• Asymptotic Giant Branch stars are known to produce `cosmic' fluorine but it is uncertain whether these stars are the main producers of fluorine in the Solar neighborhood or if any of the other proposed formation sites, type II supernovae and/or Wolf-Rayet stars, are more important. Recent articles have proposed both Asymptotic Giant Branch stars as well as type II supernovae as the dominant sources of fluorine in the Solar neighborhood. In this paper we set out to determine the fluorine abundance in a sample of 49 nearby, bright K-giants for which we previously have determined the stellar parameters as well as alpha abundances homogeneously from optical high-resolution spectra. The fluorine abundance is determined from a 2.3 $\mu$m HF molecular line observed with the spectrometer Phoenix. We compare the fluorine abundances with those of alpha elements mainly produced in type II supernovae and find that fluorine and the alpha-elements do not evolve in lock-step, ruling out type II supernovae as the dominating producers of fluorine in the Solar neighborhood. Furthermore, we find a secondary behavior of fluorine with respect to oxygen, which is another evidence against the type II supernovae playing a large role in the production of fluorine in the Solar neighborhood. This secondary behavior of fluorine will put new constraints on stellar models of the other two suggested production sites: Asymptotic Giant Branch stars and Wolf-Rayet stars.
  • The inner Galactic Bulge has, until recently, been avoided in chemical evolution studies due to extreme extinction and stellar crowding. Large, near-IR spectroscopic surveys, such as APOGEE, allow for the first time the measurement of metallicities in the inner region of our Galaxy. We study metallicities of 33 K/M giants situated in the Galactic Center region from observations obtained with the APOGEE survey. We selected K/M giants with reliable stellar parameters from the APOGEE/ASPCAP pipeline. Distances, interstellar extinction values, and radial velocities were checked to confirm that these stars are indeed situated in the inner Galactic Bulge. We find a metal-rich population centered at [M/H] = +0.4 dex, in agreement with earlier studies of other bulge regions, but also a peak at low metallicity around $\rm [M/H] = -1.0\,dex$, suggesting the presence of a metal-poor population which has not previously been detected in the central region. Our results indicate a dominant metal-rich population with a metal-poor component that is enhanced in the $\alpha$-elements. This metal-poor population may be associated with the classical bulge and a fast formation scenario.
  • The Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) is a high-resolution infrared spectroscopic survey spanning all Galactic environments (i.e., bulge, disk, and halo), with the principal goal of constraining dynamical and chemical evolution models of the Milky Way. APOGEE takes advantage of the reduced effects of extinction at infrared wavelengths to observe the inner Galaxy and bulge at an unprecedented level of detail. The survey's broad spatial and wavelength coverage enables users of APOGEE data to address numerous Galactic structure and stellar populations issues. In this paper we describe the APOGEE targeting scheme and document its various target classes to provide the necessary background and reference information to analyze samples of APOGEE data with awareness of the imposed selection criteria and resulting sample properties. APOGEE's primary sample consists of ~100,000 red giant stars, selected to minimize observational biases in age and metallicity. We present the methodology and considerations that drive the selection of this sample and evaluate the accuracy, efficiency, and caveats of the selection and sampling algorithms. We also describe additional target classes that contribute to the APOGEE sample, including numerous ancillary science programs, and we outline the targeting data that will be included in the public data releases.
  • APOGEE is a large-scale, NIR, high-resolution (R~20,000) spectroscopic survey of Galactic stars. It is one of the four experiments in SDSS-III. Because APOGEE will observe in the H band, it will be the first survey to pierce through Galactic dust and provide a vast, uniform database of chemical abundances and radial velocities for stars across all Galactic populations (bulge, disk, and halo). The survey will be conducted with a dedicated, 300-fiber, cryogenic, spectrograph that is being built at the University of Virginia, coupled to the ARC 2.5m telescope at Apache Point Observatory. APOGEE will use a significant fraction of the SDSS-III bright time during a three-year period to observe, at high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N>100), about 100,000 giant stars selected directly from 2MASS down to a typical flux limit of H<13. The main scientific objectives of APOGEE are: (1) measuring unbiased metallicity distributions and abundance patterns for the different Galactic stellar populations, (2) studying the processes of star formation, feedback, and chemical mixing in the Milky Way, (3) surveying the dynamics of the bulge and disk, placing constraints on the nature and influence of the Galactic bar and spiral arms, and (4) using extensive chemodynamical data, particularly in the inner Galaxy, to unravel its formation and evolution.
  • We discuss oxygen and iron abundance patterns in K and M red-giant members of the Galactic bulge and in the young and massive M-type stars inhabiting the very center of the Milky Way. The abundance results from the different bulge studies in the literature, both in the optical and the infrared, indicate that the [O/Fe]-[Fe/H] relation in the bulge does not follow the disk relation, with [O/Fe] values falling above those of the disk. Based on these elevated values of [O/Fe] extending to large Fe abundances, it is suggested that the bulge underwent a rapid chemical enrichment with perhaps a top-heavy initial mass function. The Galactic Center stars reveal a nearly uniform and slightly elevated (relative to solar) iron abundance for a studied sample which is composed of 10 red giants and supergiants. Perhaps of more significance is the fact that the young Galactic Center M-type stars show abundance patterns that are reminiscent of those observed for the bulge population and contain enhanced abundance ratios of alpha-elements relative to either the Sun or Milky Way disk at near-solar metallicities.
  • We report on the observation of a K$_s$p resonance signal at a mass of 1765$\pm$5 MeV/c$^2$, with intrinsic width $\Gamma = 108\pm 22$ MeV/c$^2$, produced inclusively in $\Sigma^-$-nucleus interactions at 340 GeV/c in the hyperon beam experiment WA89 at CERN. The signal was observed in the kinematic region $x_F>0.7$, in this region its production cross section rises approximately linearly with $(1-x_F)$, reaching $BR(X\to K_S p)\cdot d\sigma /dx_F = (5.2\pm 2.3) \mu b $ per nucleon at $x_F=0.8$. The hard \xf spectrum suggests the presence of a strong leading particle effect in the production and hence the identification as a $\Sigma^{*+}$ state. No corresponding peaks were observed in the $K^- p$ and $\Lambda \pi^{\pm}$ mass spectra.
  • The boron abundances for two young solar-type members of the Orion association, BD -6 1250 and HD 294297, are derived from HST STIS spectra of the B I transition at 2496.771 A. The best-fit boron abundances for the target stars are 0.13 and 0.44 dex lower than the solar meteoritic value of log e(B)=2.78. An anticorrelation of boron and oxygen is found for Orion when these results are added to previous abundances obtained for 4 B-type stars and the G-type star BD -5 1317. An analysis of the uncertainties in the abundance calculations indicates that the observed anticorrelation is probably real. The B versus O relation observed in the Orion association does not follow the positive correlation of boron versus oxygen which is observed for the field stars with roughly solar metallicity. The observed anticorrelation can be accounted for by a simple model in which two poorly mixed components of gas (supernova ejecta and boron-enriched ambient medium) contribute to the new stars that form within the lifetime of the association. This model predicts an anticorrelation for Be as well, at least as strong as for boron.