• In September 2016, the microquasar Cygnus X-3 underwent a giant radio flare, which was monitored for 6 days with the Medicina Radio Astronomical Station and the Sardinia Radio Telescope. Long observations were performed in order to follow the evolution of the flare on a hourly scale, covering six frequency ranges from 1.5 GHz to 25.6 GHz. The radio emission reached a maximum of 13.2 +/- 0.7 Jy at 7.2 GHz and 10 +/- 1 Jy at 18.6 GHz. Rapid flux variations were observed at high radio frequencies at the peak of the flare, together with rapid evolution of the spectral index: alpha steepened from 0.3 to 0.6 within 5 hours. This is the first time that such fast variations are observed, giving support to the evolution from optically thick to optically thin plasmons in expansion moving outward from the core. Based on the Italian network (Noto, Medicina and SRT) and extended to the European antennas (Torun, Yebes, Onsala), VLBI observations were triggered at 22 GHz on five different occasions, four times prior to the giant flare, and once during its decay phase. Flux variations of 2-hour duration were recorded during the first session. They correspond to a mini-flare that occurred close to the core ten days before the onset of the giant flare. From the latest VLBI observation we infer that four days after the flare peak the jet emission was extended over 30 mas.
  • We present a multi-epoch hard X-ray analysis of Cygnus X-1 in its soft state based on four observations with NuSTAR. Despite the basic similarity of the observed spectra, there is clear spectral variability between epochs. To investigate this variability, we construct a model incorporating both the standard disk-corona continuum and relativistic reflection from the accretion disk, based on prior NuSTAR work on Cygnus X-1, and apply this model to each epoch independently. We find excellent consistency for the black hole spin, and the iron abundance of the accretion disk, which are expected to remain constant on observational timescales. In particular, we confirm that Cygnus X-1 hosts a rapidly rotating black hole, 0.93<a*<0.96, in broad agreement with the majority of prior studies of the relativistic disk reflection and constraints on the spin obtained through studies of the thermal accretion disk continuum. Our work also confirms the apparent misalignment between the inner disk and the orbital plane of the binary system reported previously, finding the magnitude of this warp to be ~10-15deg. This level of misalignment does not significantly change (and may even improve) the agreement between our reflection results and the thermal continuum results regarding the black hole spin. The spectral variability observed by NuSTAR is dominated by the primary continuum, implying variability in the temperature of the scattering electron plasma. Finally, we consistently observe absorption from ionized iron at ~6.7 keV, which varies in strength as a function of orbital phase in a manner consistent with the absorbing material being an ionized phase of the focused stellar wind from the supergiant companion star.
  • We present results from spectral fitting of the very high state of GX~339-4 with NuSTAR and Swift. We use relativistic reflection modelling to measure the spin of the black hole and inclination of the inner disk, and find a spin of $a=0.95^{+0.02}_{-0.08}$ and inclination of $30${\deg}$\pm1$ (statistical errors). These values agree well with previous results from reflection modelling. With the exceptional sensitivity of NuSTAR at the high-energy side of the disk spectrum, we are able to constrain multiple physical parameters simultaneously using continuum fitting. By using the constraints from reflection as input for the continuum fitting method, we invert the conventional fitting procedure to estimate the mass and distance of GX~339-4 using just the X-ray spectrum, finding a mass of $9.0^{+1.6}_{-1.2}M_\odot$ and distance of $8.4\pm0.9$ kpc (statistical errors).
  • We studied time variability and spectral evolution of the Galactic black hole transient Swift J174510.8-262411 during the first phase of its outburst. INTEGRAL and Swift observations collected from 2012 September 16 until October 30 have been used. The total squared fractional rms values did not drop below 5% and QPOs, when present, were type-C, indicating that the source never made the transition to the soft-intermediate state. Even though the source was very bright (up to 1 Crab in hard X-rays), it showed a so called failed outburst as it never reached the soft state. XRT and IBIS broad band spectra, well represented by a hybrid thermal/non-thermalComptonisationmodel, showed physical parameters characteristic of the hard and intermediate states. In particular, the derived temperature of the geometrically thin disc black body was about 0.6 keV at maximum.We found a clear decline of the optical depth of the corona electrons (close to values of 0.1), as well as of the total compactness ratio lh/ls. The hard-to-hard/intermediate state spectral transition is mainly driven by the increase in the soft photon flux in the corona, rather than small variations of the electron heating. This, associated with the increasing of the disc temperature, is consistent with a disc moving towards the compact object scenario, i.e. the truncated-disc model. Moreover, this scenario is consistent with the decreasing fractional squared rms and increasing of the noise and QPO frequency. In our final group of observations, we found that the contribution from the non-thermal Comptonisation to the total power supplied to the plasma is 0.59+0.02/-0.05 and that the thermal electrons cool to kTe<26 keV.
  • After 25 years of quiescence, the microquasar V404 Cyg entered a new period of activity in June 2015. This X-ray source is known to undergo extremely bright and variable outbursts seen at all wavelengths. It is therefore an object of prime interest to understand the accretion-ejection connections. These can, however, only be probed through simultaneous observations at several wavelengths. We made use of the INTEGRAL instruments to obtain long, almost uninterrupted observations from 2015 June 20$^{\mathrm{th}}$, 15:50 UTC to June 25$^{\mathrm{th}}$, 4:05 UTC, from the optical V-band, up to the soft $\gamma$-rays. V404 Cyg was extremely variable in all bands, with the detection of 18 flares with fluxes exceeding 6 Crab (20--40 keV) within 3 days. The flare recurrence can be as short as $\sim$ 20~min from peak to peak. A model-independent analysis shows that the $>$6 Crab flares have a hard spectrum. A simple 10--400 keV spectral analysis of the off-flare and flare periods shows that the variation in intensity is likely to be due to variations of a cut-off power law component only. The optical flares seem to be at least of two different types: one occurring in simultaneity with the X-ray flares, the other showing a delay greater than 10 min. The former could be associated with X-ray reprocessing by either an accretion disk or the companion star. We suggest that the latter are associated with plasma ejections that have also been seen in radio.
  • We present spectral analysis of five NuSTAR and Swift observations of GX 339-4 taken during a failed outburst in summer 2013. These observations cover Eddington luminosity fractions in the range ~0.9-6%. Throughout this outburst, GX 339-4 stayed in the hard state, and all five observations show similar X-ray spectra with a hard power-law with a photon index near 1.6 and significant contribution from reflection. Using simple reflection models we find unrealistically high iron abundances. Allowing for different photon indices for the continuum incident on the reflector relative to the underlying observed continuum results in a statistically better fit and reduced iron abundances. With a photon index around 1.3, the input power-law on the reflector is significantly harder than that which is directly observed. We study the influence of different emissivity profiles and geometries and consistently find an improvement when using separate photon indices. The inferred inner accretion disk radius is strongly model dependent, but we do not find evidence for a truncation radius larger than 100 r_g in any model. The data do not allow independent spin constraints but the results are consistent with the literature (i.e., a>0). Our best-fit models indicate an inclination angle in the range 40-60 degrees, consistent with limits on the orbital inclination but higher than reported in the literature using standard reflection models. The iron line around 6.4 keV is clearly broadened, and we detect a superimposed narrow core as well. This core originates from a fluorescence region outside the influence of the strong gravity of the black hole and we discuss possible geometries.
  • We present simultaneous Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR ) and Suzaku observations of the X-ray binary Cygnus X-1 in the hard state. This is the first time this state has been observed in Cyg X-1 with NuSTAR, which enables us to study the reflection and broad-band spectra in unprecedented detail. We confirm that the iron line cannot be fit with a combination of narrow lines and absorption features, and instead requires a relativistically blurred profile in combination with a narrow line and absorption from the companion wind. We use the reflection models of Garcia et al. (2014) to simultaneously measure the black hole spin, disk inner radius, and coronal height in a self-consistent manner. Detailed fits to the iron line profile indicate a high level of relativistic blurring, indicative of reflection from the inner accretion disk. We find a high spin, a small inner disk radius, and a low source height, and rule out truncation to greater than three gravitational radii at the 3{\sigma} confidence level. In addition, we find that the line profile has not changed greatly in the switch from soft to hard states, and that the differences are consistent with changes in the underlying reflection spectrum rather than the relativistic blurring. We find that the blurring parameters are consistent when fitting either just the iron line or the entire broad-band spectrum, which is well modelled with a Comptonized continuum plus reflection model.
  • Polarization of the >~400 keV hard tail of the microquasar Cygnus X-1 has been independently reported by INTEGRAL/IBIS, and INTEGRAL/SPI and interpreted as emission from a compact jet. These conclusions were, however, based on the accumulation of all INTEGRAL data regardless of the spectral state. We utilize additional INTEGRAL exposure accumulated until December 2012, and include the AMI/Ryle (15 GHz) radio data in our study. We separate the observations into hard, soft, and intermediate/transitional states and detect radio emission from a compact jet in hard and intermediate states, but not in the soft. The 10-400 keV INTEGRAL (JEM-X and IBIS) state resolved spectra are well modeled with thermal Comptonization and reflection components. We detect a hard tail in the 0.4-2 MeV range for the hard state only. We extract the state dependent polarigrams of Cyg X-1, which all are compatible to no or undetectable level of polarization except in 400-2000 keV range in the hard state where the polarization fraction is 75$\pm$32 % and the polarization angle 40.0 +-14 deg. An upper limit on the 0.4-2 MeV soft state polarization fraction is 70%. Due to the short exposure, we obtain no meaningful constraint for the intermediate state. The likely detection of a >400 keV polarized tail in the hard state, together with the simultaneous presence of a radio jet, reinforce the notion of a compact jet origin of the 400 keV emission.
  • We present spectral analysis of NuSTAR and Swift observations of Cep X-4 during its outburst in 2014. We observed the source once during the peak of the outburst and once during the decay, finding good agreement in the spectral shape between the observations. We describe the continuum using a powerlaw with a Fermi-Dirac cutoff at high energies. Cep X-4 has a very strong cyclotron resonant scattering feature (CRSF) around 30 keV. A simple absorption-like line with a Gaussian optical depth or a pseudo-Lorentzian profile both fail to describe the shape of the CRSF accurately, leaving significant deviations at the red side of the line. We characterize this asymmetry with a second absorption feature around 19 keV. The line energy of the CRSF, which is not influenced by the addition of this feature, shows a small but significant positive luminosity dependence. With luminosities between (1-6)e36 erg/s, Cep X-4 is below the theoretical limit where such a correlation is expected. This behavior is similar to Vela X-1 and we discuss parallels between the two systems.
  • Binary systems with an accreting compact object are a unique chance to investigate the strong, clumpy, line-driven winds of early type supergiants by using the compact object's X-rays to probe the wind structure. We analyze the two-component wind of HDE 226868, the O9.7Iab giant companion of the black hole Cyg X-1 using 4.77 Ms of RXTE observations of the system taken over the course of 16 years. Absorption changes strongly over the 5.6 d binary orbit, but also shows a large scatter at a given orbital phase, especially at superior conjunction. The orbital variability is most prominent when the black hole is in the hard X-ray state. Our data are poorer for the intermediate and soft state, but show signs for orbital variability of the absorption column in the intermediate state. We quantitatively compare the data in the hard state to a toy model of a focussed Castor-Abbott-Klein-wind: as it does not incorporate clumping, the model does not describe the observations well. A qualitative comparison to a simplified simulation of clumpy winds with spherical clumps shows good agreement in the distribution of the equivalent hydrogen column density for models with a porosity length on the order of the stellar radius at inferior conjunction; we conjecture that the deviations between data and model at superior conjunction could be either due to lack of a focussed wind component in the model or a more complicated clump structure.
  • We present the most extensive analysis of Fourier-based X-ray timing properties of the black hole binary Cygnus X-1 to date, based on 12 years of bi-weekly monitoring with RXTE from 1999 to 2011. Our aim is a comprehensive study of timing behavior across all spectral states, including the elusive transitions and extreme hard and soft states. We discuss the dependence of the timing properties on spectral shape and photon energy, and study correlations between Fourier-frequency dependent coherence and time lags with features in the power spectra. Our main results are: (a) The fractional rms in the 0.125-256 Hz range in different spectral states shows complex behavior that depends on the energy range considered. It reaches its maximum not in the hard state, but in the soft state in the Comptonized tail above 10 keV. (b) The shape of power spectra in hard and intermediate states and the normalization in the soft state are strongly energy dependent in the 2.1-15 keV range. This emphasizes the need for an energy-dependent treatment of power spectra and a careful consideration of energy- and mass-scaling when comparing the variability of different source types, e.g., black hole binaries and AGN. PSDs during extremely hard and extremely soft states can be easily confused for energies above ~5 keV in the 0.125-256 Hz range. (c) The coherence between energy bands drops during transitions from the intermediate into the soft state but recovers in the soft state. (d) The time lag spectra in soft and intermediate states show distinct features at frequencies related to the frequencies of the main variability components seen in the power spectra and show the same shift to higher frequencies as the source softens. [...abridged] In particular, we discuss how the timing properties of Cyg X-1 can be used to assess the evolution of variability with spectral shape in other black hole binaries. [...abridged]
  • A study of archival RXTE, Swift, and Suzaku pointed observations of the transient high mass X-ray binary GRO J1008-57 is presented. A new orbital ephemeris based on pulse arrival timing shows times of maximum luminosities during outbursts of GRO J1008-57 to be close to periastron at orbital phase -0.03. This makes the source one of a few for which outburst dates can be predicted with very high precision. Spectra of the source in 2005, 2007, and 2011 can be well described by a simple power law with high energy cutoff and an additional black body at lower energies. The photon index of the power law and the black body flux only depend on the 15-50 keV source flux. No apparent hysteresis effects are seen. These correlations allow to predict the evolution of the pulsar's X-ray spectral shape over all outbursts as a function of just one parameter, the source's flux. If modified by an additional soft component, this prediction even holds during GRO J1008-57's 2012 type II outburst.
  • The knowledge of the spectral state of a black hole is essential for the interpretation of data from black holes in terms of their emission models. Based on pointed observations of Cyg X-1 with the Rossi X-ray timing Explorer (RXTE) that are used to classify simultaneous RXTE-ASM observations, we develop a scheme based on RXTE -ASM colors and count rates that can be used to classify all observations of this canonical black hole that were performed between 1996 and 2011. We show that a simple count rate criterion, as used previously, leads to a significantly higher fraction of misclassified observations. This scheme enables us to classify single INTEGRAL-IBIS science windows and to obtain summed spectra for the soft, intermediate and hard state with low contamination by other states.
  • We present a scheme to determine the spectral state of the canonical black hole Cyg X-1 using data from previous and current X-ray all sky monitors (RXTE-ASM, Swift-BAT, MAXI, and Fermi-GBM). State determinations of the hard/intermediate and soft state agree to better than 10% between different monitors, facilitating the determination of the state and its context for any observation of the source, potentially over the lifetimes of different individual monitors. A separation of the hard and the intermediate state, which strongly differ in their spectral shape and short-term timing behavior, is only possible when monitor data in the soft X-rays (<5 keV) are available. A statistical analysis of the states confirms the different activity patterns of the source (e.g., months to years long hard state periods or phases during which numerous transitions occurs). It also shows the hard and soft states to be stable, with the probability of Cyg X-1 remaining in a given state for at least one week to be larger than 85% for the hard state and larger than 75%, for the soft state. Intermediate states are short lived, with a probability of 50% that the source leaves the intermediate state within three days. A reliable detection of these potentially short-lived events is only possible with monitor data with a time resolution of better than 1 d.
  • IGR J18179-1621 is an obscured accreting X-ray pulsar discovered by INTEGRAL on 2012 February 29. We report on our 20 ksec Chandra-High Energy Transmission Gratings Spectrometer observation of the source performed on 2012 March 17, on two short contemporaneous Swift observations, and on our two near-infrared (K_s, H_n, and J_n) observations performed on 2012 March 13 and March 26. We determine the most accurate X-ray position of IGR J18179-1621, alpha_{J2000}=18 h 17m 52.18 s, delta_{J2000}=-16^\circ 21', 31.68" (90% uncertainty of 0.6"). A strong periodic variability at 11.82 s is clearly detected in the Chandra data, confirming the pulsating nature of the source, with the lightcurve softening at the pulse peak. The quasi-simultaneous Chandra-Swift spectra of IGR J18179-1621 can be well fit by a heavily absorbed hard power-law N_H =2.2+/-0.3 \times 10^{23} cm^{-2}, and photon index \Gamma = 0.4+/-0.1) with an average absorbed 2-8 keV flux of 1.4\times 10^{-11} erg cm^{-2} s^{-1}. At the Chandra-based position, a source is detected in our near infrared (NIR) maps with K_s = 13.14+/-0.04 mag, H_n = 16+/-0.1 mag, and no J_n band counterpart down to ~18 mag. The NIR source, compatible with 2MASS J18175218-1621316, shows no variability between 2012 March 13 and March 26. Searches of the UKIDSS database show similar NIR flux levels at epochs six months prior to and after a 2007 February 11 archival Chandra observation where the source's X-ray flux was at least 87 times fainter. In many ways IGR J18179-1621 is unusual: its combination of a several week long outburst (without evidence of repeated outbursts in the historical record), high absorption column (a large fraction of which is likely local to the system), and 11.82 s period does not fit neatly into existing X-ray binary categories.
  • The most peculiar radio characteristics of the TeV emitting high-mass X-ray binary LS I +61{\deg}303 are two periodicities: A large periodic outburst which exhibits the same period as the orbit (phase \Phi) and a second periodicity of 1667 days (phase \Theta) which modulates the orbital phase and amplitude of the large outburst. Recent analysis of the radio spectral index present strong evidence for the presence of the critical transition from optically thick emission (related to a steady jet) to an optically thin outburst (related to a transient jet) as in other microquasars. In parallel, a switch from a low/hard X-ray state to a transitional state (e.g. steep power law state) would be expected. We show how the critical transition from optically thick emission to an optically thin outburst is modulated by \Theta. Folding over a too large \Theta-interval mixes up important information about the outbursts and can yield a false picture of the emission behaviour of the source along the orbit. We therefore analyse the implications of this long period for treatment of hard X-ray/high energy data obtained from LS I +61{\deg}303, e.g. with Fermi-LAT or INTEGRAL, taking into account this long-term periodicity.
  • We present a timing and spectral analysis of the variable X-ray source 3A 1954+319. Our analysis is mainly based on an outburst serendipitously observed during INTEGRAL Key Program observations of the Cygnus region in 2008 fall and on the Swift/BAT longterm light curve. Previous observations, though sparse, have identified the source to be one of only nine known symbiotic X-ray binaries, i.e., systems composed of an accreting neutron star orbiting in a highly inhomogeneous medium around an M-giant companion. The spectrum of 3A 1954+319 above 20 keV can be best described by a broken power law model. The extremely long pulse period of ~5.3 hours is clearly visible in the INTEGRAL/ISGRI light curve and confirmed through an epoch folding period search. Furthermore, the light curve allows us to determine a very strong spin up of -2x10^-4 h/h during the outburst. This spin up is confirmed by the pulse period evolution calculated from Swift/BAT data. The Swift/BAT data also show a long spin-down trend prior to the 2008 outburst, which is confirmed in archival INTEGRAL/ISGRI data. We discuss possible accretion models and geometries allowing for the transfer of such large amounts of angular momentum and investigate the harder spectrum of this outburst compared to previously published results.
  • Because of their inherently high flux allowing the detection of clear signals, black hole X-ray binaries are interesting candidates for polarization studies, even if no polarization signals have been observed from them before. Such measurements would provide further detailed insight into these sources' emission mechanisms. We measured the polarization of the gamma-ray emission from the black hole binary system Cygnus X-1 with the INTEGRAL/IBIS telescope. Spectral modeling of the data reveals two emission mechanisms: The 250-400 keV data are consistent with emission dominated by Compton scattering on thermal electrons and are weakly polarized. The second spectral component seen in the 400keV-2MeV band is by contrast strongly polarized, revealing that the MeV emission is probably related to the jet first detected in the radio band.
  • We present a detailed analysis of observations of the high mass X-ray binary Cen X-3 spanning two consecutive binary orbits performed with the RXTE satellite in early March 1997. The PCA and HEXTE light curves both show a clear reduction in count rate after mid-orbit for both binary revolutions. We therefore analyze two broad band spectra for each orbit, before and after mid-orbit. Consistent with earlier observations these four joint PCA and HEXTE spectra can be well described using a phenomenological pulsar continuum model, including an iron emission line and a cyclotron resonance scattering feature. While no strong spectral variations were detected, the second half of orbit 2 shows a tendency toward being softer and more strongly absorbed. In order to follow the orbital phase-dependent evolution of the spectrum in greater detail, we model spectra for shorter exposures, confirming that most spectral parameters show either a gradual or sudden change for the second half of the second orbit. A comparison with a simple wind model indicates the existence of an accretion wake in this system. We also present and discuss high resolution pulse profiles for several different energy bands, as well as their hardness ratios. PCA and HEXTE spectra were created for 24 phase bins and fitted using the same model as in the phase averaged case. Systematic pulse phase-dependent variations of several continuum and cyclotron line parameters were detected, most notably a significant increase of the cyclotron line energy during the early rise of the main peak, followed by a gradual decrease. We show that applying a simple dipole model for the magnetic field is not sufficient to describe our data.
  • We present an evaluation of a simulated cosmic ray shower, based on {\sc geant4} and {\sc top-c}, which tracks all the particles in the shower. {\sc top-c} (Task Oriented Parallel C) provides a framework for parallel algorithm development which makes tractable the problem of following each particle. This method is compared with a simulation program which employs the Hillas thinning algorithm.
  • {\sc top-c} (Task Oriented Parallel C) is a freely available package for parallel computing. It is designed to be easy to learn and to have good tolerance for the high latencies that are common in commodity networks of computers. It has been successfully used in a wide range of examples, providing linear speedup with the number of computers. A brief overview of {\sc top-c} is provided, along with recent experience with cosmic ray physics simulations.