• Superclusters form from the largest enhancements in the primordial density perturbation field and extend for tens of Mpc, tracing the large-scale structure of the Universe. We characterise XLSSsCN01, a rich supercluster at z~0.3 detected in the XXL Survey, composed of X-ray clusters of different virial masses and luminosities. As one of the first studies on this topic, we investigate the stellar populations of galaxies in different environments in the supercluster region. We study a magnitude-limited (r<=20) and a mass-limited sample (log(M*/M_sun)>10.8) of galaxies in the virialised region and in the outskirts of 11 XLSSsCN01 clusters, in high- and low-density field. We compute the stellar population properties of galaxies using spectral energy distribution and spectral fitting techniques, and study the dependence of star formation rates (SFR), colours, and stellar ages on environment. For r<20, the fraction of SFing/blue galaxies, computed either from the specific-SFR (sSFR) or rest-frame(rf) colour, shows depletion within the cluster virial radii, where the number of galaxies with log(sSFR/yr^-1)>-12 and with (g-r)_rf<0.6 is lower than in the field. For log(M*/M_sun)>10.8, no trends with environment emerge, as massive galaxies are mostly already passive in all environments. No differences among low- and high-density field members and cluster members emerge in the sSFR-mass relation. The luminosity-weighted age-mass relation of the passive populations within cluster virial radii show signatures of recent environmental quenching. The study of luminous and massive galaxies in this supercluster shows that while environment has a prominent role in determining the fractions of SFing/blue galaxies, its effects on the star formation activity in SFing galaxies are negligible.
  • We present very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) observations of 179 radio sources in the COSMOS field with extremely high sensitivity using the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) together with the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) (VLBA+GBT) at 1.4 GHz, to explore the faint radio population in the flux density regime of tens of $\mu$Jy. Here, the identification of active galactic nuclei (AGN) is based on the VLBI detection of the source, i.e., it is independent of X-ray or infrared properties. The milli-arcsecond resolution provided by the VLBI technique implies that the detected sources must be compact and have large brightness temperatures, and therefore they are most likely AGN (when the host galaxy is located at z$\geq$0.1). On the other hand, this technique allows us to only positively identify when a radio-active AGN is present, i.e., we cannot affirm that there is no AGN when the source is not detected. For this reason, the number of identified AGN using VLBI should be always treated as a lower limit. We present a catalogue containing the 35 radio sources detected with the VLBA+GBT, 10 of which were not previously detected using only the VLBA. We have constructed the radio source counts at 1.4 GHz using the samples of the VLBA and VLBA+GBT detected sources of the COSMOS field to determine a lower limit for the AGN contribution to the faint radio source population. We found an AGN contribution of >40-75% at flux density levels between 150 $\mu$Jy and 1 mJy. This flux density range is characterised by the upturn of the Euclidean-normalised radio source counts, which implies a contribution of a new population. This result supports the idea that the sub-mJy radio population is composed of a significant fraction of radio-emitting AGN, rather than solely by star-forming galaxies, in agreement with previous studies.
  • Using spectroscopic observations taken for the VIMOS Ultra-Deep Survey (VUDS) we report here on the discovery of PCl J1001+0220, a massive proto-cluster located at $z_{spec}\sim4.57$ in the COSMOS field. The proto-cluster was initially detected as a $\sim12\sigma$ overdensity of typical star-forming galaxies in the blind spectroscopic survey of the early universe ($2<z<6$) performed by VUDS. It was further mapped using a new technique developed that statistically combines spectroscopic and photometric redshifts, the latter derived from a recent compilation of deep multi-band imaging. Through various methods, the descendant halo mass of PCl J1001+0220 is estimated to be $\log(M_{h}/M_{\odot})_{z=0}\sim14.5-15$ with a large amount of mass apparently already in place at $z\sim4.57$. Tentative evidence is found for a fractional excess of older and more massive galaxies within the proto-cluster, an observation which suggests the pervasive early onset of vigorous star formation. No evidence is found for the differences in the star formation rates of member and a matched sample of coeval field galaxies either through rest-frame ultraviolet methods or through stacking extremely deep Very Large Array 3 GHz imaging. Additionally, no evidence for pervasive strong active galactic nuclei (AGN) activity is observed. Analysis of Hubble Space Telescope images provides weak evidence for for an elevated incidence of galaxy-galaxy interaction within the proto-cluster. The spectral properties of the two samples are compared, with a definite suppression of Ly$\alpha$ seen in the average member galaxy relative to the coeval field ($f_{esc,Ly\alpha}=1.8^{+0.3}_{-1.7}$% and $4.0^{+1.0}_{-0.8}$%, respectively). This observation along with other lines of evidence leads us to infer the possible presence of a large, cool diffuse medium within the proto-cluster environment evocative of a nascent intracluster medium.
  • We present an investigation of radio luminosity functions (LFs) and number counts based on the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array-COSMOS 3 GHz Large Project. The radio-selected sample of 7826 galaxies with robust optical/near-infrared counterparts with excellent photometric coverage allows us to construct the total radio LF since z~5.7. Using the Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm, we fit the redshift dependent pure luminosity evolution model to the data and compare it with previously published VLA-COSMOS LFs obtained on individual populations of radio-selected star-forming galaxies and galaxies hosting active galactic nuclei classified on the basis of presence or absence of a radio excess with respect to the star-formation rates derived from the infrared emission. We find they are in excellent agreement, thus showing the reliability of the radio excess method in selecting these two galaxy populations at radio wavelengths. We study radio number counts down to submicrojansky levels drawn from different models of evolving LFs. We show that our evolving LFs are able to reproduce the observed radio sky brightness, even though we rely on extrapolations toward the faint end. Our results also imply that no new radio-emitting galaxy population is present below 1 ujy. Our work suggests that selecting galaxies with radio flux densities between 0.1 and 10 ujy will yield a star-forming galaxy in 90-95 % of the cases with a high percentage of these galaxies existing around a redshift of z~2, thus providing useful constraints for planned surveys with the Square Kilometer Array and its precursors.
  • Dust-enshrouded, starbursting, submillimeter galaxies (SMGs) at $z \geq 3$ have been proposed as progenitors of $z \geq 2$ compact quiescent galaxies (cQGs). To test this connection, we present a detailed spatially resolved study of the stars, dust and stellar mass in a sample of six submillimeter-bright starburst galaxies at $z \sim 4.5$. The stellar UV emission probed by HST is extended, irregular and shows evidence of multiple components. Informed by HST, we deblend Spitzer/IRAC data at rest-frame optical finding that the systems are undergoing minor mergers, with a typical stellar mass ratio of 1:6.5. The FIR dust continuum emission traced by ALMA locates the bulk of star formation in extremely compact regions (median $r_{\rm{e}} = 0.70 \pm 0.29$ kpc) and it is in all cases associated with the most massive component of the mergers (median $\log (M_{*}/M_{\odot}) = 10.49 \pm 0.32$). We compare spatially resolved UV slope ($\beta$) maps with the FIR dust continuum to study the infrared excess ($\rm{IRX} = L_{\rm{IR}}/L_{\rm{UV}}$)-$\beta$ relation. The SMGs display systematically higher $\rm{IRX}$ values than expected from the nominal trend, demonstrating that the FIR and UV emissions are spatially disconnected. Finally, we show that the SMGs fall on the mass-size plane at smaller stellar masses and sizes than cQGs at $z = 2$. Taking into account the expected evolution in stellar mass and size between $z = 4.5$ and $z = 2$ due to the ongoing starburst and mergers with minor companions, this is in agreement with a direct evolutionary connection between the two populations.
  • We studied the molecular gas properties of AzTEC/C159, a star-forming disk galaxy at $z=4.567$. We secured $^{12}$CO molecular line detections for the $J=2\to1$ and $J=5\to4$ transitions using the Karl G. Jansky VLA and the NOEMA interferometer. The broad (FWHM$\sim750\,{\rm km\,s}^{-1}$) and tentative double-peaked profiles of both $^{12}$CO lines are consistent with an extended molecular gas reservoir, which is distributed in a rotating disk as previously revealed from [CII] 158$\mu$m line observations. Based on the $^{12}$CO(2$\to$1) emission line we derived $L'_{\rm{CO}}=(3.4\pm0.6)\times10^{10}{\rm \,K\,km\,s}^{-1}{\rm \,pc}^{2}$, that yields a molecular gas mass of $M_{\rm H_2 }(\alpha_{\rm CO}/4.3)=(1.5\pm0.3)\times 10^{11}{\rm M}_\odot$ and unveils a gas-rich system with $\mu_{\rm gas}(\alpha_{\rm CO}/4.3)\equiv M_{\rm H_2}/M_\star=3.3\pm0.7$. The extreme star formation efficiency (SFE) of AzTEC/C159, parametrized by the ratio $L_{\rm{IR}}/L'_{\rm{CO}}=(216\pm80)\, {\rm L}_{\odot}{\rm \,(K\,km\,s}^{-1}{\rm \,pc}^{2})^{-1}$, is comparable to merger-driven starbursts such as local ultra-luminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) and SMGs. Likewise, the $^{12}$CO(5$\to$4)/CO(2$\to$1) line brightness temperature ratio of $r_{52}= 0.55\pm 0.15$ is consistent with high excitation conditions, similar to that observed in SMGs. We constrained the value for the $L'_{\text{CO}}-{\rm H}_2$ mass conversion factor in AzTEC/C159, i.e. $\alpha_{\text{CO}}=3.9^{+2.7}_{-1.3}{\rm \,M}_{\odot}{\rm \,K}^{-1}{\rm \,km}^{-1}{\rm \,s\,pc}^{-2}$, that is consistent with a self-gravitating molecular gas distribution as observed in local star-forming disk galaxies. Cold gas streams from cosmological filaments might be fueling a gravitationally unstable gas-rich disk in AzTEC/C159, which breaks into giant clumps forming stars as efficiently as in merger-driven systems and generate high gas excitation.
  • Disk galaxies at intermediate redshift ($z\sim0.7$) have been found in previous work to display more optically thick behaviour than their local counterparts in the rest-frame B-band surface brightness, suggesting an evolution in dust properties over the past $\sim$6 Gyr. We compare the measured luminosities of face-on and edge-on star-forming galaxies at different wavelengths (Ultraviolet (UV), mid-infrared (MIR), far-infrared (FIR), and radio) for two well-matched samples of disk-dominated galaxies: a local Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS)-selected sample at $z\sim0.07$ and a sample of disks at $z\sim0.7$ drawn from Cosmic Evolution Survey (COSMOS). We have derived correction factors to account for the inclination dependence of the parameters used for sample selection. We find that typical galaxies are transparent at MIR wavelengths at both redshifts and that the FIR and radio emission is also transparent as expected. However, reduced sensitivity at these wavelengths limits our analysis; we cannot rule out opacity in the FIR or radio. Ultra-violet attenuation has increased between $z\sim0$ and $z\sim0.7$, with the $z\sim0.7$ sample being a factor of $\sim$3.4 more attenuated. The larger UV attenuation at $z\sim0.7$ can be explained by more clumpy dust around nascent star-forming regions. There is good agreement between the fitted evolution of the normalisation of the SFR$_{\text{UV}}$ versus 1-cos(i) trend (interpreted as the clumpiness fraction) and the molecular gas fraction/dust fraction evolution of galaxies found out to $z<1$.
  • This work is part of a series of studies focusing on the environment and the properties of the X-ray selected active galactic nuclei (AGN) population from the XXL survey. The present survey, given its large area, continuity, extensive multiwavelength coverage, and large-scale structure information, is ideal for this kind of study. Here, we focus on the XXL-South (XXL-S) field. Our main aim is to study the environment of the various types of X-ray selected AGN and investigate its possible role in AGN triggering and evolution. We studied the large-scale (>1 Mpc) environment up to redshift z=1 using the nearest neighbour distance method to compare various pairs of AGN types. We also investigated the small-scale environment (<0.4 Mpc) by calculating the local overdensities of optical galaxies. In addition, we built a catalogue of AGN concentrations with two or more members using the hierarchical clustering method and we correlated them with the X-ray galaxy clusters detected in the XXL survey. It is found that radio detected X-ray sources are more obscured than non-radio ones, though not all radio sources are obscured AGN. We did not find any significant differences in the large-scale clustering between luminous and faint X-ray AGN, or between obscured and unobscured ones, or between radio and non-radio sources. At local scales (<0.4 Mpc), AGN typically reside in overdense regions, compared to non-AGN; however, no differences were found between the various types of AGN. A majority of AGN concentrations with two or more members are found in the neighbourhood of X-ray galaxy clusters within <25-45 Mpc. Our results suggest that X-ray AGN are typically located in supercluster filaments, but they are also found in over- and underdense regions.
  • We present a sub-kpc localization of the sites of supermassive black hole (SMBH) growth in three active galactic nuclei (AGN) at $z \sim 3$ in relation to the regions of intense star formation in their hosts. These AGNs are selected from Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) and Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) observations in the HUDF and COSMOS, with the centimetric radio emission tracing both star formation and AGN, and the sub/millimeter emission by dust tracing nearly pure star formation. We require radio emission to be $\geqslant5\times$ more luminous than the level associated with the sub/millimeter star formation to ensure that the radio emission is AGN-dominated, thereby allowing localization of the AGN and star formation independently. In all three galaxies, the AGN are located within the compact regions of gas-rich, heavily obscured, intense nuclear star formation, with $R_e = 0.4-1.1$ kpc and average star formation rates of $\simeq100-1200$ $M_\odot$yr$^{-1}$. If the current episode of star formation continues at such a rate over the stellar mass doubling time of their hosts, $\simeq 0.2$ Gyr, the newly formed stellar mass will be of the order of $10^{11}$ $M_\odot$ within the central kpc region, concurrently and cospatially with significant growth of the SMBH. This is consistent with a picture of in-situ galactic bulge and SMBH formation. This work demonstrates the unique complementarity of VLA and ALMA observations to unambiguously pinpoint the locations of AGN and star formation down to $\simeq30$ mas, corresponding to $\simeq 230$ pc at $z = 3$.
  • Dark matter haloes in which galaxies reside are likely to have a significant impact on their evolution. We investigate the link between dark matter haloes and their constituent galaxies by measuring the angular two-point correlation function of radio sources, using recently released 3 GHz imaging over $\sim 2 \ \mathrm{deg}^2$ of the COSMOS field. We split the radio source population into Star Forming Galaxies (SFGs) and Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN), and further separate the AGN into radiatively efficient and inefficient accreters. Restricting our analysis to $z<1$, we find SFGs have a bias, $b = 1.5 ^{+0.1}_{-0.2}$, at a median redshift of $z=0.62$. On the other hand, AGN are significantly more strongly clustered with $b = 2.1\pm 0.2$ at a median redshift of 0.7. This supports the idea that AGN are hosted by more massive haloes than SFGs. We also find low-accretion rate AGN are more clustered ($b = 2.9 \pm 0.3$) than high-accretion rate AGN ($b = 1.8^{+0.4}_{-0.5}$) at the same redshift ($z \sim 0.7$), suggesting that low-accretion rate AGN reside in higher mass haloes. This supports previous evidence that the relatively hot gas that inhabits the most massive haloes is unable to be easily accreted by the central AGN, causing them to be inefficient. We also find evidence that low-accretion rate AGN appear to reside in halo masses of $M_{h} \sim 3-4 \times 10^{13}h^{-1}$M$_{\odot}$ at all redshifts. On the other hand, the efficient accreters reside in haloes of $M_{h} \sim 1-2 \times 10^{13}h^{-1}$M$_{\odot}$ at low redshift but can reside in relatively lower mass haloes at higher redshifts. This could be due to the increased prevalence of cold gas in lower mass haloes at $z \ge 1$ compared to $z<1$.
  • We show that the most distant X-ray detected cluster known to date, ClJ1001 at z=2.506, hosts a strong overdensity of radio sources. Six of them are individually detected (within 10") in deep 0.75" resolution VLA 3GHz imaging, with S(3GHz)>8uJy. Of the six, AGN likely affects the radio emission in two galaxies while star formation is the dominant source powering the remaining four. We searched for cluster candidates over the full COSMOS 2-square degree field using radio-detected 3GHz sources and looking for peaks in Sigma5 density maps. ClJ1001 is the strongest overdensity by far with >10sigma, with a simple z_phot>1.5 preselection. A cruder photometric rejection of z<1 radio foregrounds leaves ClJ1001 as the second strongest overdensity, while even using all radio sources ClJ1001 remains among the four strongest projected overdensities. We conclude that there are great prospects for future, deep and wide-area radio surveys to discover large samples of the first generation of forming galaxy clusters. In these remarkable structures widespread star formation and AGN activity of massive galaxy cluster members, residing within the inner cluster core, will ultimately lead to radio continuum as one of the most effective means for their identification, with detection rates expected in the ballpark of 0.1-1 per square degree at z>2.5. Samples of hundreds such high-redshift clusters could potentially constrain cosmological parameters and test cluster and galaxy formation models.
  • We study the faint radio population using wide-field very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) observations of 2865 known radio sources in the Cosmic Evolution Survey (COSMOS) field. The main objective of the project was to determine where active galactic nuclei (AGN) are present. The combination of number of sources, sensitivity, angular resolution and area covered by this project are unprecedented. We have detected 468 radio sources, expected to be AGNs, with the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) at 1.4 GHz. This is, to date, the largest sample assembled of VLBI detected sources in the sub-mJy regime. The input sample was taken from previous observations with the Very Large Array (VLA). We present the catalogue with additional multiwavelength information. We find a detection fraction of 20%, considering only those sources from the input catalogue which were in principle detectable with the VLBA (2361). As a function of redshift, we see no evolution of the detection fraction over the redshift range 0.5<z<3. In addition, we find that faint radio sources typically have a greater fraction of their radio luminosity in a compact core: ~70% of the sub-mJy sources detected with the VLBA have more than half of their total radio luminosity in a VLBI-scale component, whereas this is true for only ~30% of the sources that are brighter than 10 mJy. This suggests that fainter radio sources differ intrinsically from brighter ones. Across our entire sample, we find the predominant morphological classification of the host galaxies of the VLBA detected sources to be early type (57%), although this varies with redshift and at z>1.5 we find that spiral galaxies become the most prevalent (48%). We demonstrate that wide-field VLBI observations, together with new calibration methods such as multi-source self-calibration and mosaicing, result in information which is difficult or impossible to obtain otherwise.
  • Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) are energetic astrophysical sources powered by accretion onto supermassive black holes in galaxies, and present unique observational signatures that cover the full electromagnetic spectrum over more than twenty orders of magnitude in frequency. The rich phenomenology of AGN has resulted in a large number of different "flavours" in the literature that now comprise a complex and confusing AGN "zoo". It is increasingly clear that these classifications are only partially related to intrinsic differences between AGN, and primarily reflect variations in a relatively small number of astrophysical parameters as well the method by which each class of AGN is selected. Taken together, observations in different electromagnetic bands as well as variations over time provide complementary windows on the physics of different sub-structures in the AGN. In this review, we present an overview of AGN multi-wavelength properties with the aim of painting their "big picture" through observations in each electromagnetic band from radio to gamma-rays as well as AGN variability. We address what we can learn from each observational method, the impact of selection effects, the physics behind the emission at each wavelength, and the potential for future studies. To conclude we use these observations to piece together the basic architecture of AGN, discuss our current understanding of unification models, and highlight some open questions that present opportunities for future observational and theoretical progress.
  • The XXL survey currently covers two 25 sq. deg. patches with XMM observations of ~10ks. We summarise the scientific results associated with the first release of the XXL data set, that occurred mid 2016. We review several arguments for increasing the survey depth to 40 ks during the next decade of XMM operations. X-ray (z<2) cluster, (z<4) AGN and cosmic background survey science will then benefit from an extraordinary data reservoir. This, combined with deep multi-$\lambda$ observations, will lead to solid standalone cosmological constraints and provide a wealth of information on the formation and evolution of AGN, clusters and the X-ray background. In particular, it will offer a unique opportunity to pinpoint the z>1 cluster density. It will eventually constitute a reference study and an ideal calibration field for the upcoming eROSITA and Euclid missions.
  • Based on a sample of over 1,800 radio AGN at redshifts out to z~5, which have typical stellar masses within ~3x(10^{10}-10^{11}) Msol, and 3 GHz radio data in the COSMOS field, we derived the 1.4 GHz radio luminosity functions for radio AGN (L_1.4GHz ~ 10^{22}-10^{27} W/Hz) out to z~5. We constrained the evolution of this population via continuous models of pure density and pure luminosity evolutions, and we found best-fit parametrizations of Phi*~(1+z)^{(2.00+/-0.18)-(0.60+/-0.14)z}, and L*~(1+z)^{(2.88+/-0.82)-(0.84+/-0.34)z}, respectively, with a turnover in number and luminosity densities of the population at z~1.5. We converted 1.4 GHz luminosity to kinetic luminosity taking uncertainties of the scaling relation used into account. We thereby derived the cosmic evolution of the kinetic luminosity density provided by the AGN and compared this luminosity density to the radio-mode AGN feedback assumed in the Semi-Analytic Galaxy Evolution (SAGE) model, i.e., to the redshift evolution of the central supermassive black hole accretion luminosity taken in the model as the source of heating that offsets the energy losses of the cooling, hot halo gas, and thereby limits further stellar mass growth of massive galaxies. We find that the kinetic luminosity exerted by our radio AGN may be high enough to balance the radiative cooling of the hot gas at each cosmic epoch since z~5. However, although our findings support the idea of radio-mode AGN feedback as a cosmologically relevant process in massive galaxy formation, many simplifications in both the observational and semi-analytic approaches still remain and need to be resolved before robust conclusions can be reached.
  • We examine the behaviour of the infrared-radio correlation (IRRC) over the range $0<z<6$ using new, highly sensitive 3GHz observations with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) and infrared data from the Herschel Space Observatory in the 2deg$^{2}$ COSMOS field. We distinguish between objects where emission is believed to arise solely from star-formation, and those where an active galactic nucleus (AGN) is thought to be present. We account for non-detections in the radio or in the infrared using a doubly-censored survival analysis. We find that the IRRC of star-forming galaxies, quantified by the infrared-to-1.4GHz radio luminosity ratio ($q_{\rm TIR}$), decreases with increasing redshift: $q_{\rm TIR}(z)=(2.88\pm0.03)(1+z)^{-0.19\pm0.01}$. Moderate-to-high radiative luminosity AGN do not follow the same $q_{\rm TIR}$$(z)$ trend, having a lower normalisation and steeper decrease with redshift. We cannot rule out the possibility that unidentified AGN contributions only to the radio regime may be steepening the observed $q_{\rm TIR}(z)$ trend of the star-forming population. An increasing fractional contribution to the observed 3GHz flux by free-free emission of star-forming galaxies may also affect the derived evolution. However, we find that the standard (M82-based) assumption of the typical radio spectral energy distribution (SED) for star-forming galaxies is inconsistent with our results. This suggests a more complex shape of the typical radio SED for star-forming galaxies, and that imperfect $K$ corrections in the radio may govern the derived redshift trend of $q_{\rm TIR}$. Lastly, we present a redshift-dependent relation between rest-frame 1.4GHz radio luminosity and star formation rate taking the derived redshift trend into account.
  • (abridged) We study the composition of the faint radio population selected from the VLA-COSMOS 3GHz Large Project. The survey covers a 2.6sq.deg. area with a mean rms of ~2.3uJy/b, cataloging 10830 sources (>5sigma). Combining these radio data with optical, near-infrared (UltraVISTA), mid-infrared (Spitzer/IRAC) data, and X-ray data (Chandra), we find counterparts to radio sources for ~93% of the radio sample (in the areas of the COSMOS field not affected by saturated or bright sources in the optical to NIR bands), reaching out to z<6. We further classify the sources as star forming galaxies or AGN based on various criteria, such as X-ray luminosity, observed MIR color, UV-FIR spectral-energy distribution, rest-frame NUV-optical color corrected for dust extinction, and radio-excess relative to that expected from the hosts' star-formation rate. We separate the AGN into sub-samples dominated by low-to-moderate and moderate-to-high radiative luminosity AGN, candidates for high-redshift analogues to local low- and high-excitation emission line AGN, respectively. We study the fractional contributions of these sub-populations down to radio flux levels of ~11uJy at 3GHz (or ~20uJy at 1.4GHz assuming a spectral index of -0.7). We find that the dominant fraction at 1.4GHz flux densities above ~200uJy is constituted of low-to-moderate radiative luminosity AGN. Below densities of ~100uJy the fraction of star-forming galaxies increases to ~60%, followed by the moderate-to-high radiative luminosity AGN (~20%), and low-to-moderate radiative luminosity AGN (~20%). Based on this observational evidence, we extrapolate the fractions down to sensitivities of the SKA. Our estimates suggest that at the faint flux limits to be reached by the SKA1 surveys, a selection based only on radio flux limits can provide a simple tool to efficiently identify samples highly (>75%) dominated by star-forming galaxies.
  • We explore the multiwavelength properties of AGN host galaxies for different classes of radio-selected AGN out to z$\lesssim$6 via a multiwavelength analysis of about 7700 radio sources in the COSMOS field. The sources were selected with the Very Large Array (VLA) at 3 GHz (10 cm) within the VLA-COSMOS 3 GHz Large Project, and cross-matched with multiwavelength ancillary data. This is the largest sample of high-redshift (z$\lesssim$6) radio sources with exquisite photometric coverage and redshift measurements available. We constructed a sample of moderate-to-high radiative luminosity AGN (HLAGN) via spectral energy distribution (SED) decomposition combined with standard X-ray and mid-infrared diagnostics. Within the remainder of the sample we further identified low-to-moderate radiative luminosity AGN (MLAGN) via excess in radio emission relative to the star formation rates in their host galaxies. We show that AGN power in HLAGN occurs predominantly in radiative form, while MLAGN display a substantial mechanical AGN luminosity component. We found significant differences in the host properties of the two AGN classes, as a function of redshift. At z$<$1.5, MLAGN appear to reside in significantly more massive and less star-forming galaxies compared to HLAGN. At z$>$1.5, we observed a reversal in the behaviour of the stellar mass distributions with the HLAGN populating the higher stellar mass tail. We interpret this finding as a possible hint of the downsizing of galaxies hosting HLAGN, with the most massive galaxies triggering AGN activity earlier than less massive galaxies, and then fading to MLAGN at lower redshifts. Our conclusion is that HLAGN and MLAGN samples trace two distinct galaxy and AGN populations in a wide range of redshifts, possibly resembling the radio AGN types often referred to as radiative- and jet-mode (or high- and low-excitation), respectively.
  • We make use of the deep Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) COSMOS radio observations at 3 GHz to infer radio luminosity functions of star-forming galaxies up to redshifts of z~5 based on approximately 6000 detections with reliable optical counterparts. This is currently the largest radio-selected sample available out to z~5 across an area of 2 square degrees with a sensitivity of rms=2.3 ujy/beam. By fixing the faint and bright end shape of the radio luminosity function to the local values, we find a strong redshift trend that can be fitted with a pure luminosity evolution L~(1+z)^{(3.16 +- 0.2)-(0.32 +- 0.07) z}. We estimate star formation rates (SFRs) from our radio luminosities using an infrared (IR)-radio correlation that is redshift dependent. By integrating the parametric fits of the evolved luminosity function we calculate the cosmic SFR density (SFRD) history since z~5. Our data suggest that the SFRD history peaks between 2<z<3 and that the ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs; 100 Msol/yr<SFR<1000 Msol/yr) contribute up to ~25% to the total SFRD in the same redshift range. Hyperluminous infrared galaxies (HyLIRGs; SFR>1000 Msol/yr) contribute an additional <2% in the entire observed redshift range. We find evidence of a potential underestimation of SFRD based on ultraviolet (UV) rest-frame observations of Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) at high redshifts (z>4) on the order of 15-20%, owing to appreciable star formation in highly dust-obscured galaxies, which might remain undetected in such UV observations.
  • We present the VLA-COSMOS 3 GHz Large Project based on 384 hours of observations with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) at 3 GHz (10 cm) toward the two square degree Cosmic Evolution Survey (COSMOS) field. The final mosaic reaches a median rms of 2.3 uJy/beam over the two square degrees at an angular resolution of 0.75". To fully account for the spectral shape and resolution variations across the broad (2 GHz) band, we image all data with a multiscale, multifrequency synthesis algorithm. We present a catalog of 10,830 radio sources down to 5 sigma, out of which 67 are combined from multiple components. Comparing the positions of our 3 GHz sources with those from the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA)-COSMOS survey, we estimate that the astrometry is accurate to 0.01" at the bright end (signal-to-noise ratio, S/N_3GHz > 20). Survival analysis on our data combined with the VLA-COSMOS 1.4~GHz Joint Project catalog yields an expected median radio spectral index of alpha=-0.7. We compute completeness corrections via Monte Carlo simulations to derive the corrected 3 GHz source counts. Our counts are in agreement with previously derived 3 GHz counts based on single-pointing (0.087 square degrees) VLA data. In summary, the VLA-COSMOS 3 GHz Large Project simultaneously provides the largest and deepest radio continuum survey at high (0.75") angular resolution to date, bridging the gap between last-generation and next-generation surveys.
  • The observed evolution of the gas fraction and its associated depletion time in main sequence (MS) galaxies provides insights on how star formation proceeds over cosmic time. We report ALMA detections of the rest-frame $\sim$300$\mu$m continuum observed at 240 GHz for 45 massive ($\rm \langle log(M_{\star}(M_{\odot}))\rangle=10.7$), normal star forming ($\rm \langle log(sSFR(yr^{-1}))\rangle=-8.6$), i.e. MS, galaxies at $\rm z\approx3.2$ in the COSMOS field. From an empirical calibration between cold neutral, i.e. molecular and atomic, gas mass $\rm M_{gas}$ and monochromatic (rest-frame) infrared luminosity, the gas mass for this sample is derived. Combined with stellar mass $\rm M_{\star}$ and star formation rate (SFR) estimates (from {\sc MagPhys} fits) we obtain a median gas fraction of $\rm \mu_{gas}=M_{gas}/M_{\star}=1.65_{-0.19}^{+0.18}$ and a median gas depletion time $\rm t_{depl.}(Gyr)=M_{gas}/SFR=0.68_{-0.08}^{+0.07}$; correction for the location on the MS will only slightly change the values. The reported uncertainties are the $\rm 1\sigma$ error on the median. Our results are fully consistent with the expected flattening of the redshift evolution from the 2-SFM (2 star formation mode) framework that empirically prescribes the evolution assuming a universal, log-linear relation between SFR and gas mass coupled to the redshift evolution of the specific star formation rate (sSFR) of main sequence galaxies. While $\rm t_{dep.}$ shows only a mild dependence on location within the MS, a clear trend of increasing $\rm \mu_{gas}$ across the MS is observed (as known from previous studies). Further we comment on trends within the MS and (in)consistencies with other studies.
  • We present observations with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) at 3 GHz toward a sub-field of the XXL-North 25 deg$^{2}$ field targeting the first supercluster discovered in the XXL Survey. The structure has been found at a spectroscopic redshift of 0.43 and extending over $0.35\times0.1$ deg$^{2}$ on the sky. We present the 3 GHz VLA radio continuum observations, the radio mosaic and radio source catalogue, and, perform an analysis of the supercluster in the optical and radio regimes using photometric redshifts from the CFHTLS survey and our new VLA data. Our 3 GHz radio mosaic has a resolution of $3.2\times1.9$ arcsec$^2$, and covers an area of $41\times41$ arcmin$^2$ with rms noise level below $\sim20 \mu$Jy beam$^{-1}$ ($\sim11\mu$Jy beam$^{-1}$ in central $15\times15$ arcmin$^2$). We extract a catalogue of 155 radio sources $\geq6\sigma$, 8 of which are multicomponent sources, and 123 ($79\%$) can be associated with optical sources in the CFHTLS W1 catalogue. Applying Voronoi tessellation analysis (VTA) in the area around the X-ray identified supercluster we identify a total of 17 overdensities at $z=0.35-0.50$, 7 of which are associated with clusters detected in the $XMM-Newton$ XXL data. We find a mean photometric redshift of 0.43 for our overdensities, consistent with the spectroscopic redshifts of 7 X-ray detected clusters. The full VTA-identified structure extends over $\sim0.6\times0.2$ deg$^2$ on the sky, ($\sim12\times4$ Mpc$^{2}$ at $z=0.43$). We associate 8 radio sources with potential group/cluster member galaxies none of which are large radio galaxies. The spatial distribution of the red and blue potential group member galaxies suggests that the clusters are dynamically young and not virialised yet, as expected for hierarchical structure growth in a $\Lambda$CDM universe. Further spectroscopic data are required to analyze the dynamical state of the groups.
  • We present the COSMOS2015 catalog which contains precise photometric redshifts and stellar masses for more than half a million objects over the 2deg$^{2}$ COSMOS field. Including new $YJHK_{\rm s}$ images from the UltraVISTA-DR2 survey, $Y$-band from Subaru/Hyper-Suprime-Cam and infrared data from the Spitzer Large Area Survey with the Hyper-Suprime-Cam Spitzer legacy program, this near-infrared-selected catalog is highly optimized for the study of galaxy evolution and environments in the early Universe. To maximise catalog completeness for bluer objects and at higher redshifts, objects have been detected on a $\chi^{2}$ sum of the $YJHK_{\rm s}$ and $z^{++}$ images. The catalog contains $\sim 6\times 10^5$ objects in the 1.5 deg$^{2}$ UltraVISTA-DR2 region, and $\sim 1.5\times 10^5$ objects are detected in the "ultra-deep stripes" (0.62 deg$^{2}$) at $K_{\rm s}\leq 24.7$ (3$\sigma$, 3", AB magnitude). Through a comparison with the zCOSMOS-bright spectroscopic redshifts, we measure a photometric redshift precision of $\sigma_{\Delta z/(1+z_s)}$ = 0.007 and a catastrophic failure fraction of $\eta=0.5$%. At $3<z<6$, using the unique database of spectroscopic redshifts in COSMOS, we find $\sigma_{\Delta z/(1+z_s)}$ = 0.021 and $\eta=13.2\% $. The deepest regions reach a 90\% completeness limit of 10$^{10}M_\odot$ to $z=4$. Detailed comparisons of the color distributions, number counts, and clustering show excellent agreement with the literature in the same mass ranges. COSMOS2015 represents a unique, publicly available, valuable resource with which to investigate the evolution of galaxies within their environment back to the earliest stages of the history of the Universe. The COSMOS2015 catalog is distributed via anonymous ftp (ftp://ftp.iap.fr/pub/from_users/hjmcc/COSMOS2015/) and through the usual astronomical archive systems (CDS, ESO Phase 3, IRSA).
  • We study the environment of 23 submillimetre galaxies (SMGs) drawn from the JCMT/AzTEC 1.1mm S/N-limited sample in the COSMOS field, as well as 4 COSMOS SMGs at z_spec>4.5, and 1 at z_spec=2.49, yielding a sample of 28 SMGs. We search for overdensities using the COSMOS photometric redshifts based on over 30 UV-NIR photometric bands, reaching an accuracy of sigma(Delta z/(1+z))=0.0067 (0.0155) at z<3.5 (>3.5). To identify overdensities we apply the Voronoi tessellation analysis, and estimate the overdensity estimator delta_g as a function of distance from the SMG and/or overdensity center. We test and validate our approach via simulations, X-ray detected groups, and spectroscopic verifications using VUDS and zCOSMOS catalogues showing that even with photometric redshifts in COSMOS we can efficiently retrieve overdensities out to z~5. Our results yield that 11/23 (48%) JCMT/AzTEC 1.1mm SMGs occupy overdense environments. Considering the entire JCMT/AzTEC 1.1mm S/N>4 sample, and accounting for the expected fraction of spurious detections, yields that 35-61% of the SMGs in the S/N-limited sample occupy overdense environments. We perform an X-ray stacking analysis in the 0.5-2keV band using a 32" aperture and our SMG positions, and find statistically significant detections. For our z<2 [z>2] subsample we find an average flux of (4.0+/-0.8)x10^{-16} [(1.3+/-0.5)x10^{-16}] erg/s/cm^2 and a corresponding total mass of M_200 = 2.8x10^{13} [2x10^{13}] MSol. Our results suggest a higher occurrence of SMGs occupying overdense environments at z>3, than at z<3. This may be understood if highly star forming galaxies can only be formed in the highest peaks of the density field tracing the most massive dark matter haloes at early cosmic epochs, while at later times cosmic structure may have matured sufficiently that more modest overdensities correspond to sufficiently massive haloes to form SMGs.
  • We study the composition of the faint radio population selected from the VLA-COSMOS 3GHz Large Project, a radio continuum survey performed at 10 cm wavelength. The survey covers the full 2 square degree COSMOS field with mean $rms\sim2.3$ $\mu$Jy/beam, cataloging 10,899 source components above $5\times rms$. By combining these radio data with UltraVISTA, optical, near-infrared, and Spitzer/IRAC mid-infrared data, as well as X-ray data from the Chandra Legacy, and Chandra COSMOS surveys, we gain insight into the emission mechanisms within our radio sources out to redshifts of $z\sim5$. From these emission characteristics we classify our souces as star forming galaxies or AGN. Using their multi-wavelength properties we further separate the AGN into sub-samples dominated by radiatively efficient and inefficient AGN, often referred to as high- and low-excitation emission line AGN. We compare our method with other results based on fitting of the sources' spectral energy distributions using both galaxy and AGN spectral models, and those based on the infrared-radio correlation. We study the fractional contributions of these sub-populations down to radio flux levels of $\sim$10 $\mu$Jy. We find that at 3 GHz flux densities above $\sim$400 $\mu$Jy quiescent, red galaxies, consistent with the low-excitation radio AGN class constitute the dominant fraction. Below densities of $\sim$200 $\mu$Jy star-forming galaxies begin to constitute the largest fraction, followed by the low-excitation, and X-ray- and IR-identified high-excitation radio AGN.