• Hot channel (HC) structure, observed in the high-temperature passbands of the AIA/SDO, is regarded as one candidate of coronal flux rope which is an essential element of solar eruptions. Here we present the first radio imaging study of an HC structure in the metric wavelength. The associated radio emission manifests as a moving type-IV (t-IVm) burst. We show that the radio sources co-move outwards with the HC, indicating that the t-IV emitting energetic electrons are efficiently trapped within the structure. The t-IV sources at different frequencies present no considerable spatial dispersion during the early stage of the event, while the sources spread gradually along the eruptive HC structure at later stage with significant spatial dispersion. The t-IV bursts are characterized by a relatively-high brightness temperature ($\sim$ 10$^{7}$ $-$ 10$^{9}$ K), a moderate polarization, and a spectral shape that evolves considerably with time. This study demonstrates the possibility of imaging the eruptive HC structure at the metric wavelength and provides strong constraints on the t-IV emision mechanism, which, if understood, can be used to diagnose the essential parameters of the eruptive structure.
  • Type III and type-III-like radio bursts are produced by energetic electron beams guided along coronal magnetic fields. As a variant of type III bursts, Type N bursts appear as the letter "N" in the radio dynamic spectrum and reveal a magnetic mirror effect in coronal loops. Here, we report a well-observed N-shaped burst consisting of three successive branches at metric wavelength with both fundamental and harmonic components and a high brightness temperature ($>$10$^9$ K). We verify the burst as a true type N burst generated by the same electron beam from three aspects of the data. First, durations of the three branches at a given frequency increase gradually, may due to the dispersion of the beam along its path. Second, the flare site, as the only possible source of non-thermal electrons, is near the western feet of large-scale closed loops. Third, the first branch and the following two branches are localized at different legs of the loops with opposite sense of polarization. We also find that the sense of polarization of the radio burst is in contradiction to the O-mode and there exists a fairly large time delay ($\sim$3-5 s) between the fundamental and harmonic components. Possible explanations accounting for these observations are presented. Assuming the classical plasma emission mechanism, we can infer coronal parameters such as electron density and magnetic field near the radio source and make diagnostics on the magnetic mirror process.
  • The Type-II solar radio burst recorded on 13 June 2010 by the radio spectrograph of the Hiraiso Solar Observatory was employed to estimate the magnetic-field strength in the solar corona. The burst was characterized by a well pronounced band-splitting, which we used to estimate the density jump at the shock and Alfven Mach number using the Rankine-Hugoniot relations. The plasma frequency of the Type-II bursts is converted into height [R] in solar radii using the appropriate density model, then we estimated the shock speed [Vs], coronal Alfven velocity [Va], and the magnetic-field strength at different heights. The relative bandwidth of the band-split is found to be in the range 0.2 -- 0.25, corresponding to the density jump of X = 1.44 -- 1.56, and the Alfven Mach number of MA = 1.35 -- 1.45. The inferred mean shock speed was on the order of V ~ 667 km/s. From the dependencies V(R) and MA(R) we found that Alfven speed slightly decreases at R ~ 1.3 -- 1.5. The magnetic-field strength decreases from a value between 2.7 and 1.7 G at R ~ 1.3 -- 1.5 Rs depending on the coronal-density model employed. We find that our results are in good agreement with the empirical scaling by Dulk and McLean (Solar Phys. 57, 279, 1978) and Gopalswamy et al. (Astrophys. J. 744, 72, 2012). Our result shows that Type-II band splitting method is an important tool for inferring the coronal magnetic field, especially when independent measurements were made from white light observations.