• Extracting sources with low signal-to-noise from maps with structured background is a non-trivial task which has become important in studying the faint end of the submillimetre number counts. In this article we study source extraction from submillimetre jiggle-maps from the Submillimetre Common-User Bolometer Array (SCUBA) using the Mexican Hat Wavelet (MHW), an isotropic wavelet technique. As a case study we use a large (11.8 arcmin^2) jiggle-map of the galaxy cluster Abell 2218, with a 850um 1sigma r.m.s. sensitivity of 0.6-1mJy. We show via simulations that MHW is a powerful tool for reliable extraction of low signal-to-noise sources from SCUBA jiggle-maps and nine sources are detected in the A2218 850um image. Three of these sources are identified as images of a single background source with an unlensed flux of 0.8mJy. Further, two single-imaged sources also have unlensed fluxes <2mJy, below the blank-field confusion limit. In this ultradeep map, the individual sources detected resolve nearly all of the extragalactic background light at 850um, and the deep data allow to put an upper limit of 44 sources per arcmin^2 to 0.2mJy at 850um.
  • Long duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) accompany the deaths of some massive stars and hence, since massive stars are short lived, are a tracer of star formation activity. Given that GRBs are bright enough to be seen to very high redshifts, and detected even in dusty environments, they should therefore provide a powerful probe of the global star formation history of the universe. The potential of this approach can be investigated via submm photometry of GRB host galaxies. Submm luminosity also correlates with star formation rate, so the distribution of host galaxy submm fluxes should allow us to test the two methods for consistency. Here, we report new JCMT/SCUBA 850 micron measurements for 15 GRB hosts. Combining these data with results from previous studies we construct a sample of 21 hosts with <1.4 mJy errors. We show that the distribution of apparent 850 micron flux densities of this sample is reasonably consistent with model predictions, but there is tentative evidence of a dearth of submm bright (>4 mJy) galaxies. Furthermore, the optical/infrared properties of the submm brightest GRB hosts are not typical of the galaxy population selected in submm surveys, although the sample size is still small. Possible selection effects and physical mechanisms which may explain these discrepancies are discussed.
  • We present the results of a search for submillimetre-luminous host galaxies of optically dark gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) using the Submillimetre Common-User Bolometer Array (SCUBA) on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT). We made photometry measurements of the 850-micron flux at the location of four `dark bursts', which are those with no detected optical afterglow despite rapid deep searches, and which may therefore be within galaxies containing substantial amounts of dust. We were unable to detect any individual source significantly. Our results are consistent with predictions for the host galaxy population as a whole, rather than for a subset of dusty hosts. This indicates that optically dark GRBs are not especially associated with very submillimetre-luminous galaxies and so cannot be used as reliable indicators of dust-enshrouded massive star-formation activity. Further observations are required to establish the relationship between the wider GRB host galaxy population and SCUBA galaxies.