• A. De Angelis, V. Tatischeff, I. A. Grenier, J. McEnery, M. Mallamaci, M. Tavani, U. Oberlack, L. Hanlon, R. Walter, A. Argan, P. Von Ballmoos, A. Bulgarelli, A. Bykov, M. Hernanz, G. Kanbach, I. Kuvvetli, M. Pearce, A. Zdziarski, J. Conrad, G. Ghisellini, A. Harding, J. Isern, M. Leising, F. Longo, G. Madejski, M. Martinez, M. N. Mazziotta, J. M. Paredes, M. Pohl, R. Rando, M. Razzano, A. Aboudan, M. Ackermann, A. Addazi, M. Ajello, C. Albertus, J. M. Alvarez, G. Ambrosi, S. Anton, L. A. Antonelli, A. Babic, B. Baibussinov, M. Balbo, L. Baldini, S. Balman, C. Bambi, U. Barres de Almeida, J. A. Barrio, R. Bartels, D. Bastieri, W. Bednarek, D. Bernard, E. Bernardini, T. Bernasconi, B. Bertucci, A. Biland, E. Bissaldi, M. Boettcher, V. Bonvicini, V. Bosch Ramon, E. Bottacini, V. Bozhilov, T. Bretz, M. Branchesi, V. Brdar, T. Bringmann, A. Brogna, C. Budtz Jorgensen, G. Busetto, S. Buson, M. Busso, A. Caccianiga, S. Camera, R. Campana, P. Caraveo, M. Cardillo, P. Carlson, S. Celestin, M. Cermeno, A. Chen, C. C Cheung, E. Churazov, S. Ciprini, A. Coc, S. Colafrancesco, A. Coleiro, W. Collmar, P. Coppi, R. Curado da Silva, S. Cutini, F. DAmmando, B. De Lotto, D. de Martino, A. De Rosa, M. Del Santo, L. Delgado, R. Diehl, S. Dietrich, A. D. Dolgov, A. Dominguez, D. Dominis Prester, I. Donnarumma, D. Dorner, M. Doro, M. Dutra, D. Elsaesser, M. Fabrizio, A. FernandezBarral, V. Fioretti, L. Foffano, V. Formato, N. Fornengo, L. Foschini, A. Franceschini, A. Franckowiak, S. Funk, F. Fuschino, D. Gaggero, G. Galanti, F. Gargano, D. Gasparrini, R. Gehrz, P. Giammaria, N. Giglietto, P. Giommi, F. Giordano, M. Giroletti, G. Ghirlanda, N. Godinovic, C. Gouiffes, J. E. Grove, C. Hamadache, D. H. Hartmann, M. Hayashida, A. Hryczuk, P. Jean, T. Johnson, J. Jose, S. Kaufmann, B. Khelifi, J. Kiener, J. Knodlseder, M. Kole, J. Kopp, V. Kozhuharov, C. Labanti, S. Lalkovski, P. Laurent, O. Limousin, M. Linares, E. Lindfors, M. Lindner, J. Liu, S. Lombardi, F. Loparco, R. LopezCoto, M. Lopez Moya, B. Lott, P. Lubrano, D. Malyshev, N. Mankuzhiyil, K. Mannheim, M. J. Marcha, A. Marciano, B. Marcote, M. Mariotti, M. Marisaldi, S. McBreen, S. Mereghetti, A. Merle, R. Mignani, G. Minervini, A. Moiseev, A. Morselli, F. Moura, K. Nakazawa, L. Nava, D. Nieto, M. Orienti, M. Orio, E. Orlando, P. Orleanski, S. Paiano, R. Paoletti, A. Papitto, M. Pasquato, B. Patricelli, M. A. PerezGarcia, M. Persic, G. Piano, A. Pichel, M. Pimenta, C. Pittori, T. Porter, J. Poutanen, E. Prandini, N. Prantzos, N. Produit, S. Profumo, F. S. Queiroz, S. Raino, A. Raklev, M. Regis, I. Reichardt, Y. Rephaeli, J. Rico, W. Rodejohann, G. Rodriguez Fernandez, M. Roncadelli, L. Roso, A. Rovero, R. Ruffini, G. Sala, M. A. SanchezConde, A. Santangelo, P. Saz Parkinson, T. Sbarrato, A. Shearer, R. Shellard, K. Short, T. Siegert, C. Siqueira, P. Spinelli, A. Stamerra, S. Starrfield, A. Strong, I. Strumke, F. Tavecchio, R. Taverna, T. Terzic, D. J. Thompson, O. Tibolla, D. F. Torres, R. Turolla, A. Ulyanov, A. Ursi, A. Vacchi, J. Van den Abeele, G. Vankova Kirilovai, C. Venter, F. Verrecchia, P. Vincent, X. Wang, C. Weniger, X. Wu, G. Zaharijas, L. Zampieri, S. Zane, S. Zimmer, A. Zoglauer, the eASTROGAM collaboration
    e-ASTROGAM (enhanced ASTROGAM) is a breakthrough Observatory space mission, with a detector composed by a Silicon tracker, a calorimeter, and an anticoincidence system, dedicated to the study of the non-thermal Universe in the photon energy range from 0.3 MeV to 3 GeV - the lower energy limit can be pushed to energies as low as 150 keV for the tracker, and to 30 keV for calorimetric detection. The mission is based on an advanced space-proven detector technology, with unprecedented sensitivity, angular and energy resolution, combined with polarimetric capability. Thanks to its performance in the MeV-GeV domain, substantially improving its predecessors, e-ASTROGAM will open a new window on the non-thermal Universe, making pioneering observations of the most powerful Galactic and extragalactic sources, elucidating the nature of their relativistic outflows and their effects on the surroundings. With a line sensitivity in the MeV energy range one to two orders of magnitude better than previous generation instruments, e-ASTROGAM will determine the origin of key isotopes fundamental for the understanding of supernova explosion and the chemical evolution of our Galaxy. The mission will provide unique data of significant interest to a broad astronomical community, complementary to powerful observatories such as LIGO-Virgo-GEO600-KAGRA, SKA, ALMA, E-ELT, TMT, LSST, JWST, Athena, CTA, IceCube, KM3NeT, and LISA.
  • The e-ASTROGAM is a gamma-ray space mission to be proposed as the M5 Medium-size mission of the European Space Agency. It is dedicated to the observation of the Universe with unprecedented sensitivity in the energy range 0.2 - 100 MeV, extending up to GeV energies, together with a groundbreaking polarization capability. It is designed to substantially improve the COMPTEL and Fermi sensitivities in the MeV-GeV energy range and to open new windows of opportunity for astrophysical and fundamental physics space research. e-ASTROGAM will operate as an open astronomical observatory, with a core science focused on (1) the activity from extreme particle accelerators, including gamma-ray bursts and active galactic nuclei and the link of jet astrophysics to the new astronomy of gravitational waves, neutrinos, ultra-high energy cosmic rays, (2) the high-energy mysteries of the Galactic center and inner Galaxy, including the activity of the supermassive black hole, the Fermi Bubbles, the origin of the Galactic positrons, and the search for dark matter signatures in a new energy window; (3) nucleosynthesis and chemical evolution, including the life cycle of elements produced by supernovae in the Milky Way and the Local Group of galaxies. e-ASTROGAM will be ideal for the study of high-energy sources in general, including pulsars and pulsar wind nebulae, accreting neutron stars and black holes, novae, supernova remnants, and magnetars. And it will also provide important contributions to solar and terrestrial physics. The e-ASTROGAM telescope is optimized for the simultaneous detection of Compton and pair-producing gamma-ray events over a large spectral band. It is based on a very high technology readiness level for all subsystems and includes many innovative features for the detectors and associated electronics.
  • Intense and purified radioactive beam of post-accelerated $^{14}$O was used to study the low-lying states in the unbound $^{15}$F nucleus. Exploiting resonant elastic scattering in inverse kinematics with a thick target, the second excited state, a resonance at E$\_R$=4.757(6)(10)~MeV with a width of $\Gamma$=36(5)(14)~keV was measured for the first time with high precision. The structure of this narrow above-barrier state in a nucleus located two neutrons beyond the proton drip line was investigated using the Gamow Shell Model in the coupled channel representation with a $^{12}$C core and three valence protons. It is found that it is an almost pure wave function of two quasi-bound protons in the $2s\_{1/2}$ shell.
  • The response of a scintillation detector with a cylindrical 1.5-inch LaBr3:Ce crystal to incident neutrons has been measured in the energy range En = 2-12 MeV. Neutrons were produced by proton irradiation of a Li target at Ep = 5-14.6 MeV with pulsed proton beams. Using the time-of-flight information between target and detector, energy spectra of the LaBr3:Ce detector resulting from fast neutron interactions have been obtained at 4 different neutron energies. Neutron-induced gamma rays emitted by the LaBr3:Ce crystal were also measured in a nearby Ge detector at the lowest proton beam energy. In addition, we obtained data for neutron irradiation of a large-volume high-purity Ge detector and of a NE-213 liquid scintillator detector, both serving as monitor detectors in the experiment. Monte-Carlo type simulations for neutron interactions in the liquid scintillator, the Ge and LaBr3:Ce crystals have been performed and compared with measured data. Good agreement being obtained with the data, we present the results of simulations to predict the response of LaBr3:Ce detectors for a range of crystal sizes to neutron irradiation in the energy range En = 0.5-10 MeV
  • The deepest XMM-Newton mosaic map of the central 1.5 deg of the Galaxy is presented, including a total of about 1.5 Ms of EPIC-pn cleaned exposures in the central 15" and about 200 ks outside. This compendium presents broad-band X-ray continuum maps, soft X-ray intensity maps, a decomposition into spectral components and a comparison of the X-ray maps with emission at other wavelengths. Newly-discovered extended features, such as supernova remnants (SNRs), superbubbles and X-ray filaments are reported. We provide an atlas of extended features within +-1 degree of Sgr A*. We discover the presence of a coherent X-ray emitting region peaking around G0.1-0.1 and surrounded by the ring of cold, mid-IR-emitting material known from previous work as the "Radio Arc Bubble" and with the addition of the X-ray data now appears to be a candidate superbubble. Sgr A's bipolar lobes show sharp edges, suggesting that they could be the remnant, collimated by the circumnuclear disc, of a SN explosion that created the recently discovered magnetar, SGR J1745-2900. Soft X-ray features, most probably from SNRs, are observed to fill holes in the dust distribution, and to indicate a direct interaction between SN explosions and Galactic center (GC) molecular clouds. We also discover warm plasma at high Galactic latitude, showing a sharp edge to its distribution that correlates with the location of known radio/mid-IR features such as the "GC Lobe". These features might be associated with an inhomogeneous hot "atmosphere" over the GC, perhaps fed by continuous or episodic outflows of mass and energy from the GC region.
  • Gamma-ray excitation functions have been measured for 30, 42, 54 and 66 MeV proton beams accelerated onto C + O (Mylar), Mg, Si, and Fe targets of astrophysical interest at the separate-sector cyclotron of iThemba LABS in Somerset West (Cape Town, South Africa). A large solid angle, high energy resolution detection system of the Eurogam type was used to record Gamma-ray energy spectra. Derived preliminary results of Gamma-ray line production cross sections for the Mg, Si and Fe target nuclei are reported and discussed. The current cross section data for known, intense Gamma-ray lines from these nuclei consistently extend to higher proton energies previous experimental data measured up to Ep ~ 25 MeV at the Orsay and Washington tandem accelerators. Data for new Gamma-ray lines observed for the first time in this work are also reported.
  • We study a possible connection between processes of gamma-ray emission and hydrogen ionization in a few pc of central region around Sgr A*. Previous investigations showed there is a discrepancy between interpretation of gamma-ray and ionization data if gamma-rays are generated by proton-proton collisions. Here we provided analysis of processes of ionization and emission basing on analytical and numerical calculations of kinetic equations which describe processes of particle propagation and their energy losses. The origin of gamma rays could be either due to collisions of relativistic protons with the dense gas of the surrounding circumnuclear disk (CND) or bremsstrahlung and inverse Compton scattering of relativistic electrons. The hydrogen ionization in this case is produced by a low energy component of the CR spectrum. We found that if ionization is produced by protons the expected ionization rate of hydrogen in the CND is of the same order as derived from IR observations. So we do not see any discrepancy between the gamma-ray and ionization data for the hadronic model. In the case of ionization by electrons we obtained the ionization rate one order of magnitude higher than follows from the IR data. In principle, a selection between the leptonic and hadronic interpretations can be performed basing on measurements of radio and X-ray fluxes from this region because the leptonic and hadronic models give different values of the fluxes from there. We do not exclude that gamma-ray production and hydrogen ionization in the CND are due to a past activity of Sgr A* which occurred about 100 year ago. Then we hypothesize that there may be connection between a past proton eruption and a flux of hard X-rays emitted by Sgr A* hundred years ago as follows from the observed time variability of the iron line seen in the direction of GC molecular clouds.
  • In this work the efficiency of particle acceleration at the forward shock right after the SN outburst for the particular case of the well-known SN 1993J is analyzed. Plasma instabilities driven by the energetic particles accelerated at the shock front grow over intraday timescales and drive a fast amplification of the magnetic field at the shock, that can explain the magnetic field strengths deduced from the radio monitoring of the source. The maximum particle energy is found to reach 1-10 PeV depending on the instability dominating the amplification process. We derive the time dependent particle spectra and the associated hadronic signatures of secondary particles arising from proton proton interactions. We find that the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) should easily detect objects like SN 1993J in particular above 1 TeV, while current generation of Cherenkov telescopes such as H.E.S.S. could only marginally detect such events. The gamma-ray signal is found to be heavily absorbed by pair production process during the first week after the outburst. We predict a low neutrino flux above 10 TeV, implying a detectability horizon with a KM3NeT-type telescope of 1 Mpc only. We finally discuss the essential parameters that control the particle acceleration and gamma-ray emission in other type of SNe.
  • Radioactive beams of $^{14}$O and $^{15}$O were used to populate the resonant states 1/2$^+$, 5/2$^+$ and $0^-,1^-,2^-$ in the unbound $^{15}$F and $^{16}$F nuclei respectively by means of proton elastic scattering reactions in inverse kinematics. Based on their large proton spectroscopic factor values, the resonant states in $^{16}$F can be viewed as a core of $^{14}$O plus a proton in the 2s$_{1/2}$ or 1d$_{5/2}$ shell and a neutron in 1p$_{1/2}$. Experimental energies were used to derive the strength of the 2s$_{1/2}$-1p$_{1/2}$ and 1d$_{5/2}$-1p$_{1/2}$ proton-neutron interactions. It is found that the former changes by 40% compared with the mirror nucleus $^{16}$N, and the second by 10%. This apparent symmetry breaking of the nuclear force between mirror nuclei finds explanation in the role of the large coupling to the continuum for the states built on an $\ell=0$ proton configuration.
  • The observed primordial 7Li abundance in metal-poor halo stars is found to be lower than its Big-Bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) calculated value by a factor of approximately three. Some recent works suggested the possibility that this discrepancy originates from missing resonant reactions which would destroy the 7Be, parent of 7Li. The most promising candidate resonances which were found include a possibly missed 1- or 2- narrow state around 15 MeV in the compound nucleus 10C formed by 7Be+3He and a state close to 7.8 MeV in the compound nucleus 11C formed by 7Be+4He. In this work, we studied the high excitation energy region of 10C and the low excitation energy region in 11C via the reactions 10B(3He,t)10C and 11B(3He,t)11C, respectively, at the incident energy of 35 MeV. Our results for 10C do not support 7Be+3He as a possible solution for the 7Li problem. Concerning 11C results, the data show no new resonances in the excitation energy region of interest and this excludes 7Be+4He reaction channel as an explanation for the 7Li deficit.
  • The study of both supernova remnants and the hot and cold phases of the interstellar medium are essential for understanding the final stages of stellar evolution and their feedback on the evolution of galaxies through injection of energy and heavy elements. These studies are also crucial for understanding the physics of supernovae, their cosmological implication, and the origin of galactic cosmic rays. The unique capabilities of Athena+ will allow us to explore a new parameter space. Spatially-resolved high-resolution spectroscopy using Athena+ X-IFU of young remnants will allow to characterize individual parcels of ejected material in the line of sight in terms of kinematics, ionization and composition, providing access to the three dimensional geometry of the explosion. Athena+ will also allow studying shock physics and particle acceleration in supernova remnants, as well as their interaction with their environment. Athena+ X-IFU will also characterize the ionization mechanisms competing in forming the complex structures of the hot interstellar medium, likely to keep the echo of past star formation activity, both in our Galaxy and nearby ones. For the first time the dust and gas of the densest cold medium, like in the Galactic Centre environment, will be studied. Athena+ X-IFU will observe, along with the Mg K and Si K edges, which are the main tracers of the silicates content of the ISM, the Fe K edge with unprecedented sensitivity and energy-resolution. This will allow us to study for the first time the nature of Fe-bearing dust in such regions.
  • We investigate the origin of the diffuse 6.4 keV line emission recently detected by Suzaku and the source of H_2ionization in the diffuse molecular gas of the Galactic Center (GC) region. We show that Fe atoms and H_2 molecules in the diffuse interstellar medium of the GC are not ionized by the same particles. The Fe atoms are most likely ionized by X-ray photons emitted by Sgr A* during a previous period of flaring activity of the supermassive black hole. The measured longitudinal intensity distribution of the diffuse 6.4 keV line emission is best explained if the past activity of Sgr A$* lasted at least several hundred years and released a mean 2-100 keV luminosity > 10^38} erg s^{-1}. The H_2 molecules of the diffuse gas can not be ionized by photons from Sgr A*, because soft photons are strongly absorbed in the interstellar gas around the central black hole. The molecular hydrogen in the GC region is most likely ionized by low-energy cosmic rays, probably protons rather than electrons, whose contribution into the diffuse 6.4 keV line emission is negligible.
  • Solar energetic particle (SEP) events are a prime opportunity to probe astrophysical particle acceleration by combining in-situ measurements of particles in space with remote sensing of the hard X-ray (HXR) and \gamma-ray emitting particles in the solar atmosphere. For the space environment SEPs are among the biggest hazards, particularly for spacecraft and human exploration of the solar system. Unfortunately our current understanding of the acceleration and transport of SEPs is weak. With the increasing onset of the space age it is vitally important that we increase our knowledge of the physical mechanisms related to SEPs. In this direction, the SEPServer project aims at building an on-line server that will provide the space research community with SEP data and related observations of solar electromagnetic emission. INTEGRAL/SPI acquires observations from many X-ray/\gamma-ray flares associated with SEP events. To make this data accessible for SEP studies we have undertaken a major effort to specify the solar observing conditionS of INTEGRAL through Monte-Carlo simulations of its BGO-detector response for several flares associated with selected SEP events.
  • Recent observations of high ionization rates of molecular hydrogen in diffuse interstellar clouds point to a distinct low-energy cosmic-ray component. Supposing that this component is made of nuclei, two models for the origin of such particles are explored and low-energy cosmic-ray spectra are calculated which, added to the standard cosmic ray spectra, produce the observed ionization rates. The clearest evidence of the presence of such low-energy nuclei between a few MeV per nucleon and several hundred MeV per nucleon in the interstellar medium would be a detection of nuclear \gamma-ray line emission in the range E_ 0.1 - 10 MeV, which is strongly produced in their collisions with the interstellar gas and dust. Using a recent \gamma-ray cross section compilation for nuclear collisions, \gamma-ray line emission spectra are calculated alongside with the high-energy \gamma-ray emission due to {\pi} 0 decay, the latter providing normalization of the absolute fluxes by comparison with Fermi-LAT observations of the diffuse emission above E \gamma = 0.1 GeV. Our predicted fluxes of strong nuclear \gamma-ray lines from the inner Galaxy are well below the detection sensitivies of INTEGRAL, but a detection, especially of the 4.4-MeV line, seems possible with new-generation \gamma-ray telescopes based on available technology. We predict also strong \gamma-ray continuum emission in the 1-8 MeV range, which in a large part of our model space for low-energy cosmic rays exceeds considerably estimated instrument sensitivities of future telescopes.
  • The high energy activity in the inner few degrees of the Galactic center is traced by diffuse radio, X-ray and gamma-ray emission. The physical relationship between different components of diffuse gas emitting at multiple wavelengths is a focus of this work. We first present radio continuum observations using Green Bank Telescope and model the nonthermal spectrum in terms of a broken power-law distribution of GeV electrons emitting synchrotron radiation. We show that the emission detected by Fermi is primarily due to nonthermal bremsstrahlung produced by the population of synchrotron emitting electrons in the GeV energy range interacting with neutral gas. The extrapolation of the electron population measured from radio data to low and high energies can also explain the origin of FeI 6.4 keV line and diffuse TeV emission, as observed with Suzaku, XMM-Newton, Chandra and the H.E.S.S. observatories. The inferred physical quantities from modeling multi-wavelength emission in the context of bremsstrahlung emission from the inner 300x120 parsecs of the Galactic center are constrained to have the cosmic ray ionization rate 1-10x10^{-15} s^-1, molecular gas heating rate elevating the gas temperature to 75-200K, fractional ionization of molecular gas 10^{-6} to 10^{-5}, large scale magnetic field 10-20 micro Gauss, the density of diffuse and dense molecular gas 100 and 10^3 cm^{-3} over 300pc and 50pc pathlengths, and the variability of FeI Kalpha 6.4 keV line emission on yearly time scales. Important implications of our study are that GeV electrons emitting in radio can explain the GeV gamma-rays detected by Fermi and that the cosmic ray irradiation model, like the model of the X-ray irradiation triggered by past activity of Sgr A*, can also explain the origin of the variable 6.4 keV emission from Galactic center molecular clouds.
  • Cosmic rays of kinetic energies below ~1 GeV per nucleon are thought to play a key role in the chemistry and dynamics of the interstellar medium. They are also thought to be responsible for nucleosynthesis of the light elements Li, Be, and B. However, very little is known about the flux and composition of low-energy cosmic rays since the solar modulation effect makes impossible a direct detection of these particles near Earth. We first discuss the information that the light elements have brought to cosmic-ray studies. We then discuss the prospects for detection of nuclear gamma-ray line emission produced by interaction of low-energy cosmic rays with interstellar nuclei.
  • The centre of our Galaxy harbours a 4 million solar mass black hole that is unusually quiet: its present X-ray luminosity is more than 10 orders of magnitude less than its Eddington luminosity. The observation of iron fluorescence and hard X-ray emission from some of the massive molecular clouds surrounding the Galactic Centre has been interpreted as an echo of a past flare. Alternatively, low-energy cosmic rays propagating inside the clouds might account for the observed emission, through inverse bremsstrahlung of low energy ions or bremsstrahlung emission of low energy electrons. Here we report the observation of a clear decay of the hard X-ray emission from the molecular cloud Sgr B2 during the past 7 years thanks to more than 20 Ms of INTEGRAL exposure. The measured decay time is compatible with the light crossing time of the molecular cloud core . Such a short timescale rules out inverse bremsstrahlung by cosmic-ray ions as the origin of the X ray emission. We also obtained 2-100 keV broadband X-ray spectra by combining INTEGRAL and XMM-Newton data and compared them with detailed models of X-ray emission due to irradiation of molecular gas by (i) low-energy cosmic-ray electrons and (ii) hard X-rays. Both models can reproduce the data equally well, but the time variability constraints and the huge cosmic ray electron luminosity required to explain the observed hard X-ray emission strongly favor the scenario in which the diffuse emission of Sgr B2 is scattered and reprocessed radiation emitted in the past by Sgr A*. Using recent parallax measurements that place Sgr B2 in front of Sgr A*, we find that the period of intense activity of Sgr A* ended between 75 and 155 years ago.
  • We discuss the origin of continuum and line X-ray emission observed in the direction the Galactic Center. We predict a significant flux of de-excitation gamma-ray lines in this direction, which can be produced by subrelativistic protons generated by accretion processes.
  • Aims. The accretion of stars onto the central supermassive black hole at the center of the Milky Way is predicted to generate large fluxes of subrelativistic ions in the Galactic center region. We analyze the intensity, shape and spatial distribution of de-excitation gamma-ray lines produced by nuclear interactions of these energetic particles with the ambient medium. Methods. We first estimate the amount and mean kinetic energy of particles released from the central black hole during star disruption. We then calculate from a kinetic equation the energy and spatial distributions of these particles in the Galactic center region. These particle distributions are then used to derive the characteristics of the main nuclear interaction gamma-ray lines. Results. Because the time period of star capture by the supermassive black hole is expected to be shorter than the lifetime of the ejected fast particles against Coulomb losses, the gamma-ray emission is predicted to be stationary. We find that the nuclear de-excitation lines should be emitted from a region of maximum 5$^\circ$ angular radius. The total gamma-ray line flux below 8 MeV is calculated to be $\approx10^{-4}$ photons cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$. The most promising lines for detection are those at 4.44 and $\sim$6.2 MeV, with a predicted flux in each line of $\approx$$10^{-5}$ photons cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$. Unfortunately, it is unlikely that this emission can be detected with the INTEGRAL observatory. But the predicted line intensities appear to be within reach of future gamma-ray space instruments. A future detection of de-excitation gamma-ray lines from the Galactic center region would provide unique information on the high-energy processes induced by the central supermassive black hole and the physical conditions of the emitting region.
  • Spectroscopic observations of the 2006 outburst of RS Oph at both infrared (IR) and X-ray wavelengths have shown that the blast wave has decelerated at a higher rate than predicted by the standard test-particle adiabatic shock-wave model. The observed blast-wave evolution can be explained, however, by the diffusive shock acceleration of particles at the forward shock and the subsequent escape of the highest energy ions from the acceleration region. Nonlinear particle acceleration can also account for the difference of shock velocities deduced from the IR and X-ray data. We discuss the evolution of the nova remnant in the light of efficient particle acceleration at the blast wave.
  • Nuclear interactions of ions accelerated at the surface of flaring stars can produce fresh isotopes in stellar atmospheres. Although this nucleosynthesis is not significant for the chemical evolution of the Galaxy, it can be important for a number of measurements of "anomalously" high 6-Li and 7-Li abundances. We discuss the possible role of stellar flares to explain the recent report of high 6-Li abundances in metal-poor halo stars and the well-established correlation between Li abundance and stellar activity in young open clusters. We then study the possibility of observing directly Li production during flares of nearby and active dwarfs of spectral type M.
  • Spectroscopic observations of the 2006 outburst of the recurrent nova RS Ophiuchi at both infrared (IR) and X-ray wavelengths have shown that the blast wave has decelerated at a higher rate than predicted by the standard test-particle adiabatic shock-wave model. Here we show that the observed evolution of the nova remnant can be explained by the diffusive shock acceleration of particles at the blast wave and the subsequent escape of the highest energy ions from the shock region. Nonlinear particle acceleration can also account for the difference of shock velocities deduced from the IR and X-ray data. The maximum energy that accelerated electrons and protons can have achieved in few days after outburst is found to be as high as a few TeV. Using the semi-analytic model of nonlinear diffusive shock acceleration developed by Berezhko & Ellison, we show that the postshock temperature of the shocked gas measured with RXTE/PCA and Swift/XRT imply a relatively moderate acceleration efficiency.
  • The high 6-Li abundances recently measured in metal-poor halo stars are far above the value predicted by Big Bang nucleosynthesis. They cannot be explained by galactic cosmic-ray interactions in the interstellar medium either. Various pre-galactic sources of 6-Li have been proposed in the literature. We study the possibility that the observed 6-Li was produced by repeated solar-like flares on the main sequence of these low-metallicity stars. The time-dependent flaring activity of these objects is estimated from the observed evolution of rotation-induced activity in Pop I dwarf stars. As in solar flares, 6-Li could be mainly created in interactions of flare-accelerated 3-He with stellar atmospheric 4-He, via the reaction 4-He(3-He,p)6-Li. Stellar dilution and destruction of flare-produced 6-Li are evaluated from the evolutionary models of metal-poor stars developed by Richard and co-workers. Stellar depletion should be less important for 6-Li atoms synthesized in flares than for those of protostellar origin. Theoretical frequency distributions of 6-Li/7-Li ratios are calculated using a Monte-Carlo method and compared with the observations. Excellent agreement is found with the measured 6-Li/7-Li distribution, when taking into account the contribution of protostellar 6-Li originating from galactic cosmic-ray nucleosynthesis. We propose as an observational test of the model to seek for a positive correlation between 6-Li/7-Li and stellar rotation velocity. We also show that the amounts of 7-Li, Be and B produced in flares of metal-poor halo stars are negligible as compared with the measured abundances of these species. 6-Li in low-metallicity stars may be a unique evidence of the nuclear processes occuring in stellar flares.
  • The early E < 511 keV gamma-ray emission from novae depends critically on the 18F(p,a)15O reaction. Unfortunately the reaction rate of the 18F(p,a)15O reaction is still largely uncertain due to the unknown strengths of low-lying proton resonances near the 18F+p threshold which play an important role in the nova temperature regime. We report here our last results concerning the study of the d(18F,p)19F(alpha)15N transfer reaction. We show in particular that these two low-lying resonances cannot be neglected. These results are then used to perform a careful study of the remaining uncertainties associated to the 18F(p,a)15O and 18F(p,g)19Ne reaction rates.
  • A new generation of Ge-based high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometers has allowed accurate measurements to be made of the profiles, widths and energies of the gamma-ray lines emitted in the impulsive phases of solar flares. Here we present measurements in two flares of the energies of the de-excitation lines of 12C and 16O at 4.4 and 6.1 MeV respectively by the Ge spectrometer SPI on board INTEGRAL, from which Doppler shifts are derived and compared with those expected from the recoil of 12C and 16O nuclei which were excited by the impacts of flare-accelerated ions. An anomalous Doppler measurement (in terms of recoil theory) has been reported by the Ge spectrometer RHESSI in a flare near the east limb, and explained by a tilt of the magnetic field lines at the footpoint of a magnetic loop away from the vertical, and towards the observer. This might be interpreted to imply a significant difference between the Doppler shifts on the east and west limbs, if it is a general phenomenon. SPI observed both east and west limb flares and found no significant difference in Doppler shifts. We also measured the shapes and fluences of these lines, and their fluence ratio to the 2.2 MeV line from the capture of flare-generated neutrons. Analyses of both quantities using thick-target models parametrized by solar physical and geometric quantities suggest that the two flares studied here also have magnetic fields tilted towards the observer, though the significance of the measurements is not high.