• We report an accelerated laser phase diffusion quantum entropy source with all non-laser optical and optoelectronic elements implemented in silicon photonics. The device uses efficient and robust single-laser accelerated phase diffusion methods, and implements the whole quantum entropy source scheme including an unbalanced Mach-Zehnder interferometer with optimized splitting ratio, in a 0.5 mmx1 mm footprint. We demonstrate Gbps raw entropy-generation rates in a technology compatible with conventional CMOS fabrication techniques.
  • A dielectric multilayer platform has been investigated as a foundation for two-dimensional optics. In this paper, we present, to the best of our knowledge, the first experimental demonstration of absorption of Bloch surface waves in the presence of graphene layers. Graphene layers have been grown previously via CVD on Cu foils and transferred layer by layer by PMMA-wet transfer method. We exploit total internal reflection configuration and multi-heterodyne scanning near-field optical microscopy as a far-field coupling method and near-field characterization tool, respectively. The absorption is quantified in terms of propagation lengths of Bloch surface waves. A significant drop (about 17 times shorter) in the propagation length of surface waves is observed in the presence of single layer of graphene.
  • Models of quantum systems on curved space-times lack sufficient experimental verification. Some speculative theories suggest that quantum properties, such as entanglement, may exhibit entirely different behavior to purely classical systems. By measuring this effect or lack thereof, we can test the hypotheses behind several such models. For instance, as predicted by Ralph and coworkers [T C Ralph, G J Milburn, and T Downes, Phys. Rev. A, 79(2):22121, 2009, T C Ralph and J Pienaar, New Journal of Physics, 16(8):85008, 2014], a bipartite entangled system could decohere if each particle traversed through a different gravitational field gradient. We propose to study this effect in a ground to space uplink scenario. We extend the above theoretical predictions of Ralph and coworkers and discuss the scientific consequences of detecting/failing to detect the predicted gravitational decoherence. We present a detailed mission design of the European Space Agency's (ESA) Space QUEST (Space - Quantum Entanglement Space Test) mission, and study the feasibility of the mission schema.
  • Random number generators are essential to ensure performance in information technologies, including cryptography, stochastic simulations and massive data processing. The quality of random numbers ultimately determines the security and privacy that can be achieved, while the speed at which they can be generated poses limits to the utilisation of the available resources. In this work we propose and demonstrate a quantum entropy source for random number generation on an indium phosphide photonic integrated circuit made possible by a new design using two-laser interference and heterodyne detection. The resulting device offers high-speed operation with unprecedented security guarantees and reduced form factor. It is also compatible with complementary metal-oxide semiconductor technology, opening the path to its integration in computation and communication electronic cards, which is particularly relevant for the intensive migration of information processing and storage tasks from local premises to cloud data centres.
  • Mid-infrared (mid-IR) photo-detection has been recently growing in importance because of its multiple applications, including vibrational spectroscopy and thermal imaging. We propose and demonstrate a novel pyro-resistive photo-detection platform that combines a ferroelectric substrate (a z-cut LiNbO3 crystal) and a graphene layer transferred on top of its surface with electrical connections. Upon strong light absorption in the LiNbO3 substrate and the subsequent temperature increase, via the pyroelectric effect, polarization (bound) charges form at the crystal surface. These causes doping into graphene which in turn changes its carrier density and conductivity. In this way, by monitoring the graphene electrical resistance one can measure the incident optical power. . Detectivities of about 10^5 cm sqrt(Hz)/W in the 6 to 10 microns wavelength region are demonstrated.We explain the underlying physical mechanism of the pyro-resistive photo-detection and propose a model that reproduces accurately the experimental results. We also show that up to two orders of magnitude larger detectivity can be achieved by optimising the geometry and operating in vacuum, thus opening the path to a new class of mid-IR photo-detectors that can challenge classical HgCdTe devices, especially in real applications where cooling is to be avoided and low cost is crucial.
  • We present a loophole-free violation of local realism using entangled photon pairs. We ensure that all relevant events in our Bell test are spacelike separated by placing the parties far enough apart and by using fast random number generators and high-speed polarization measurements. A high-quality polarization-entangled source of photons, combined with high-efficiency, low-noise, single-photon detectors, allows us to make measurements without requiring any fair-sampling assumptions. Using a hypothesis test, we compute p-values as small as $5.9\times 10^{-9}$ for our Bell violation while maintaining the spacelike separation of our events. We estimate the degree to which a local realistic system could predict our measurement choices. Accounting for this predictability, our smallest adjusted p-value is $2.3 \times 10^{-7}$. We therefore reject the hypothesis that local realism governs our experiment.
  • We examine the ultrafast optical response of the crystalline and amorphous phases of the phase change material Ge$_2$Sb$_2$Te$_5$ below the phase transformation threshold. Simultaneous measurement of the transmissivity and reflectivity of thin film samples yields the time-dependent evolution of the dielectric function for both phases. We then identify how lattice motion and electronic excitation manifest in the dielectric response. The dielectric response of both phases is large but markedly different. At 800 nm, the changes in amorphous GST are well described by the Drude response of the generated photo-carriers, whereas the crystalline phase is better described by the depopulation of resonant bonds. We find that the generated coherent phonons have a greater influence in the amorphous phase than the crystalline phase. Furthermore, coherent phonons do not influence resonant bonding. For fluences up to 50% of the transformation threshold, the structure does not exhibit bond softening in either phase, enabling large changes of the optical properties without structural modification.
  • Local realism is the worldview in which physical properties of objects exist independently of measurement and where physical influences cannot travel faster than the speed of light. Bell's theorem states that this worldview is incompatible with the predictions of quantum mechanics, as is expressed in Bell's inequalities. Previous experiments convincingly supported the quantum predictions. Yet, every experiment requires assumptions that provide loopholes for a local realist explanation. Here we report a Bell test that closes the most significant of these loopholes simultaneously. Using a well-optimized source of entangled photons, rapid setting generation, and highly efficient superconducting detectors, we observe a violation of a Bell inequality with high statistical significance. The purely statistical probability of our results to occur under local realism does not exceed $3.74 \times 10^{-31}$, corresponding to an 11.5 standard deviation effect.
  • We demonstrate extraction of randomness from spontaneous-emission events less than 36 ns in the past, giving output bits with excess predictability below $10^{-5}$ and strong metrological randomness assurances. This randomness generation strategy satisfies the stringent requirements for unpredictable basis choices in current "loophole-free Bell tests" of local realism [Hensen et al., Nature (London) 526, 682 (2015); Giustina et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 250401 (2015); Shalm et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 250402 (2015)].
  • The functionalities of a wide range of optical and opto-electronic devices are based on resonance effects and active tuning of the amplitude and wavelength response is often essential. Plasmonic nanostructures are an efficient way to create optical resonances, a prominent example is the extraordinary optical transmission (EOT) through arrays of nanoholes patterned in a metallic film. Tuning of resonances by heating, applying electrical or optical signals has proven to be more elusive, due to the lack of materials that can induce modulation over a broad spectral range and/or at high speeds. Here we show that nanopatterned metals combined with phase change materials (PCMs) can overcome this limitation due to the large change in optical constants which can be induced thermally or on an ultrafast timescale. We demonstrate resonance wavelength shifts as large as 385 nm - an order of magnitude higher than previously reported - by combining properly designed Au EOT nanostructures with Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST). Moreover, we show, through pump probe measurements, repeatable and reversible, large amplitude modulations in the resonances, especially at telecommunication wavelengths, over ps time scales and at powers far below those needed to produce a permanent phase transition. Our findings open a pathway to the design of hybrid metal PCM nanostructures with ultrafast and widely tuneable resonance responses, which hold potential impact on active nanophotonic devices such as tuneable optical filters, smart windows, biosensors and reconfigurable memories.
  • We introduce a new image cytometer design for detection of very small particulate and demonstrate its capability in water analysis. The device is a compact microscope composed of off the shelf components, such as a light emitting diode (LED) source, a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) image sensor, and a specific combination of optical lenses that allow, through an appropriate software, Fourier transform processing of the sample volume. Waterborne microorganisms, such as Escherichia coli (E. coli), Legionella pneumophila (L. pneumophila) and Phytoplankton, are detected by interrogating the volume sample either in a fluorescent or label-free mode, i.e. with or without fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) molecules attached to the micro-organisms, respectively. We achieve a sensitivity of 50 cells/ml, which can be further increased to 0.2 cells/ml by preconcentrating an initial sample volume of 500 ml with an adhoc fluidic system. We also prove the capability of the proposed image cytometer of differentiating microbiological populations by size with a resolution of 3 um and of operating in real contaminated water.
  • Opto-electronic devices utilizing graphene have already demonstrated unique capabilities, which are much more difficult to realize with conventional technologies. However, the requirements in terms of material quality and uniformity are very demanding. A major roadblock towards high-performance devices are the nanoscale variations of graphene properties, which strongly impact the macroscopic device behaviour. Here, we present and apply opto-electronic nanoscopy to measure locally both the optical and electronic properties of graphene devices. This is achieved by combining scanning near-field infrared nanoscopy with electrical device read-out, allowing infrared photocurrent mapping at length scales of tens of nanometers. We apply this technique to study the impact of edges and grain boundaries on spatial carrier density profiles and local thermoelectric properties. Moreover, we show that the technique can also be applied to encapsulated graphene/hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) devices, where we observe strong charge build-up near the edges, and also address a device solution to this problem. The technique enables nanoscale characterization for a broad range of common graphene devices without the need of special device architectures or invasive graphene treatment.
  • The extreme electro-optical contrast between crystalline and amorphous states in phase change materials is routinely exploited in optical data storage and future applications include universal memories, flexible displays, reconfigurable optical circuits, and logic devices. Optical contrast is believed to arise due to a change in crystallinity. Here we show that the connection between optical properties and structure can be broken. Using a unique combination of single-shot femtosecond electron diffraction and optical spectroscopy, we simultaneously follow the lattice dynamics and dielectric function in the phase change material Ge2Sb2Te5 during an irreversible state transformation. The dielectric function changes by 30% within 100 femtoseconds due to a rapid depletion of electrons from resonantly-bonded states. This occurs without perturbing the crystallinity of the lattice, which heats with a 2 ps time constant. The optical changes are an order-of-magnitude larger than those achievable with silicon and present new routes to manipulate light on an ultrafast timescale without structural changes.
  • We demonstrate the coherent frequency conversion of structured light, optical beams in which the phase varies in each point of the transverse plane, from the near infrared (803nm) to the visible (527nm). The frequency conversion process makes use of sum-frequency generation in a periodically poled lithium niobate (ppLN) crystal with the help of a 1540-nm Gaussian pump beam. We perform far-field intensity measurements of the frequency-converted field, and verify the sought-after transformation of the characteristic intensity and phase profiles for various input modes. The coherence of the frequency-conversion process is confirmed using a mode-projection technique with a phase mask and a single-mode fiber. The presented results could be of great relevance to novel applications in high-resolution microscopy and quantum information processing.
  • Infrared spectroscopy is the technique of choice for chemical identification of biomolecules through their vibrational fingerprints. However, infrared light interacts poorly with nanometric size molecules. Here, we exploit the unique electro-optical properties of graphene to demonstrate a high-sensitivity tunable plasmonic biosensor for chemically-specific label-free detection of protein monolayers. The plasmon resonance of nanostructured graphene is dynamically tuned to selectively probe the protein at different frequencies and extract its complex refractive index. Additionally, the extreme spatial light confinement in graphene, up to two orders of magnitude higher than in metals, produces an unprecedentedly high overlap with nanometric biomolecules, enabling superior sensitivity in the detection of their refractive index and vibrational fingerprints. The combination of tunable spectral selectivity and enhanced sensitivity of graphene opens exciting prospects for biosensing.
  • Fast modulation and switching of light at visible and near-infrared (vis-NIR) frequencies is of utmost importance for optical signal processing and sensing technologies. No fundamental limit appears to prevent us from designing wavelength-sized devices capable of controlling the light phase and intensity at gigaherts (and even terahertz) speeds in those spectral ranges. However, this problem remains largely unsolved, despite recent advances in the use of quantum wells and phase-change materials for that purpose. Here, we explore an alternative solution based upon the remarkable electro-optical properties of graphene. In particular, we predict unity-order changes in the transmission and absorption of vis-NIR light produced upon electrical doping of graphene sheets coupled to realistically engineered optical cavities. The light intensity is enhanced at the graphene plane, and so is its absorption, which can be switched and modulated via Pauli blocking through varying the level of doping. Specifically, we explore dielectric planar cavities operating under either tunneling or Fabry-Perot resonant transmission conditions, as well as Mie modes in silicon nanospheres and lattice resonances in metal particle arrays. Our simulations reveal absolute variations in transmission exceeding 90% as well as an extinction ratio >15 dB with small insertion losses using feasible material parameters, thus supporting the application of graphene in fast electro-optics at vis-NIR frequencies.
  • We demonstrate experimentally a scheme to measure small temporal delays, much smaller than the pulse width, between optical pulses. Specifically, we observe an interference effect, based on the concepts of quantum weak measurements and weak value amplification, through which a sub-pulsewidth temporal delay between two femtosecond pulses induces a measurable shift of the central frequency of the pulse. The amount of frequency shift, and the accompanying losses of the measurement, can be tailored by post-selecting different states of polarization. Our scheme requires only spectrum measurements and linear optics elements, hence greatly facilitating its implementation. Thus it appears as a promising technique for measuring small and rapidly varying temporal delays.
  • We demonstrate a compact, robust, and highly efficient source of polarization-entangled photons, based on linear bi-directional down-conversion in a novel 'folded sandwich' configuration. Bi-directionally pumping a single periodically poled KTiOPO$_4$ (ppKTP) crystal with a 405-nm laser diode, we generate entangled photon pairs at the non-degenerate wavelengths 784 nm (signal) and 839 nm (idler), and achieve an unprecedented detection rate of 11.8 kcps for 10.4 $\mu$W of pump power (1.1 million pairs / mW), in a 2.9-nm bandwidth, while maintaining a very high two-photon entanglement quality, with a Bell-state fidelity of $99.3\pm0.3$%.
  • We present a simple but highly efficient source of polarization-entangled photons based on spontaneous parametric down-conversion (SPDC) in bulk periodically poled potassium titanyl phosphate crystals (PPKTP) pumped by a 405 nm laser diode. Utilizing one of the highest available nonlinear coefficients in a non-degenerate, collinear type-0 phase-matching configuration, we generate polarization entanglement via the crossed-crystal scheme and detect 0.64 million photon pair events/s/mW, while maintaining an overlap fidelity with the ideal Bell state of 0.98 at a pump power of 0.025 mW.
  • Signal state preparation in quantum key distribution schemes can be realized using either an active or a passive source. Passive sources might be valuable in some scenarios; for instance, in those experimental setups operating at high transmission rates, since no externally driven element is required. Typical passive transmitters involve parametric down-conversion. More recently, it has been shown that phase-randomized coherent pulses also allow passive generation of decoy states and Bennett-Brassard 1984 (BB84) polarization signals, though the combination of both setups in a single passive source is cumbersome. In this paper, we present a complete passive transmitter that prepares decoy-state BB84 signals using coherent light. Our method employs sum-frequency generation together with linear optical components and classical photodetectors. In the asymptotic limit of an infinite long experiment, the resulting secret key rate (per pulse) is comparable to the one delivered by an active decoy-state BB84 setup with an infinite number of decoy settings.
  • The European Space Agency (ESA) has supported a range of studies in the field of quantum physics and quantum information science in space for several years, and consequently we have submitted the mission proposal Space-QUEST (Quantum Entanglement for Space Experiments) to the European Life and Physical Sciences in Space Program. We propose to perform space-to-ground quantum communication tests from the International Space Station (ISS). We present the proposed experiments in space as well as the design of a space based quantum communication payload.