• The assembly and maturation of viruses with icosahedral capsids must be coordinated with icosahedral symmetry. The icosahedral symmetry imposes also the restrictions on the cooperative specific interactions between genomic RNA/DNA and coat proteins that should be reflected in quasi-regular segmentation of viral genomic sequences. Combining discrete direct and double Fourier transforms, we studied the quasi-regular large-scale segmentation in genomic sequences of different ssRNA, ssDNA, and dsDNA viruses. The particular representatives included satellite tobacco mosaic virus and the strains of satellite tobacco necrosis virus, STNV-C, STNV-1, STNV-2, Escherichia phages MS2, phiX174, alpha3, and HK97, and Simian virus 40. In all their genomes, we found the significant quasi-regular segmentation of genomic sequences related to the virion assembly and the genome packaging within icosahedral capsid. We also found good correspondence between our results and available cryo-electron microscopy data on capsid structures and genome packaging in these viruses. Fourier analysis of genomic sequences provides the additional insight into mechanisms of hierarchical genome packaging and may be used for verification of the concepts of 3-fold or 5-fold intermediates in virion assembly. The results of sequence analysis should be taken into account at the choice of models and data interpretation. They also may be helpful for the development of antiviral drugs.
  • The main statistical distributions applicable to the analysis of genome architecture and genome tracks are briefly discussed and critically assessed. Although the observed features in distributions of element lengths can be equally well fitted by the different statistical approximations, the interpretation of observed regularities may strongly depend on the chosen scheme. We discuss the possible evolution scenarios and describe the main characteristics obtained with different distributions. The expression for the assessment of levels in hierarchical chromatin folding is derived and the quantitative measure of genome architecture inhomogeneity is suggested. This theory provides the ground for the regular statistical study of genome architecture and genome tracks.
  • We analyzed the periodic patterns in E. coli promoters and compared the distributions of the corresponding patterns in promoters and in the complete genome to elucidate their function. Except the three-base periodicity, coincident with that in the coding regions and growing stronger in the region downstream from the transcriptions start (TS), all other salient periodicities are peaked upstream of TS. We found that helical periodicities with the lengths about B-helix pitch ~10.2-10.5 bp and A-helix pitch ~10.8-11.1 bp coexist in the genomic sequences. We mapped the distributions of stretches with A-, B-, and Z- like DNA periodicities onto E.coli genome. All three periodicities tend to concentrate within non-coding regions when their intensity becomes stronger and prevail in the promoter sequences. The comparison with available experimental data indicates that promoters with the most pronounced periodicities may be related to the supercoiling-sensitive genes.
  • Periodic patterns play the important regulatory and structural roles in genomic DNA sequences. Commonly, the underlying periodicities should be understood in a broad statistical sense, since the corresponding periodic patterns have been strongly distorted by the random point mutations and insertions/deletions during molecular evolution. The latent periodicities in DNA sequences can be efficiently displayed by Fourier transform. The criteria of significance for observed periodicities are obtained via the comparison versus the counterpart characteristics of the reference random sequences. We show that the restrictions imposed on the significance criteria by the rigorous spectral sum rules can be rationally described with De Finetti distribution. This distribution provides the convenient intermediate asymptotic form between Rayleigh distribution and exact combinatoric theory.
  • We examine how the shape of cells and the geometry of experiment affect the reaction-diffusion kinetics at the binding between target and probe molecules on molecular biochips. In particular, we compare the binding kinetics for the probes immobilized on surface of the semispherical and flat circular cells, the limit of thin slab of analyte solution over probe cell as well as hemispherical gel pads and cells printed in gel slab over a substrate. It is shown that hemispherical geometry provides significantly faster binding kinetics and ensures more spatially homogeneous distribution of local (from a pixel) signals over a cell in the transient regime. The advantage of using thin slabs with small volume of analyte solution may be hampered by the much longer binding kinetics needing the auxiliary mixing devices. Our analysis proves that the shape of cells and the geometry of experiment should be included to the list of essential factors at biochip designing.