• It is shown that the cosmological constant links the roots both of General Relativity and Newtonian gravity via the general function satisfying the Newton's theorem that the gravitating sphere acts as a point mass situated in its center. The quantitative evidence for this link is given via the correspondence of the current value of the cosmological constant with the value of the cosmological term in the modified Newtonian gravity to explain the dark matter in the galaxies. This approach reveals: (a) the nature of the dark matter as gravity's signature, (b) the common nature of the dark matter and of the cosmological constant (dark energy), (c) the dark matter as repulsive gravity and increasing with the squared distance ensures the observed higher mass-to-luminosity M/L ratio while moving from the scales of galaxies to galaxy clusters. The galactic halos via non-force-free interaction of the repulsive dark matter determine the galactic disks and the flat rotation curves. Among the consequences of such modified General Relativity is the natural link to AdS/CFT correspondence.
  • Frame dragging, one of the outstanding phenomena predicted by General Relativity, is efficiently studied by means of the laser-ranged satellites LARES, LAGEOS and LAGEOS 2. The accurate analysis of the orbital perturbations of Earth's solid and ocean tides has been relevant for increasing the accuracy in the test of frame-dragging using these three satellites. The Earth's tidal perturbations acting on the LARES satellite are obtained for the 110 significant modes of corresponding Doodson number and are exhibited to enable the comparison to those of the LAGEOS and LAGEOS-2 satellites. For LARES we represent 29 perturbation modes for l=2,3,4 for ocean tides.
  • This paper is a follow-up of a previous paper about the M82 galaxy and its halo based on Planck observations. As in the case of M82, so also for the M81 galaxy a substantial North-South and East-West temperature asymmetry is found, extending up to galactocentric distances of about $1.5^\circ$. The temperature asymmetry is almost frequency independent and can be interpreted as a Doppler-induced effect related to the M81 halo rotation and/or triggered by the gravitational interaction of the galaxies within the M81 Group. Along with the analogous study of several nearby edge-on spiral galaxies, the CMB temperature asymmetry method thus is shown to act as a direct tool to map the galactic haloes and/or the intergalactic bridges, invisible in other bands or by other methods.
  • We used Planck data to study the M33 galaxy and find a substantial temperature asymmetry with respect to its minor axis projected onto the sky plane. This temperature asymmetry correlates well with the HI velocity field at 21 cm, at least within a galactocentric distance of 0.5 degree, and it is found to extend up to about 3 degrees from the galaxy center. We conclude that the revealed effect, that is, the temperature asymmetry and its extension, implies that we detected the differential rotation of the M33 galaxy and of its extended baryonic halo.
  • The arrow of time and the accelerated expansion are two fundamental empirical facts of the Universe. We advance the viewpoint that the dark energy (positive cosmological constant) accelerating the expansion of the Universe also supports the time asymmetry. It is related to the decay of meta-stable states under generic perturbations, as we show on example of a microcanonical ensemble. These states will not be meta-stable without dark energy. The latter also ensures a hyperbolic motion leading to dynamic entropy production with the rate determined by the cosmological constant.
  • Planck data towards the galaxy M82 are analyzed in the 70, 100 and 143 GHz bands. A substantial north-south and East-West temperature asymmetry is found, extending up to 1 degree from the galactic center. Being almost frequency-independent, these temperature asymmetries are indicative of a Doppler-induced effect regarding the line-of-sight dynamics on the halo scale, the ejections from the galactic center and, possibly, even the tidal interaction with M81 galaxy. The temperature asymmetry thus acts as a model-independent tool to reveal the bulk dynamics in nearby edge-on spiral galaxies, like the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect for clusters of galaxies.
  • Planck data towards the active galaxy Centaurus A are analyzed in the 70, 100 and 143 GHz bands. We find a temperature asymmetry of the northern radio lobe with respect to the southern one that clearly extends at least up to 5 degrees from the Cen A center and diminishes towards the outer regions of the lobes. That transparent parameter - the temperature asymmetry - thus has to carry a principal information, i.e. indication on the line-of-sight bulk motion of the lobes, while the increase of that asymmetry at smaller radii reveals the differential dynamics of the lobes as expected at ejections from the center.
  • The recently developed method (Paper 1) enabling one to investigate the evolution of dynamical systems with an accuracy not dependent on time is developed further. The classes of dynamical systems which can be studied by that method are much extended, now including systems that are; (1) non-Hamiltonian, conservative; (2) Hamiltonian with time-dependent perturbation; (3) non-conservative (with dissipation). These systems cover various types of N-body gravitating systems of astrophysical and cosmological interest, such as the orbital evolution of planets, minor planets, artificial satellites due to tidal, non-tidal perturbations and thermal thrust, evolving close binary stellar systems, and the dynamics of accretion disks.
  • The Kolmogorov-Arnold stochasticity parameter technique is applied for the first time to the study of cancer genome sequencing, to reveal mutations. Using data generated by next generation sequencing technologies, we have analyzed the exome sequences of brain tumor patients with matched tumor and normal blood. We show that mutations contained in sequencing data can be revealed using this technique thus providing a new methodology for determining subsequences of given length containing mutations i.e. its value differs from those of subsequences without mutations. A potential application for this technique involves simplifying the procedure of finding segments with mutations, speeding up genomic research, and accelerating its implementation in clinical diagnostic. Moreover, the prediction of a mutation associated to a family of frequent mutations in numerous types of cancers based purely on the value of the Kolmogorov function, indicates that this applied marker may recognize genomic sequences that are in extremely low abundance and can be used in revealing new types of mutations.
  • The structure of the cold spot, of a non-Gaussian anomaly in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) sky first detected by Vielva et al. is studied using the data by Planck satellite. The obtained map of the degree of stochasticity (K-map) of CMB for the cold spot, reveals, most clearly in 100 GHz band, a shell-type structure with a center coinciding with the minima of the temperature distribution. The shell structure is non-Gaussian at a 4\sigma confidence level. Such behavior of the K-map supports the void nature of the cold spot. The applied method can be used for tracing voids that have no signatures in redshift surveys.
  • Planck's data acquired during the first 15.4 months of observations towards both the disk and halo of the M31 galaxy are analyzed. We confirm the existence of a temperature asymmetry, previously detected by using the 7-year WMAP data, along the direction of the M31 rotation, therefore indicative of a Doppler-induced effect. The asymmetry extends up to about 10 degrees (about 130 kpc) from the M31 center. We also investigate the recent issue raised in Rubin and Loeb (2014) about the kinetic Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect from the diffuse hot gas in the Local Group, predicted to generate a hot spot of a few degrees size in the CMB maps in the direction of M31, where the free electron optical depth gets the maximum value. We also consider the issue whether in the opposite direction with respect to the M31 galaxy the same effect induces a minimum in temperature in the Planck's maps of the sky. We find that the Planck's data at 100 GHz show an effect even larger than that expected.
  • Baryons constitute about 4% of our universe, but most of them are missing and we do not know where and in what form they are hidden. This constitute the so-called missing baryon problem. A possibility is that part of these baryons are hidden in galactic halos. We show how the 7-year data obtained by the WMAP satellite may be used to trace the halo of the nearby giant spiral galaxy M31. We detect a temperature asymmetry in the M31 halo along the rotation direction up to about 120 kpc. This could be the first detection of a galactic halo in microwaves and may open a new way to probe hidden baryons in these relatively less studied galactic objects using high accuracy CMB measurements.
  • Data on the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) had a profound impact on the understanding of a variety of physical processes in the early phases of the Universe and on the estimation of the cosmological parameters. Here, the 7-year WMAP data are used to trace the disk and the halo of the nearby giant spiral galaxy M31. We analyzed the temperature excess in three WMAP bands (W, V, and Q) by dividing the region of the sky around M31 into several concentric circular areas. We studied the robustness of the detected temperature excess by considering 500 random control fields in the real WMAP maps and simulating 500 sky maps from the best-fitted cosmological parameters. By comparing the obtained temperature contrast profiles with the real ones towards the M31 galaxy, we find that the temperature asymmetry in the M31 disk is fairly robust, while the effect in the halo is weaker. An asymmetry in the mean microwave temperature in the M31 disk along the direction of the M31 rotation is observed with a temperature contrast up to about 130 microK/pixel. We also find a temperature asymmetry in the M31 halo, which is much weaker than for the disk, up to a galactocentric distance of about 10 degrees (120 kpc) with a peak temperature contrast of about 40 microK/pixel. Although the confidence level of the signal is not high, if estimated purely statistically, which could be expected due to the weakness of the effect, the geometrical structure of the temperature asymmetry points towards a definite effect modulated by the rotation of the M31 halo. This result might open a new way to probe these relatively less studied galactic objects using high-accuracy CMB measurements, such as those with the Planck satellite or planned balloon-based experiments, which could prove or disprove our conclusions.
  • The Kolmogorov stochasticity parameter is shown to act as a tool to detect point sources in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation temperature maps. Kolmogorov CMB map constructed for the WMAP's 7-year datasets reveals tiny structures which in part coincide with point radio and Fermi/LAT gamma-ray sources. In the first application of this method, we identified several sources not present in the then available 0FGL Fermi catalog. Subsequently they were confirmed in the more recent and more complete 1FGL catalog, thus strengthening the evidence for the power of this methodology.
  • The possibility of anisotropies in the speed of light relative to the limiting speed of electrons is considered. The absence of sidereal variations in the energy of Compton-edge photons at the ESRF's GRAAL facility constrains such anisotropies representing the first non-threshold collision-kinematics study of Lorentz violation. When interpreted within the minimal Standard-Model Extension, this result yields the two-sided limit of 1.6 x 10^{-14} at 95% confidence level on a combination of the parity-violating photon and electron coefficients kappa_{o+} and c. This new constraint provides an improvement over previous bounds by one order of magnitude.
  • The power spectrum is obtained for the Kolmogorov stochasticity parameter map for WMAP's cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation temperature datasets. The interest for CMB Kolmogorov map is that it can carry direct information about voids in the matter distribution, so that the correlations in the distribution of voids have to be reflected in the power spectrum. Although limited by the angular resolution of the WMAP, this analysis shows the possibility of acquiring this crucial information via CMB maps. Even the already obtained behavior, some of which is absent in the simulated maps, can influence the development of views on the void correlations at the large-scale web formation.
  • The chaos in stellar systems is studied using the theory of dynamical systems and the Van Kampen stochastic differential equation approach. The exponential instability (chaos) of spherical N-body gravitating systems, already known previously, is confirmed. The characteristic timescale of that instability is estimated confirming the collective relaxation time obtained by means of the Maupertuis principle.
  • Chaotic dynamics essentially defines the global properties of gravitating systems, including, probably, the basics of morphology of galaxies. We use the Ricci curvature criterion to study the degree of relative chaos (exponential instability) in core-halo gravitating configurations. We show the existence of a critical core radius when the system is least chaotic, while systems with both smaller and larger core radius will typically possess stronger chaotic properties.
  • We describe briefly a novel interpretation of the physical nature of dark energy (DE), based on the vacuum fluctuations model by Gurzadyan & Xue, and describe an internally consistent solution for the behavor of DE as a function of redshift. A key choice is the nature of the upper bound used for the computation of energy density contributions by vacuum modes. We show that use of the comoving horizon radius produces a viable model, whereas use of the proper horizon radius is inconsistent with the observations. After introduction of a single phenomenological parameter, the model is consistent with all of the curently available data, and fits them as well as the standard cosmological constant model, while making testable predictions. While some substantial interpretative uncertainties remain, future developments of this model may lead to significant new insights into the physical nature of DE.
  • The properties of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) maps carry valuable cosmological information. Here we report the results of the analysis hot and cold CMB anisotropy spots in the BOOMERanG 150 GHz map in terms of number, area, ellipticity, vs. temperature threshold. We carried out this analysis for the map obtained by summing independent measurement channels (signal plus noise map) and for a comparison map (noise only map) obtained by differencing the same channels. The anisotropy areas (spots) have been identified for both maps for various temperature thresholds and a catalog of the spots has been produced. The orientation (obliquity) of the spots is random for both maps. We computed the mean elongation of spots obtained from the maps at a given temperature threshold using a simple estimator. We found that for the sum map there is a region of temperature thresholds where the average elongation is not dependent on the threshold. Its value is ~ 2.3 for cold areas and ~ 2.2 for hot areas. This is a non-trivial result. The bias of the estimator is less than 0.4 for areas of size less than 30', and smaller for larger areas. The presence of noise also biases the ellipticity by less than 0.3. These biases have not been subtracted in the results quoted above. The threshold independent and random obliquity behaviour in the sum map is stable against pointing reconstruction accuracy and noise level of the data, thus confirming that these are actual properties of the dataset. The data used here give a hint of high ellipticity for the largest spots. Analogous elongation properties of CMB anisotropies had been detected for COBE-DMR 4-year data. If this is due to geodesics mixing, it would point to a non zero curvature of the Universe.
  • The relation between the thermodynamical and cosmological arrows of time is usually viewed in the context of the initial conditions of the Universe. It is a necessary but not sufficient condition for ensuring the thermodynamical arrow. We point out that in the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker Universe with negative curvature, k=-1, there is the second necessary ingredient. It is based on the geodesic mixing - the dynamical instability of motion along null geodesics in hyperbolic space. Kolmogorov (algorithmic) complexity as a universal and experimentally measurable concept can be very useful in description of this chaotic behavior using the data on Cosmic Microwave Background radiation. The formulated {\it curvature anthropic principle} states the negative curvature as a necessary condition for the time asymmetric Universe with an observer.
  • When considering the statistical properties of a bundle of cosmic microwave background (CMB) photons propagating through space, the effect of `mixing geodesics' appears with a distinct signature that depends on the geometry of space. In a Universe with negative curvature this effect is expected to produce elongated anisotropy spots on CMB maps. We used COBE-DMR data to look for such effect. Based on the analysis of a measure of eccentricity of hot spots it appears that there is a clear indication of an excess eccentricity of hot spots with respect to that expected from noise alone. This result must be interpreted with caution as this effect can be due in part to galactic emission. If the detected eccentricity of anisotropy spots can be attributed to the effect of mixing it implies the negative curvature of the Universe and a value of $\Omega < 1$.
  • Results of precise measurements of the periods of pulsars discovered in the central regions of globular clusters are shown to be approaching the capabilities of testing the existence of a central black hole. For example, in the case of M 15 the available data on two pulsars PSR 2129+1210A and PSR 2129+1209D seem to exclude the existence of a black hole, the presence of which was instead supported by recent Hubble Space Telescope data on surface brightness profile (Yanny et al. 1994). The fluctuations of the gravitational field caused by the stars of the system are enough to explain the acceleration observed for both pulsars. In the case of the Galactic center, additional data are needed for similar definite conclusions.
  • We report the results of an analysis of the hierarchical properties of the cluster of galaxies Abell 119. Observational data from the ESO Nearby Abell Cluster Survey (ENACS) are used, complemented by data from previous studies, while the analysis is performed with the S-tree method. The main physical system and its three subgroups with truncated Gaussian velocity distributions are identified; due to their remarkable physical features and possible cosmogonical mission we call these subgroups ``galaxy associations''. The mass centre of the core of main system is shown to coincide with the X-ray centre of the cluster. An alignment of the mass centres of the 3 galaxy associations is also shown.