• We study the quantum reflection of ultracold antihydrogen atoms bouncing on the surface of a liquid helium film. The Casimir-Polder potential and quantum reflection are calculated for different thicknesses of the film supported by different substrates. Antihydrogen can be protected from anni- hilation for as long as 1.3s on a bulk of liquid 4He, and 1.7s for liquid 3He. These large lifetimes open interesting perspectives for spectroscopic measurements of the free fall acceleration of antihydrogen. Variation of the scattering length with the thickness of a film of helium shows interferences which we interpret through a Liouville transformation of the quantum reflection problem.
  • We performed precision measurements of the probability of small heating and spectrum of UCNs up-scattered on the surface of hydrogen-free oil Fomblin Y-HVAC 18/8 as a function of temperature. The probability is well reproducible, does not depend on sample thickness and does not evolve in time. It is equal (9.8+-0.2)10^(-6) at the ambient temperature. The spectrum coincides with those measured with solid-surface and nanoparticle samples. Indirect arguments indicate that spectrum shape weakly depends on temperature. Measured experimental data can be satisfactory described both within the model of near-surface nanodroplets and the model of capillary waves.
  • An ideal solid-state supermirror (SM) neutron polarizer assumes total reflection of neutrons from the SM coating for one spin-component and total absorption for the other, thus providing a perfectly polarized neutron beam at the exit. However, in practice, the substrate's neutron-nucleai optical potential does not match perfectly that for spin-down neutrons in the SM. For a positive step in the optical potential (as in a Fe/SiN(x) SM on Si substrate), this mismatch results in spin-independent total reflection for neutrons with small momentum transfer Q, limiting the useful neutron bandwidth in the low-Q region. To overcome this limitation, we propose to replace Si single-crystal substrates by media with higher optical potential than that for spin-down neutrons in the SM ferromagnetic layers. We found single-crystal sapphire and single-crystal quartz as good candidates for solid-state Fe/SiN(x) SM polarizers. To verify this idea, we coated a thick plate of single-crystal sapphire with a m=2.4 Fe/SiN(x) SM. At the T3 instrument at the ILL, we measured the spin-up and spin-down reflectivity curves with 7.5 A neutrons incident from the substrate to the interface between the substrate and the SM coating. The results of this experimental test were in excellent agreement with our expectations: the bandwidth of high polarizing power extended significantly into the low-Q region. This finding, together with the possibility to apply a strong magnetizing field, opens a new road to produce high-efficient solid-state SM polarizers with an extended neutron wavelength bandwidth and near-to-perfect polarizing power.
  • We study an effect of quenching of antihydrogen quantum states near material surface in the gravitational field of the Earth by local charges randomly distributed along the mirror surface. The quenching mechanism reduces the quantum reflection probability because of additional atom-charge interaction and nonadiabatic transitions to excited gravitational states. Our approach is suitable for accounting for quenching caused by any kind of additional interaction with the characteristic range much smaller than the typical gravitational state wave-length.
  • We consider ultracold neutron (UCN) sources based on a new method of UCN production in superfluid helium (4He). The PIK reactor is chosen as a perspective example of the application of this idea, which consists of installing a 4He UCN source in a beam of thermal or cold neutrons and surrounding the source with a moderator-reflector, which plays the role of a source of cold neutrons (CNs) feeding the UCN source. The CN flux in the source can be several times larger than the incident flux, due to multiple neutron reflections from the moderator-reflector. We show that such a source at the PIK reactor would provide an order of magnitude larger density and production rate than an analogous source at the ILL reactor. We estimate parameters of a 4He source with solid methane (CH4) or/and liquid deuterium (D2) moderator-reflector. We show that such a source with CH4 moderator-reflector at the PIK reactor would provide the UCN density of ~1x10^5 1/cm^3, and the UCN production rate of ~2x10^7 1/s. These values are respectively 1000 and 20 times larger than those for the most intense UCN user source. The UCN density in a source with D2 moderator-reflector would reach the value of ~2x10^5 1/cm^3, and the UCN production rate would be equal ~8x10^7 1/s. Installation of such sources in beams of CNs with equal flux would slightly increase the density and production rate.
  • We study an interferometric approach to measure gravitational mass of antihydrogen. The method consists of preparing a coherent superposition of antihydrogen quantum state localized near a material surface in the gravitational field of the Earth, and then observing the time distribution of annihilation events followed after the free fall of an initially prepared superposition from a given height to the detector plate. We show that a corresponding time distribution is related to the momentum distribution in the initial state that allows its precise measurement. This approach is combined with a method of production of a coherent superposition of gravitational states by inducing a resonant transition using oscillating gradient magnetic field. We estimate an accuracy of measuring the gravitational mass of antihydrogen atom which could be deduced from such a measurement.
  • Quantum states of ultracold neutrons in the gravitational field are to be characterized through gravitational resonance spectroscopy. This paper discusses systematic effects that appear in the spectroscopic measurements. The discussed frequency shifts, which we call Stern-Gerlach shift, interference shift, and spectator state shift, appear in conceivable measurement schemes and have general importance. These shifts have to be taken into account in precision experiments.
  • We study a method to induce resonant transitions between antihydrogen ($\bar{H}$) quantum states above a material surface in the gravitational field of the Earth. The method consists of applying a gradient of magnetic field, which is temporally oscillating with the frequency equal to a frequency of transition between gravitational states of antihydrogen. A corresponding resonant change in the spatial density of antihydrogen atoms could be measured as a function of the frequency of applied field. We estimate an accuracy of measuring antihydrogen gravitational states spacing and show how a value of the gravitational mass of the $\bar{H}$ atom could be deduced from such a measurement. We also demonstrate that a method of induced transitions could be combined with a free-fall-time measurement in order to further improve the precision.
  • We study a method to induce resonant transitions between antihydrogen quantum states above a material surface in the gravitational field of the Earth. The method consists in applying a gradient of magnetic field which is temporally oscillating with the frequency equal to a frequency of a transition between gravitational states of antihydrogen. Corresponding resonant change in a spatial density of antihydrogen atoms can be measured as a function of the frequency of applied field. We estimate an accuracy of measuring antihydrogen gravitational states spacing and show how a value of the gravitational mass of the antihydrogen atom can be deduced from such a measurement.
  • We study quantum reflection of antihydrogen atoms from matter slabs due to the van der Waals/Casimir-Polder (vdW/CP) potential. By taking into account the specificities of antihydrogen and the optical properties and width of the slabs we calculate realistic estimates for the potential and quantum reflection amplitudes. Next we discuss the paradoxical result of larger reflection coefficients estimated for weaker potentials in terms of the Schwarzian derivative. We analyze the limiting case of reflections at small energies, which are characterized by a scattering length and have interesting applications for trapping and guiding antihydrogen using material walls.
  • We study quantum reflection of antihydrogen atoms from nanoporous media due to the Casimir-Polder (CP) potential. Using a simple effective medium model, we show a dramatic increase of the probability of quantum reflection of antihydrogen atoms if the porosity of the medium increases. We discuss the limiting case of reflections at small energies, which have interesting applications for trapping and guiding antihydrogen using material walls.
  • We present a theoretical study of the motion of the antihydrogen atom ($\bar{H}$) in the Earth's gravitational field above a material surface. We predict that $\bar{H}$ atom, falling in the Earth's gravitational field above a material surface, would settle in long-living quantum states. We point out a method of measuring the difference in energy of $\bar{H}$ in such states that allow us to apply spectroscopy of gravitational levels based on atom-interferometric principles. We analyze a general feasibility to perform experiments of this kind. We point out that such experiments provide a method of measuring the gravitational force ($Mg$) acting on $\bar{H}$ and they might be of interest in a context of testing the Weak Equivalence Principle for antimatter.
  • We predicted and observed for the first time the quasi-specular albedo of cold neutrons at small incidence angles from a powder of nanoparticles. This albedo (reflection) is due to multiple neutron small-angle scattering. The reflection angle as well as the half-width of angular distribution of reflected neutrons is approximately equal to the incidence angle. The measured reflection probability was equal to ~30% within the detector angular size that corresponds to 40-50% total calculated probability of quasi-specular reflection.
  • We present a method to measure the resonance transitions between the gravitationally bound quantum states of neutrons in the GRANIT spectrometer. The purpose of GRANIT is to improve the accuracy of measurement of the quantum states parameters by several orders of magnitude, taking advantage of long storage of Ultracold neutrons at specula trajectories. The transitions could be excited using a periodic spatial variation of a magnetic field gradient. If the frequency of such a perturbation (in the frame of a moving neutron) coincides with a resonance frequency defined by the energy difference of two quantum states, the transition probability will sharply increase. The GRANIT experiment is motivated by searches for short-range interactions (in particular spin-dependent interactions), by studying the interaction of a quantum system with a gravitational field, by searches for extensions of the Standard model, by the unique possibility to check the equivalence principle for an object in a quantum state and by studying various quantum optics phenomena.
  • We report on storage of Very Cold Neutrons (VCN) in a trap with walls containing powder of diamond nanoparticles. The efficient VCN reflection is provided by multiple diffusive elastic scattering of VCN at single nanoparticles in powder. The VCN storage times are sufficiently long for accumulating large density of neutrons with complete VCN energy range of up to a few times 10(-4) eV. Methods for further improvements of VCN storage times are discussed.
  • We propose a method for observation of the quasi-stationary states of neutrons, localized near the curved mirror surface. The bounding effective well is formed by the centrifugal potential and the mirror Fermi-potential. This phenomenon is an example of an exactly solvable "quantum bouncer" problem that could be studied experimentally. It could provide a promising tool for studying fundamental neutron-matter interactions, as well as quantum neutron optics and surface physics effects. We develop formalism, which describes quantitatively the neutron motion near the mirror surface. The effects of mirror roughness are taken into account.
  • We study possibility of efficient reflection of very cold neutrons (VCN) from powders of nanoparticles. In particular, we measured the scattering of VCN at a powder of diamond nanoparticles as a function of powder sample thickness, neutron velocity and scattering angle. We observed extremely intense scattering of VCN even off thin powder samples. This agrees qualitatively with the model of independent nanoparticles at rest. We show that this intense scattering would allow us to use nanoparticle powders very efficiently as the very first reflectors for neutrons with energies within a complete VCN range up to $10^{-4}$ eV.
  • Ultracold and very cold neutrons (UCN and VCN) interact strongly with nanoparticles due to the similarity of their wavelengths and nanoparticles sizes. We analyze the hypothesis that this interaction can provide efficient cooling of neutrons by ultracold nanoparticles at certain experimental conditions, thus increasing the density of UCN by many orders of magnitude. The present analytical and numerical description of the problem is limited to the model of independent nanoparticles at zero temperature. Constraints of application of this model are discussed.
  • The available data on neutron scattering were analyzed to constrain a hypothetical new short-range interaction. We show that these constraints are several orders of magnitude better than those usually cited in the range between 1 pm and 5 nm. This distance range occupies an intermediate space between collider searches for strongly coupled heavy bosons and searches for new weak macroscopic forces. We emphasise the reliability of the neutron constraints in so far as they provide several independent strategies. We have identified the most promising way to improve them.
  • We describe measurements of the parity-violating (P-odd) triton emission asymmetry coefficient in the 6Li(n,alfa)3H reaction with polarised cold neutrons. Experiments were carried out at the Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (Gatchina, Russia) and at the Institut Laue-Langevin (Grenoble, France). We employed an ionisation chamber in a configuration allowing us to suppress the left-right asymmetry well below 10^(-8). A test for a false asymmetry due to eventual target impurities ("zero test") resulted in the value (0.0+-0.5)x10^(-8). As final result we obtained P-odd effect (-8.6+-2.0)x10^(-8).
  • We present the status of the development of a dedicated high density ultra-cold neutron (UCN) source dedicated to the gravitational spectrometer GRANIT. The source employs superthermal conversion of cold neutrons to UCN in superfluid helium. Tests have shown that UCN produced inside the liquid can be extracted into vacuum. Furthermore a dedicated neutron selection channel was tested to maintain high initial density and extract only neutrons with a vertical velocity component 20 cm/s for the spectrometer. This new source would have a phase-space density of 0.18 cm-3(m/s)-3 for the spectrometer.
  • We present a first experimental demonstration of a new method to extract a well-collimated beam of ultra-cold neutrons (UCN) from a storage vessel. Neutrons with too large divergence are not removed from the beam by an absorbing collimation, but a diffuse or semidiffuse channel with high Fermi potential reflects them back into the vessel. This avoids unnecessary losses and keeps the storage time high, which may be beneficial when the vessel is part of a UCN source with long buildup time of a high UCN density.
  • Spontaneous emission of graviton rates for the quantum bouncer states are evaluated.
  • We report on current efforts to detect the thermal and dissipative contributions to the Casimir force. For the thermal component, two experiments are in progress at Dartmouth and at the Institute Laue Langevin in Grenoble. The first experiment will seek to detect the Casimir force at the largest explorable distance using a cylinder-plane geometry which offers various advantages with respect to both sphere-plane and parallel-plane geometries. In the second experiment, the Casimir force in the parallel-plane configuration is measured with a dedicated torsional balance, up to 10 micrometers. Parallelism of large surfaces, critical in this configuration, is maintained through the use of inclinometer technology already implemented at Grenoble for the study of gravitationally bound states of ultracold neutrons, For the dissipative component of the Casimir force, we discuss detection techniques based upon the use of hyperfine spectroscopy of ultracold atoms and Rydberg atoms. Although quite challenging, this triad of experimental efforts, if successful, will give us a better knowledge of the interplay between quantum and thermal fluctuations of the electromagnetic field and of the nature of dissipation induced by the motion of objects in a quantum vacuum.
  • We discuss a proposal to measure the Casimir force in the parallel plate configuration in the $1-10\mu$m range via a high-sensitivity torsional balance. This will allow to measure the thermal contribution to the Casimir force therefore discriminating between the various approaches discussed so far. The accurate control of the Casimir force in this range of distances is also required to improve the limits to the existence of non-Newtonian forces in the micrometer range predicted by unification models of fundamental interactions.