• Context: The first Gaia data release (DR1) delivered a catalogue of astrometry and photometry for over a billion astronomical sources. Within the panoply of methods used for data exploration, visualisation is often the starting point and even the guiding reference for scientific thought. However, this is a volume of data that cannot be efficiently explored using traditional tools, techniques, and habits. Aims: We aim to provide a global visual exploration service for the Gaia archive, something that is not possible out of the box for most people. The service has two main goals. The first is to provide a software platform for interactive visual exploration of the archive contents, using common personal computers and mobile devices available to most users. The second aim is to produce intelligible and appealing visual representations of the enormous information content of the archive. Methods: The interactive exploration service follows a client-server design. The server runs close to the data, at the archive, and is responsible for hiding as far as possible the complexity and volume of the Gaia data from the client. This is achieved by serving visual detail on demand. Levels of detail are pre-computed using data aggregation and subsampling techniques. For DR1, the client is a web application that provides an interactive multi-panel visualisation workspace as well as a graphical user interface. Results: The Gaia archive Visualisation Service offers a web-based multi-panel interactive visualisation desktop in a browser tab. It currently provides highly configurable 1D histograms and 2D scatter plots of Gaia DR1 and the Tycho-Gaia Astrometric Solution (TGAS) with linked views. An innovative feature is the creation of ADQL queries from visually defined regions in plots. [abridged]
  • We analyze the connectivity structure of weighted brain networks extracted from spontaneous magnetoencephalographic (MEG) signals of healthy subjects and epileptic patients (suffering from absence seizures) recorded at rest. We find that, for the activities in the 5-14 Hz range, healthy brains exhibit a sparse connectivity, whereas the brain networks of patients display a rich connectivity with clear modular structure. Our results suggest that modularity plays a key role in the functional organization of brain areas during normal and pathological neural activities at rest.
  • In this paper we propose an approach to homotopical algebra where the basic ingredient is a category with two classes of distinguished morphisms: strong and weak equivalences. These data determine the cofibrant objects by an extension property analogous to the classical lifting property of projective modules. We define a Cartan-Eilenberg category as a category with strong and weak equivalences such that there is an equivalence between its localization with respect to weak equivalences and the localised category of cofibrant objets with respect to strong equivalences. This equivalence allows us to extend the classical theory of derived additive functors to this non additive setting. The main examples include Quillen model categories and functor categories with a triple, in the last case we find examples in which the class of strong equivalences is not determined by a homotopy relation. Among other applications, we prove the existence of filtered minimal models for \emph{cdg} algebras over a zero-characteristic field and we formulate an acyclic models theorem for non additive functors.
  • We prove that for a topological operad $P$ the operad of oriented cubical chains, $C^{ord}_\ast(P)$, and the operad of singular chains, $S_\ast(P)$, are weakly equivalent. As a consequence, $C^{ord}_\ast(P;\mathbb{Q})$ is formal if and only if $S_\ast(P;\mathbb{Q})$ is formal, thus linking together some formality results spread in the literature. The proof is based on an acyclic models theorem for monoidal functors. We give different variants of the acyclic models theorem and apply the contravariant case to study the cohomology theories for simplicial sets defined by $R$-simplicial differential graded algebras.
  • Let overline{M}_{g,n} be the moduli space of stable algebraic curves of genus g with n marked points. With the operations which relate the different moduli spaces identifying marked points, the family (overline{M}_{g,n})_{g,n} is a modular operad of projective smooth Deligne-Mumford stacks, overline{M}. In this paper we prove that the modular operad of singular chains C_*(overline{M};Q) is formal; so it is weakly equivalent to the modular operad of its homology H_*(overline{M};Q). As a consequence, the "up to homotopy" algebras of these two operads are the same. To obtain this result we prove a formality theorem for operads analogous to Deligne-Griffiths-Morgan-Sullivan formality theorem, the existence of minimal models of modular operads, and a characterization of formality for operads which shows that formality is independent of the ground field.