• Nonlinear optical methods are becoming ubiquitous in many areas of modern photonics. They are, however, often limited to a certain range of input parameters, such as pulse energy and average power, since restrictions arise from, for example, parasitic nonlinear effects, damage problems and geometrical considerations. Here, we show that many nonlinear optics phenomena in gaseous media are scale-invariant if spatial coordinates, gas density and laser pulse energy are scaled appropriately. We develop a general scaling model for (3+1)-dimensional wave equations, demonstrating the invariant scaling of nonlinear pulse propagation in gases. Our model is numerically applied to high-order harmonic generation and filamentation as well as experimentally verified using the example of pulse post-compression via filamentation. Our results provide a simple recipe for up-or downscaling of nonlinear processes in gases with numerous applications in many areas of science.
  • We demonstrate control over attosecond pulse generation and shaping by numerically optimizing the synthesis of few-cycle to sub-cycle driver waveforms. The optical waveform synthesis takes place in an ultrabroad spectral band covering the ultraviolet-infrared domain. These optimized driver waves are used for ultrashort single and double attosecond pulse production (with tunable separation) revealing the potentials of the light wave synthesizer device demonstrated by Wirth et al. [Science 334, 195 (2011)]. The results are also analyzed with respect to attosecond pulse propagation phenomena.
  • We calculate high-harmonic generation (HHG) by intense infrared lasers in atoms and molecules with the inclusion of macroscopic propagation of the harmonics in the gas medium. We show that the observed experimental spectra can be accurately reproduced theoretically despite that HHG spectra are sensitive to the experimental conditions. We further demonstrate that the simulated (or experimental) HHG spectra can be factored out as a product of a \macroscopic wave packet" and the photo-recombination transition dipole moment where the former depends on the laser properties and the experimental conditions, while the latter is the property of the target only. The factorization makes it possible to extract target structure from experimental HHG spectra, and for ultrafast dynamic imaging of transient molecules.