analytical calculation of the flash temperatures. We present the first 10 flashes detected, for which we find temperatures in the range ~1,600-3,100 K, in agreement with theoretical values. Two of these flashes were detected on multiple frames in both filters and therefore yield the first measurements of the temperature drop for lunar flashes. In addition, we compute the impactor masses, which range between ~100 g and ~50 kg.
  • We report the detection of the CO(3-2) emission line from the host galaxy of Gamma Ray Burst (GRB) 080207 at $z$ = 2.086. This is the first detection of molecular gas in emission from a GRB host galaxy beyond redshift 1. We find this galaxy to be rich in molecular gas with a mass of $1.1 \times 10^{11}\,\rm M_{\odot}$ assuming $\alpha_{\rm CO}=$ 4.36 $\rm M_{\odot}(\rm K\,km\,s^{-1}\,pc^2)^{-1}$. The molecular gas mass fraction of the galaxy is $\sim$ 0.5, typical of star forming galaxies (SFGs) with similar stellar masses and redshifts. With a $\rm SFR_{FIR}$ of 260 $\rm M_{\odot}\,yr^{-1}$, we measure a molecular-gas-depletion timescale of 0.43 Gyr, near the peak of the depletion timescale distribution of SFGs at similar redshifts. Our findings are therefore in contradiction with the proposed molecular gas deficiency in GRB host galaxies. We argue that the reported molecular gas deficiency for GRB hosts could be the artifact of improper comparisons or neglecting the effect of the typical low metallicities of GRB hosts on the CO-to-molecular-gas conversion factor. We also compare the kinematics of the CO(3-2) emission line to that of the H$\alpha$ emission line from the host galaxy. We find the H$\alpha$ emission to have contributions from two separate components, a narrow and a broad one. The narrow component matches the CO emission well in velocity space. The broad component, with a FWHM of $\sim$ 1100 $\rm km\,s^{-1}$, is separated by $+390$ $\rm km\,s^{-1}$ in velocity space from the narrow component. We speculate this broad component to be associated with a powerful outflow in the host galaxy or in an interacting system.
  • The mid-infrared (IR) range contains many spectral features associated with large molecules and dust grains such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and silicates. These are usually very strong compared to fine-structure gas lines, and thus valuable in studying the spectral properties of faint distant galaxies. In this paper, we evaluate the capability of low-resolution mid-IR spectroscopic surveys of galaxies that could be performed by SPICA. The surveys are designed to address the question how star formation and black hole accretion activities evolved over cosmic time through spectral diagnostics of the physical conditions of the interstellar/circumnuclear media in galaxies. On the basis of results obtained with Herschel far-IR photometric surveys of distant galaxies and Spitzer and AKARI near- to mid-IR spectroscopic observations of nearby galaxies, we estimate the numbers of the galaxies at redshift z > 0.5, which are expected to be detected in the PAH features or dust continuum by a wide (10 deg^2) or deep (1 deg^2) blind survey, both for a given observation time of 600 hours. As by-products of the wide blind survey, we also expect to detect debris disks, through the mid-IR excess above the photospheric emission of nearby main-sequence stars, and we estimate their number. We demonstrate that the SPICA mid-IR surveys will efficiently provide us with unprecedentedly large spectral samples, which can be studied further in the far-IR with SPICA.
  • Our current knowledge of star formation and accretion luminosity at high-redshift (z>3-4), as well as the possible connections between them, relies mostly on observations in the rest-frame ultraviolet (UV), which are strongly affected by dust obscuration. Due to the lack of sensitivity of past and current infrared (IR) instrumentation, so far it has not been possible to get a glimpse into the early phases of the dust-obscured Universe. Among the next generation of IR observatories, SPICA, observing in the 12-350 micron range, will be the only facility that can enable us to make the required leap forward in understanding the obscured star-formation rate and black-hole accretion rate densities (SFRD and BHARD, respectively) with respect to what Spitzer and Herschel achieved in the mid- and far-IR at z<3. In particular, SPICA will have the unique ability to trace the evolution of the obscured SFRD and BHARD over cosmic time, from the peak of their activity back to the reionisation epoch (i.e., 3<z<6-7), where its predecessors had severe limitations. Here we discuss the potential of both deep and shallow photometric surveys performed with the SPICA mid-IR instrument (SMI), enabled by the very low level of impact of dust obscuration in a band centred at 34 micron. These unique unbiased photometric surveys that SPICA will perform will be followed up by observations both with the SPICA spectrometers and with other facilities at shorter and longer wavelengths, with the aim to fully characterise the evolution of AGNs and star-forming galaxies after re-ionisation.
  • A far-infrared observatory such as the {\it SPace Infrared telescope for Cosmology and Astrophysics} ({\it SPICA}), with its unprecedented spectroscopic sensitivity, would unveil the role of feedback in galaxy evolution during the last $\sim10$ Gyr of the Universe ($z=1.5-2$), through the use of far- and mid-infrared molecular and ionic fine structure lines that trace outflowing and infalling gas. Outflowing gas is identified in the far-infrared through P-Cygni line shapes and absorption blueshifted wings in molecular lines with high dipolar moments, and through emission line wings of fine-structure lines of ionized gas. We quantify the detectability of galaxy-scale massive molecular and ionized outflows as a function of redshift in AGN-dominated, starburst-dominated, and main-sequence galaxies, explore the detectability of metal-rich inflows in the local Universe, and describe the most significant synergies with other current and future observatories that will measure feedback in galaxies via complementary tracers at other wavelengths.
  • We present an analysis of [OI]63, [OIII]88, [NII]122 and [CII]158 far-infrared (FIR) fine-structure line observations obtained with Herschel/PACS, for ~240 local luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) in the Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey (GOALS). We find pronounced declines -deficits- of line-to-FIR-continuum emission for [NII]122, [OI]63 and [CII]158 as a function of FIR color and infrared luminosity surface density, $\Sigma_{\rm IR}$. The median electron density of the ionized gas in LIRGs, based on the [NII]122/[NII]205 ratio, is $n_{\rm e}$ = 41 cm$^{-3}$. We find that the dispersion in the [CII]158 deficit of LIRGs is attributed to a varying fractional contribution of photo-dissociation-regions (PDRs) to the observed [CII]158 emission, f([CII]PDR) = [CII]PDR/[CII], which increases from ~60% to ~95% in the warmest LIRGs. The [OI]63/[CII]158PDR ratio is tightly correlated with the PDR gas kinetic temperature in sources where [OI]63 is not optically-thick or self-absorbed. For each galaxy, we derive the average PDR hydrogen density, $n_{\rm H}$, and intensity of the interstellar radiation field, in units of G$_0$, and find G$_0$/$n_{\rm H}$ ratios ~0.1-50 cm$^3$, with ULIRGs populating the upper end of the distribution. There is a relation between G$_0$/$n_{\rm H}$ and $\Sigma_{\rm IR}$, showing a critical break at $\Sigma_{\rm IR}^{\star}$ ~ 5 x 10$^{10}$ Lsun/kpc$^2$. Below $\Sigma_{\rm IR}^{\star}$, G$_0$/$n_{\rm H}$ remains constant, ~0.32 cm$^3$, and variations in $\Sigma_{\rm IR}$ are driven by the number density of star-forming regions within a galaxy, with no change in their PDR properties. Above $\Sigma_{\rm IR}^{\star}$, G$_0$/$n_{\rm H}$ increases rapidly with $\Sigma_{\rm IR}$, signaling a departure from the typical PDR conditions found in normal star-forming galaxies towards more intense/harder radiation fields and compact geometries typical of starbursting sources.
  • We aim to construct an exceptionally deep (V ~< 27) catalog of variable objects in selected Galactic and extragalactic fields visited multiple times by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). While HST observations of some of these fields were searched for specific types of variables before (most notably, the extragalactic Cepheids), we attempt a systematic study of the population of variable objects of all types at the magnitude range not easily accessible with ground-based telescopes. The variability timescales that can be probed range from hours to years depending on how often a particular field has been visited. For source extraction and cross-matching of sources between visits we rely on the Hubble Source Catalog which includes 10^7 objects detected with WFPC2, ACS, and WFC3 HST instruments. The lightcurves extracted from the HSC are corrected for systematic effects by applying local zero-point corrections and are screened for bad measurements. For each lightcurve we compute variability indices sensitive to a broad range of variability types. The indices characterize the overall lightcurve scatter and smoothness. Candidate variables are selected as having variability index values significantly higher than expected for objects of similar brightness in the given set of observations. The Hubble Catalog of Variables will be released in 2018.
  • The Hubble Catalog of Variables (HCV) is a 3 year ESA funded project that aims to develop a set of algorithms to identify variables among the sources included in the Hubble Source Catalog (HSC) and produce the HCV. We will process all HSC sources with more than a predefined number of measurements in a single filter/instrument combination and compute a range of lightcurve features to determine the variability status of each source. At the end of the project, the first release of the Hubble Catalog of Variables will be made available at the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes (MAST) and the ESA Science Archives. The variability detection pipeline will be implemented at the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) so that updated versions of the HCV may be created following the future releases of the HSC.
  • The physical mechanisms driving star formation (SF) in galaxies are still not fully understood. Tidal dwarf galaxies (TDGs), made of gas ejected during galaxy interactions, seem to be devoid of dark matter and have a near-solar metallicity. The latter makes it possible to study molecular gas and its link to SF using standard tracers (CO, dust) in a peculiar environment. We present a detailed study of a nearby TDG in the Virgo Cluster, VCC 2062, using new high-resolution CO(1--0) data from the Plateau de Bure, deep optical imaging from the Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey (NGVS), and complementary multiwavelength data. Until now, there was some doubt whether VCC 2062 was a true TDG, but the new deep optical images from the NGVS reveal a stellar bridge between VCC 2062 and its parent galaxy, NGC 4694, which is clear proof of its tidal origin. Several high-resolution tracers (\halpha, UV, 8~\mi, and 24~\mi) of the star formation rate (SFR) are compared to the molecular gas distribution as traced by the CO(1-0). Coupled with the SFR tracers, the NGVS data are used with the CIGALE code to model the stellar populations throughout VCC 2062, yielding a declining SFR in the recent past, consistent with the low \halpha/UV ratio, and a high burst strength. HI emission covers VCC 2062, whereas the CO is concentrated near the HI maxima. The CO peaks correspond to two very distinct regions: one with moderate SF to the NE and one with only slightly weaker CO emission but with nearly no SF. Even where SF is clearly present, the SFR is below the value expected from the surface density of the molecular and the total gas as compared to spiral galaxies and other TDGs. After discussing different possible explanations, we conclude that the low surface brightness is a crucial parameter to understand the low SFR.
  • We present an analysis of the morphological classification of 89 luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) from the Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey (GOALS) sample using non-parametric coefficients and compare their morphology as a function of wavelength. We rely on images obtained in the optical (B- and I-band) as well as in the infrared (H-band and 5.8$\mu$m). Our classification is based on the calculation of $Gini$ and the second order of light ($M_{20}$) non-parametric coefficients which we explore as a function of stellar mass ($M_\star$), infrared luminosity ($L_{IR}$) and star formation rate (SFR). We investigate the relation between $M_{20}$, the specific SFR (sSFR) and the dust temperature ($T_{dust}$) in our galaxy sample. We find that $M_{20}$ is a better morphological tracer than $Gini$, as it allows to distinguish systems formed by double systems from isolated and post-merger LIRGs. The multi-wavelength analysis allows us to identify a region in the $Gini$-$M_{20}$ parameter space where ongoing mergers reside, regardless of the band used to calculate the coefficients. In particular when measured in the H-band, this region can be used to identify ongoing mergers, with a minimal contamination from LIRGs in other stages. We also find that while the sSFR is positively correlated with $M_{20}$ when measured in the mid-infrared, i.e. star-bursting galaxies show more compact emission, it is anti-correlated with the B-band based $M_{20}$. We interpret this as the spatial decoupling between obscured and un-obscured star formation, whereby the ultraviolet/optical size of a LIRGs experience an intense dust enshrouded central starburst is larger than in the one in the mid-infrared since the contrast between the nuclear to the extended disk emission is smaller in the mid-infrared. This has important implications for high redshift surveys of dusty sources. [abridged]
  • [Abridged] In high density environment, the gas content of galaxies is stripped, leading to a rapid quenching of their star formation activity. This dramatic environmental effect is generally not taken into account in the SFHs usually assumed to perform spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting of these galaxies, yielding to a poor fit of their stellar emission and, consequently, a biased estimate of the SFR. We aim at reproducing the SFH of galaxies that underwent a rapid star formation quenching using a truncated delayed SFH that we implemented in the SED fitting code CIGALE. We show that the ratio between the instantaneous SFR and the SFR just before the quenching ($r_{SFR}$) is well constrained as long as rest frame UV data are available. This SED modelling is applied to the Herschel Reference Survey (HRS) containing isolated galaxies and sources falling in the dense environment of the Virgo cluster. The latter are HI-deficient due to ram pressure stripping. We show that the truncated delayed SFH successfully reproduces their SED while typical SFH assumptions fail. A good correlation is found between $r_{SFR}$ and HI-def, the parameter quantifying the gas deficiency of cluster galaxies, meaning that SED fitting results can be used to provide a tentative estimate of the gas deficiency of galaxies for which HI observations are not available. The HRS galaxies are placed on the SFR-$M_*$ diagram showing that the HI-deficient sources lie in the quiescent region confirming previous studies. Using the $r_{SFR}$ parameter, we derive the SFR of these sources before quenching and show that they were previously on the main sequence relation. We show that the $r_{SFR}$ parameter is also well recovered for deeply obscured high redshift sources, as well as in absence of IR data. SED fitting is thus a powerful tool to identify galaxies that underwent a rapid star formation quenching.
  • NELIOTA is a new ESA activity launched at the National Observatory of Athens in February 2015 aiming to determine the distribution and frequency of small near-earth objects (NEOs) via lunar monitoring. The project involves upgrading the 1.2m Kryoneri telescope at the National Observatory of Athens, procuring two fast-frame cameras, and developing a software system, which will control the telescope and the cameras, process the images and automatically detect NEO impacts. NELIOTA will provide a web-based user interface, where the impact events will be reported and made available to the scientific community and the general public. The objective of this 3.5 year activity is to design, develop and implement a highly automated lunar monitoring system, which will conduct an observing campaign for 2 years in search of NEO impact flashes on the Moon. The impact events will be verified, characterised and reported. The 1.2m telescope will be capable of detecting flashes much fainter than current, small-aperture, lunar monitoring telescopes. NELIOTA is therefore expected to characterise the frequency and distribution of NEOs weighing as little as a few grams.
  • We have recently compiled a database with all doctoral dissertations (PhDs) completed in modern Greece (1837-2014), in the general area of astronomy and astrophysics, as well as in space and ionospheric physics. A preliminary statistical analysis of the data is presented, along with a discussion of the general trends observed.
  • We propose a new method of pushing $Herschel$ to its faintest detection limits using universal trends in the redshift evolution of the far infrared over 24$\mu$m colours in the well-sampled GOODS-North field. An extension to other fields with less multi-wavelength information is presented. This method is applied here to raise the contribution of individually detected $Herschel$ sources to the cosmic infrared background (CIRB) by a factor 5 close to its peak at 250$\mu$m and more than 3 in the 350$\mu$m and 500$\mu$m bands. We produce realistic mock $Herschel$ images of the deep PACS and SPIRE images of the GOODS-North field from the GOODS-$Herschel$ Key Program and use them to quantify the confusion noise at the position of individual sources, i.e., estimate a "local confusion noise". Two methods are used to identify sources with reliable photometric accuracy extracted using 24$\mu$m prior positions. The clean index (CI), previously defined but validated here with simulations, which measures the presence of bright 24$\mu$m neighbours and the photometric accuracy index (PAI) directly extracted from the mock $Herschel$ images. After correction for completeness, thanks to our mock $Herschel$ images, individually detected sources make up as much as 54% and 60% of the CIRB in the PACS bands down to 1.1 mJy at 100$\mu$m and 2.2 mJy at 160$\mu$m and 55, 33, and 13% of the CIRB in the SPIRE bands down to 2.5, 5, and 9 mJy at 250$\mu$m, 350$\mu$m, and 500$\mu$m, respectively. The latter depths improve the detection limits of $Herschel$ by factors of 5 at 250$\mu$m, and 3 at 350$\mu$m and 500$\mu$m as compared to the standard confusion limit. Interestingly, the dominant contributors to the CIRB in all $Herschel$ bands appear to be distant siblings of the Milky Way ($z$$\sim$0.96 for $\lambda$$<$300$\mu$m) with a stellar mass of $M_{\star}$$\sim$9$\times$10$^{10}$M$_{\odot}$.
  • [abridged] We use the latest release of CIGALE, a galaxy SED fitting model relying on energy balance, to study the influence of an AGN in estimating both the SFR and stellar mass in galaxies, as well as the contribution of the AGN to the power output of the host. Using the galaxy formation SAM GALFORM, we create mock galaxy SEDs using realistic star formation histories (SFH) and add an AGN of Type 1, Type 2, or intermediate type whose contribution to the bolometric luminosity can be variable. We perform an SED fitting of these catalogues with CIGALE assuming three different SFHs: a single- and double-exponentially-decreasing, and a delayed SFH. Constraining thecontribution of an AGN to the LIR (fracAGN) is very challenging for fracAGN<20%, with uncertainties of ~5-30% for higher fractions depending on the AGN type, while FIR and sub-mm are essential. The AGN power has an impact on the estimation of $M_*$ in Type 1 and intermediate type AGNs but has no effect for galaxies hosting Type 2 AGNs. We find that in the absence of AGN emission, the best estimates of $M_*$ are obtained using the double-exponentially-decreasing model but at the expense of realistic ages of the stellar population. The delayed SFH model provides good estimates of $M_*$ and SFR, with a maximum offset of 10% as well as better estimates of the age. Our analysis shows that the underestimation of the SFR increases with fracAGN for Type 1 systems, as well as for low contributions of an intermediate AGN type, but it is quite insensitive to the emission of Type 2 AGNs up to fracAGN~45%. Similarly the UV emission is critical in accurately retrieving the $M_*$ for Type 1 and intermediate type AGN, and the SFR of all of the three AGN types. We show that the presence of AGN emission introduces a scatter to the SFR-$M_*$ main sequence relation derived from SED fitting, which is driven by the uncertainties on $M_*$.
  • (Ultra) Luminous Infrared Galaxies ((U)LIRGs) are objects characterized by their extreme infrared (8-1000 $\mu$m) luminosities ($L_{LIRG}>10^{11} $L$_\odot$ and $L_{ULIRG}>10^{12}$ L$_\odot$). The Herschel Comprehensive ULIRG Emission Survey (HerCULES; PI van der Werf) presents a representative flux-limited sample of 29 (U)LIRGs that spans the full luminosity range of these objects (10$^{11}\leq L_\odot \geq10^{13}$). With the \emph{Herschel Space Observatory}, we observe [CII] 157 $\mu$m, [OI] 63 $\mu$m, and [OI] 145 $\mu$m line emission with PACS, CO J=4-3 through J=13-12, [CI] 370 $\mu$m, and [CI] 609 $\mu$m with SPIRE, and low-J CO transitions with ground-based telescopes. The CO ladders of the sample are separated into three classes based on their excitation level. In 13 of the galaxies, the [OI] 63 $\mu$m emission line is self absorbed. Comparing the CO excitation to the IRAS 60/100 $\mu$m ratio and to far infrared luminosity, we find that the CO excitation is more correlated to the far infrared colors. We present cooling budgets for the galaxies and find fine-structure line flux deficits in the [CII], [SiII], [OI], and [CI] lines in the objects with the highest far IR fluxes, but do not observe this for CO $4\leq J_{upp}\leq13$. In order to study the heating of the molecular gas, we present a combination of three diagnostic quantities to help determine the dominant heating source. Using the CO excitation, the CO J=1-0 linewidth, and the AGN contribution, we conclude that galaxies with large CO linewidths always have high-excitation CO ladders, and often low AGN contributions, suggesting that mechanical heating is important.
  • We present ALMA Cycle-0 observations of the CO (6-5) line emission and of the 435um dust continuum emission in the central kpc of NGC 1614, a local luminous infrared galaxy (LIRG) at a distance of 67.8 Mpc (1 arcsec = 329 pc). The CO emission is well resolved by the ALMA beam (0".26 x 0".20) into a circum-nuclear ring, with an integrated flux of f_{CO(6-5)} = 898 (+-153) Jy km/s, which is 63(+-12)% of the total CO(6-5) flux measured by Herschel. The molecular ring, located between 100pc < r < 350pc from the nucleus, looks clumpy and includes seven unresolved (or marginally resolved) knots with median velocity dispersion of 40 km/s. These knots are associated with strong star formation regions with \Sigma_{SFR} 100 M_\sun/yr/kpc^{2} and \Sigma_{Gas} 1.0E4 M_\sun/pc^{2}. The non-detections of the nucleus in both the CO (6-5) line emission and the 435um continuum rule out, with relatively high confidence, a Compton-thick AGN in NGC 1614. Comparisons with radio continuum emission show a strong deviation from an expected local correlation between \Sigma_{Gas} and \Sigma_{SFR}, indicating a breakdown of the Kennicutt-Schmidt law on the linear scale of 100 pc.
  • We present archival Spitzer photometry and spectroscopy, and Herschel photometry, of the peculiar "Green Valley" elliptical galaxy NGC~3226. The galaxy, which contains a low-luminosity AGN, forms a pair with NGC~3227, and is shown to lie in a complex web of stellar and HI filaments. Imaging at 8 and 16$\mu$m reveals a curved plume structure 3 kpc in extent, embedded within the core of the galaxy, and coincident with the termination of a 30 kpc-long HI tail. In-situ star formation associated with the IR plume is identified from narrow-band HST imaging. The end of the IR-plume coincides with a warm molecular hydrogen disk and dusty ring, containing 0.7-1.1 $\times$ 10$^7$ M$_{\odot}$ detected within the central kpc. Sensitive upper limits to the detection of cold molecular gas may indicate that a large fraction of the H$_2$ is in a warm state. Photometry, derived from the UV to the far-IR, shows evidence for a low star formation rate of $\sim$0.04 M$_{\odot}$ yr$^{-1}$ averaged over the last 100 Myrs. A mid-IR component to the Spectral Energy Distribution (SED) contributes $\sim$20$\%$ of the IR luminosity of the galaxy, and is consistent with emission associated with the AGN. The current measured star formation rate is insufficient to explain NGC3226's global UV-optical "green" colors via the resurgence of star formation in a "red and dead" galaxy. This form of "cold accretion" from a tidal stream would appear to be an inefficient way to rejuvenate early-type galaxies, and may actually inhibit star formation.
  • We present spectra obtained with the Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) on the Spitzer Space Telescope of 33 K giants and 20 A dwarfs to assess their suitability as spectrophotometric standard stars. The K giants confirm previous findings that the strength of the SiO absorption band at 8 um increases for both later optical spectral classes and redder (B-V)_0 colors, but with considerable scatter. For K giants, the synthetic spectra underpredict the strengths of the molecular bands from SiO and OH. For these reasons, the assumed true spectra for K giants should be based on neither the assumption that molecular band strengths in the infrared can be predicted accurately from optical spectral class or color nor synthetric spectra. The OH bands in K giants grow stronger with cooler stellar temperatures, and they are stronger than predicted by synthetic spectra. As a group, A dwarfs are better behaved and more predictable than the K giants, but they are more likely to show red excesses from debris disks. No suitable A dwarfs were located in parts of the sky continuously observable from Spitzer, and with previous means of estimating the true spectra of K giants ruled out, it was necessary to use models of A dwarfs to calibrate spectra of K giants from observed spectral ratios of the two groups and then use the calibrated K giants as standards for the full database of infrared spectra from Spitzer. We also describe a lingering artifact that affects the spectra of faint blue sources at 24 um.
  • Luminous infrared galaxies are systems enshrouded in dust, which absorbs most of their optical/UV emission and re-radiates it in the mid- and far-infrared. Radio observations are largely unaffected by dust obscuration, enabling us to study the central regions of LIRGs in an unbiased manner. The main goal of this project is to examine how the radio properties of local LIRGs relate to their infrared spectral characteristics. Here we present an analysis of the radio continuum properties of a subset of the Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey (GOALS), which consists of 202 nearby systems (z<0.088). Our radio sample consists of 35 systems, or 46 individual galaxies, that were observed at both 1.49 and 8.44 GHz with the VLA with a resolution of about 1 arcsec (FWHM). The aim of the project is to use the radio imagery to probe the central kpc of these LIRGs in search of active galactic nuclei. We used the archival data at 1.49 and 8.44 GHz to create radio-spectral-index maps using the standard relation between flux density Sv and frequency v, S~v^-a, where a is the radio spectral index. By studying the spatial variations in a, we classified the objects as radio-AGN, radio-SB, and AGN/SB (a mixture). We identified the presence of an active nucleus using the radio morphology, deviations from the radio/infrared correlation, and spatially resolved spectral index maps, and then correlated this to the usual mid-infrared ([NeV]/[NeII] and [OIV]/[NeII] line ratios and EQW of the 6.2 um PAH feature) and optical (BPT diagram) AGN diagnostics. We find that 21 out of the 46 objects in our sample are radio-AGN, 9 are classified as starbursts (SB), and 16 are AGN/SB. After comparing to other AGN diagnostics we find 3 objects out of the 46 that are identified as AGN based on the radio analysis, but are not classified as such based on the mid-infrared and optical AGN diagnostics presented in this study.
  • We present Herschel/PACS observations of extended [CII]157.7{\mu}m line emission detected on ~ 1 - 10 kpc scales in 60 local luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) from the Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey (GOALS). We find that most of the extra-nuclear emission show [CII]/FIR ratios >~ 4 x 10^-3, larger than the mean ratio seen in the nuclei, and similar to those found in the extended disks of normal star-forming galaxies and the diffuse inter-stellar medium (ISM) of our Galaxy. The [CII] "deficits" found in the most luminous local LIRGs are therefore restricted to their nuclei. There is a trend for LIRGs with warmer nuclei to show larger differences between their nuclear and extra-nuclear [CII]/FIR ratios. We find an anti-correlation between [CII]/FIR and the luminosity surface density, {\Sigma}_IR, for the extended emission in the spatially-resolved galaxies. However, there is an offset between this trend and that found for the LIRG nuclei. We use this offset to derive a beam filling-factor for the star-forming regions within the LIRG disks of ~ 6 % relative to their nuclei. We confront the observed trend to photo-dissociation region (PDR) models and find that the slope of the correlation is much shallower than the model predictions. Finally, we compare the correlation found between [CII]/FIR and {\Sigma}_IR with measurements of high-redshift starbursting IR-luminous galaxies.
  • We present our initial results on the CO rotational spectral line energy distribution (SLED) of the $J$ to $J$$-$1 transitions from $J=4$ up to $13$ from Herschel SPIRE spectroscopic observations of 65 luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) in the Great Observatories All-Sky LIRG Survey (GOALS). The observed SLEDs change on average from one peaking at $J \le 4$ to a broad distribution peaking around $J \sim\,$6$-$7 as the IRAS 60-to-100 um color, $C(60/100)$, increases. However, the ratios of a CO line luminosity to the total infrared luminosity, $L_{\rm IR}$, show the smallest variation for $J$ around 6 or 7. This suggests that, for most LIRGs, ongoing star formation (SF) is also responsible for a warm gas component that emits CO lines primarily in the mid-$J$ regime ($5 \lesssim J \lesssim 10$). As a result, the logarithmic ratios of the CO line luminosity summed over CO (5$-$4), (6$-$5), (7$-$6), (8$-$7) and (10$-$9) transitions to $L_{\rm IR}$, $\log R_{\rm midCO}$, remain largely independent of $C(60/100)$, and show a mean value of $-4.13$ ($\equiv \log R^{\rm SF}_{\rm midCO}$) and a sample standard deviation of only 0.10 for the SF-dominated galaxies. Including additional galaxies from the literature, we show, albeit with small number of cases, the possibility that galaxies, which bear powerful interstellar shocks unrelated to the current SF, and galaxies, in which an energetic active galactic nucleus contributes significantly to the bolometric luminosity, have their $R_{\rm midCO}$ higher and lower than $R^{\rm SF}_{\rm midCO}$, respectively.
  • We present ALMA Cycle-0 observations of the CO (6-5) line emission (rest-frame frequency = 691.473 GHz) and of the 435$\mu m$ dust continuum emission in the nuclear region of NGC 34, a local luminous infrared galaxy (LIRG) at a distance of 84 Mpc (1" = 407 pc) which contains a Seyfert 2 active galactic nucleus (AGN) and a nuclear starburst. The CO emission is well resolved by the ALMA beam ($\rm 0."26\times 0."23$), with an integrated flux of $\rm f_{CO~(6-5)} = 1004\; (\pm 151) \; Jy\; km\; s^{-1}$. Both the morphology and kinematics of the CO (6-5) emission are rather regular, consistent with a compact rotating disk with a size of 200 pc. A significant emission feature is detected on the red-shifted wing of the line profile at the frequency of the $\rm H^{13}CN\; (8-7)$ line, with an integrated flux of $\rm 17.7 \pm 2.1 (random) \pm 2.7 (sysmatic)\; Jy\;km\; s^{-1}$. However, it cannot be ruled out that the feature is due to an outflow of warm dense gas with a mean velocity of $\rm 400\; km\; s^{-1}$. The continuum is resolved into an elongated configuration, and the observed flux corresponds to a dust mass of $\rm M_{dust} = 10^{6.97\pm 0.13}\; M_{sun}$. An unresolved central core ($\rm radius \simeq 50\; pc$) contributes $28\%$ of the continuum flux and $19\%$ of the CO (6-5) flux, consistent with insignificant contributions of the AGN to both emissions. Both the CO (6-5) and continuum spatial distributions suggest a very high gas column density ($\rm >= 10^4\; M_{sun}\; pc^{-2}$) in the nuclear region at $\rm radius <= 100\; pc$.