• We obtain two types of results on positive scalar curvature metrics for compact spin manifolds that are even dimensional. The first type of result are obstructions to the existence of positive scalar curvature metrics on such manifolds, expressed in terms of end-periodic eta invariants that were defined by Mrowka-Ruberman-Saveliev (MRS). These results are the even dimensional analogs of the results by Higson-Roe. The second type of result studies the number of path components of the space of positive scalar curvature metrics modulo diffeomorphism for compact spin manifolds that are even dimensional, whenever this space is non-empty. These extend and refine certain results in Botvinnik-Gilkey and also MRS. End-periodic analogs of K-homology and bordism theory are defined and are utilised to prove many of our results.
  • We provide a manifestly topological classification scheme for generalised Weyl semimetals, in any spatial dimension and with arbitrary Weyl surfaces which may be non-trivially linked. The classification naturally incorporates that of Chern insulators. Our analysis refines, in a mathematically precise sense, some well-known 3D constructions to account for subtle but important global aspects of the topology of semimetals. Using a fundamental locality principle, we derive a generalized charge cancellation condition for the Weyl surface components. We analyse the bulk-boundary correspondence under a duality transformation, which reveals explicitly the topological nature of the resulting surface Fermi arcs. We also analyse the effect of moving Weyl points on the bulk and boundary topological semimetal invariants.
  • For G an almost-connected Lie group, we study G-equivariant index theory for proper co-compact actions with various applications, including obstructions to and existence of G-invariant Riemannian metrics of positive scalar curvature. We prove a rigidity result for almost-complex manifolds, generalising Hattori's results, and an analogue of Petrie's conjecture. When G is an almost-connected Lie group or a discrete group, we establish Poincare duality between G-equivariant K-homology and K-theory, observing that Poincare duality does not necessarily hold for general G.
  • In earlier papers, we introduced spherical T-duality, which relates pairs of the form $(P,H)$ consisting of an oriented $S^3$-bundle $P\rightarrow M$ and a 7-cocycle $H$ on $P$ called the 7-flux. Intuitively, the spherical T-dual is another such pair $(\hat P, \hat H)$ and spherical T-duality exchanges the 7-flux with the Euler class, upon fixing the Pontryagin class and the second Stiefel-Whitney class. Unless $\mathrm{dim}(M)\leq 4$, not all pairs admit spherical T-duals and the spherical T-duals are not always unique. In this paper, we define a canonical Poincar\'e virtual line bundle $\mathcal{P}$ on $S^3 \times S^3$ (actually also for $S^n\times S^n$) and the spherical Fourier-Mukai transform, which implements a degree shifting isomorphism in K-theory on the trivial $S^3$-bundle. This is then used to prove that all spherical T-dualities induce natural degree-shifting isomorphisms between the 7-twisted K-theories of the pairs $(P,H)$ and $(\hat P, \hat H)$ when $\mathrm{dim}(M)\leq 4$, improving our earlier results.
  • We report on the modification of drag by neutrally buoyant spherical particles in highly turbulent Taylor-Couette flow. These particles can be used to disentangle the effects of size, deformability, and volume fraction on the drag, when contrasted with the drag for bubbly flows. We find that rigid spheres hardly change the drag of the system beyond the trivial viscosity effects caused by replacing the working fluid with particles. The size of the particle has a marginal effect on the drag, with smaller diameter particles showing only slightly lower drag. Increasing the particle volume fraction shows a net drag increase as the effective viscosity of the fluid is also increased. The increase in drag for increasing particle volume fraction is corroborated by performing laser Doppler anemometry where we find that the turbulent velocity fluctuations also increase with increasing volume fraction. In contrast with rigid spheres, for bubbles the effective drag reduction also increases with increasing Reynolds number. Bubbles are also much more effective in reducing the overall drag.
  • The possible transition to the so-called ultimate regime, wherein both the bulk and the boundary layers are turbulent, has been an outstanding issue in thermal convection, since the seminal work by Kraichnan [Phys. Fluids 5, 1374 (1962)]. Yet, when this transition takes place and how the local flow induces it is not fully understood. Here, by performing two-dimensional simulations of Rayleigh-B\'enard turbulence covering six decades in Rayleigh number Ra up to $10^{14}$ for Prandtl number Pr $=1$, for the first time in numerical simulations we find the transition to the ultimate regime, namely at $\textrm{Ra}^*=10^{13}$. We reveal how the emission of thermal plumes enhances the global heat transport, leading to a steeper increase of the Nusselt number than the classical Malkus scaling $\textrm{Nu} \sim \textrm{Ra}^{1/3}$ [Proc. R. Soc. London A 225, 196 (1954)]. Beyond the transition, the mean velocity profiles are logarithmic throughout, indicating turbulent boundary layers. In contrast, the temperature profiles are only locally logarithmic, namely within the regions where plumes are emitted, and where the local Nusselt number has an effective scaling $\textrm{Nu} \sim \textrm{Ra}^{0.38}$, corresponding to the effective scaling in the ultimate regime.
  • We study topological phases in the hyperbolic plane using noncommutative geometry and T-duality, and show that fractional versions of the quantised indices for integer, spin and anomalous quantum Hall effects can result. Generalising models used in the Euclidean setting, a model for the bulk-boundary correspondence of fractional indices is proposed, guided by the geometry of hyperbolic boundaries.
  • We present results on the global and local characterisation of heat transport in homogeneous bubbly flow. Experimental measurements were performed with and without the injection of $\sim 2.5$ mm diameter bubbles (corresponding to $Re_b \approx 600$) in a rectangular water column heated from one side and cooled from the other. The gas volume fraction $\alpha$ was varied in the range $0\% - 5\%$, and the Rayleigh number $Ra_H$ in the range $4.0 \times 10^9 - 1.2 \times 10^{11}$. We find that the global heat transfer is enhanced up to 20 times due to bubble injection. Interestingly, for bubbly flow, for our lowest concentration $\alpha = 0.5\% $ onwards, the Nusselt number $\overline{Nu}$ is nearly independent of $Ra_H$, and depends solely on the gas volume fraction~$\alpha$. We observe the scaling $\overline{Nu} \propto \alpha^{0.45}$, which is suggestive of a diffusive transport mechanism. Through local temperature measurements, we show that the bubbles induce a huge increase in the strength of liquid temperature fluctuations, e.g. by a factor of 200 for $\alpha = 0.9\%$. Further, we compare the power spectra of the temperature fluctuations for the single- and two-phase cases. In the single-phase cases, most of the spectral power of the temperature fluctuations is concentrated in the large-scale rolls. However, with the injection of bubbles, we observe intense fluctuations over a wide range of scales, extending up to very high frequencies. Thus, while in the single-phase flow the thermal boundary layers control the heat transport, once the bubbles are injected, the bubble-induced liquid agitation governs the process from a very small bubble concentration onwards.
  • Bubbles play an important role in the transport of chemicals and nutrients in many natural and industrial flows. Their dispersion is crucial to understand the mixing processes in these flows. Here we report on the dispersion of millimetric air bubbles in a homogeneous and isotropic turbulent flow with Reynolds number $\text{Re}_\lambda \in [110,310]$. We find that the mean squared displacement (MSD) of the bubbles far exceeds that of fluid tracers in turbulence. The MSD shows two regimes. At short times, it grows ballistically ($\propto \tau^2$), while at larger times, it approaches the diffusive regime where MSD $\propto \tau$. Strikingly, for the bubbles, the ballistic-to-diffusive transition occurs one decade earlier than for the fluid. We reveal that both the enhanced dispersion and the early transition to the diffusive regime can be traced back to the unsteady wake-induced-motions of the bubbles. Further, the diffusion transition for bubbles is not set by the integral time scale of the turbulence (as it is for fluid tracers and microbubbles), but instead, by a timescale of eddy-crossing of the rising bubbles. The present findings provide a Lagrangian perspective towards understanding the mixing in turbulent bubbly flows.
  • In this combined experimental and numerical study on thermally driven turbulence in a rectangular cell, the global heat transport and the coherent flow structures are controlled with an asymmetric ratchet-like roughness on the top and bottom plates. We show that, by means of symmetry breaking due to the presence of the ratchet structures on the conducting plates, the orientation of the Large Scale Circulation Roll (LSCR) can be locked to a preferred direction even when the cell is perfectly leveled out. By introducing a small tilt to the system, we show that the LSCR orientation can be tuned and controlled. The two different orientations of LSCR give two quite different heat transport efficiencies, indicating that heat transport is sensitive to the LSCR direction over the asymmetric roughness structure. Through a quantitative analysis of the dynamics of thermal plume emissions and the orientation of the LSCR over the asymmetric structure, we provide a physical explanation for these findings. The current work has important implications for passive and active flow control in engineering, bio-fluid dynamics, and geophysical flows.
  • Given a constant magnetic field on Euclidean space ${\mathbb R}^p$ determined by a skew-symmetric $(p\times p)$ matrix $\Theta$, and a ${\mathbb Z}^p$-invariant probability measure $\mu$ on the disorder set $\Sigma$ which is by hypothesis a Cantor set where the action is assumed to be minimal, we conjecture that the corresponding Integrated Density of States of any self-adjoint operator affiliated to the twisted crossed product algebra $C(\Sigma) \rtimes_\sigma {\mathbb Z}^p$ takes on values on spectral gaps in an explicit ${\mathbb Z}$-module involving Pfaffians of $\Theta$ and its sub-matrices that we describe, where $\sigma$ is the multiplier on ${\mathbb Z}^p$ associated to $\Theta$. We give evidence for the validity of our conjecture in 2D, 3D, the Jordan block diagonal case and the periodic case in all dimensions.
  • We report on an experimental study of the vertical impact of a concave nosed axisymmetric body on a free surface. Previous studies have shown that bodies with a convex nose, like a sphere, produce a well defined splash with a relatively large cavity behind the model. In contrast, we find that with a concave nose, there is hardly a splash and the cavity extent is greatly reduced. This may be explained by the fact that in the concave nosed case, the initial impact is between a confined air pocket and the free surface unlike in the convex nosed case. From measurements of the unsteady pressure in the concave nose portion, we show that in this case, the maximum pressures are significantly lower than the classically expected "water hammer" pressures and also lower than those generally measured on other geometries. Thus, the presence of an air pocket in the case of a concave nosed body adds an interesting dimension to the classical problem of impact of solid bodies on to a free surface.
  • In this Letter, we study the motion and wake-patterns of freely rising and falling cylinders in quiescent fluid. We show that the amplitude of oscillation and the overall system-dynamics are intricately linked to two parameters: the particle's mass-density relative to the fluid $m^* \equiv \rho_p/\rho_f$ and its relative moment-of-inertia $I^* \equiv {I}_p/{I}_f$. This supersedes the current understanding that a critical mass density ($m^*\approx$ 0.54) alone triggers the sudden onset of vigorous vibrations. Using over 144 combinations of ${m}^*$ and $I^*$, we comprehensively map out the parameter space covering very heavy ($m^* > 10$) to very buoyant ($m^* < 0.1$) particles. The entire data collapses into two scaling regimes demarcated by a transitional Strouhal number, $St_t \approx 0.17$. $St_t$ separates a mass-dominated regime from a regime dominated by the particle's moment of inertia. A shift from one regime to the other also marks a gradual transition in the wake-shedding pattern: from the classical $2S$~(2-Single) vortex mode to a $2P$~(2-Pairs) vortex mode. Thus, auto-rotation can have a significant influence on the trajectories and wakes of freely rising isotropic bodies.
  • This work reports an experimental characterisation of the flow properties in a homogeneous bubble swarm rising at high-Reynolds-numbers within a homogeneous and isotropic turbulent flow. Both the gas volume fraction {\alpha} and the velocity fluctuations of the carrier flow before bubble injection are varied, respectively, in the ranges 0% < alpha < 0.93% and 2.3 cm/s < urms < 5.5 cm/s. The so-called bubblance parameter is used to compare the ratio of the kinetic energy generated by the bubbles to the one produced by the incident turbulence, and is varied from 0 to 1.3. Conditional measurements of the velocity field downstream of the bubbles in the vertical direction allow us to disentangle three regions that have specific statistical properties, namely the primary wake, the secondary wake and the far field. While the fluctuations in the primary wake are similar to the one of a single bubble rising in a liquid at rest, the statistics of the velocity fluctuations in the far field follow Gaussian distribution, similar to the one produced by the homogenous and isotropic turbulence at the largest scales. In the secondary wake region, the conditional probability density function (pdf) of the velocity fluctuations is asymmetric and shows an exponential tail for the positive fluctuations and a Gaussian one for the negative fluctuations. The overall agitation thus results from the combination of these three contributions and depends mainly on the bubblance parameter.
  • The subtle interplay between local and global charges for topological semimetals exactly parallels that for singular vector fields. Part of this story is the relationship between cohomological semimetal invariants, Euler structures, and ambiguities in the torsion of manifolds. Dually, a topological semimetal can be represented by Euler chains from which its surface Fermi arc connectivity can be deduced. These dual pictures, and the link to topological invariants of insulators, are organised using geometric exact sequences. We go beyond Dirac-type Hamiltonians and introduce new classes of semimetals whose local charges are subtle Atiyah-Dupont-Thomas invariants globally constrained by the Kervaire semicharacteristic, leading to the prediction of torsion Fermi arcs.
  • This paper explores further the connection between Langlands duality and T-duality for compact simple Lie groups, which appeared in work of Daenzer-Van Erp and Bunke-Nikolaus. We show that Langlands duality gives rise to isomorphisms of twisted K-groups, but that these K-groups are trivial except in the simplest case of SU(2) and SO(3). Along the way we compute explicitly the map on $H^3$ induced by a covering of compact simple Lie groups, which is either 1 or 2 depending in a complicated way on the type of the groups involved. We also give a new method for computing twisted K-theory using the Segal spectral sequence, giving simpler computations of certain twisted K-theory groups of compact Lie groups relevant for D-brane charges in WZW theories and rank-level dualities. Finally we study a duality for orientifolds based on complex Lie groups with an involution.
  • We study the geometry and topology of (filtered) algebra-bundles ${\bf\Psi}^{\mathbb Z}$ over a smooth manifold $X$ with typical fibre $\Psi^{\mathbb Z}(Z; V)$, the algebra of classical pseudodifferential operators of integral order on the compact manifold $Z$ acting on smooth sections of a vector bundle $V$. First a theorem of Duistermaat and Singer is generalized to the assertion that the group of projective invertible Fourier integral operators ${\rm PGL}({\mathcal F}^\bullet(Z; V))$, is precisely the automorphism group, ${\rm Aut}(\Psi^{\mathbb Z}(Z; V)),$ of the filtered algebra of pseudodifferential operators. We replace some of the arguments in their paper by microlocal ones, thereby removing the topological assumption well as extending their result to sections of a vector bundle. We define a natural class of connections and B-fields the principal bundle to which ${\bf\Psi}^{\mathbb Z}$ is associated and obtain a de Rham representative of the Dixmier-Douady class, in terms of the outer derivation on the Lie algebra and the residue trace of Guillemin and Wodzicki; the resulting formula only depends on the formal symbol algebra ${\bf\Psi}^{\mathbb Z}/{\bf\Psi}^{-\infty}.$ Examples of pseudodifferential algebra bundles are given that are not associated to a finite dimensional fibre bundle over $X.$
  • We report on the Lagrangian statistics of acceleration of small (sub-Kolmogorov) bubbles and tracer particles with Stokes number St << 1 in turbulent flow. At decreasing Reynolds number, the bubble accelerations show deviations from that of tracer particles, i.e. they deviate from the Heisenberg-Yaglom prediction and show a quicker decorrelation despite their small size and minute St. Using direct numerical simulations, we show that these effects arise due the drift of these particles through the turbulent flow. We theoretically predict this gravity-driven effect for developed isotropic turbulence, with the ratio of Stokes to Froude number or equivalently the particle drift-velocity governing the enhancement of acceleration variance and the reductions in correlation time and intermittency. Our predictions are in good agreement with experimental and numerical results. The present findings are relevant to a range of scenarios encompassing tiny bubbles and droplets that drift through the turbulent oceans and the atmosphere. They also question the common usage of micro-bubbles and micro-droplets as tracers in turbulence research.
  • Recently we introduced T-duality in the study of topological insulators, and used it to show that T-duality trivialises the bulk-boundary correspondence in 2 dimensions. In this paper, we partially generalise these results to higher dimensions and briefly discuss the 4D quantum Hall effect.
  • We report experimental measurements of the translational and rotational dynamics of a large buoyant sphere in isotropic turbulence. We introduce an efficient method to simultaneously determine the position and (absolute) orientation of a spherical body from visual observation. The method employs a minimization algorithm to obtain the orientation from the 2D projection of a specific pattern drawn onto the surface of the sphere. This has the advantages that it does not require a database of reference images, is easily scalable using parallel processing, and enables accurate absolute orientation reference. Analysis of the sphere's translational dynamics reveals clear differences between the streamwise and transverse directions. The translational auto-correlations and PDFs provide evidence for periodicity in the particle's dynamics even under turbulent conditions. The angular autocorrelations show weak periodicity. The angular accelerations exhibit wide tails, however without a directional dependence.
  • Recently we introduced T-duality in the study of topological insulators. In this paper, we study the bulk-boundary correspondence for three phenomena in condensed matter physics, namely, the quantum Hall effect, the Chern insulator, and time reversal invariant topological insulators. In all of these cases, we show that T-duality trivializes the bulk-boundary correspondence.
  • We generalise Atiyah and Hirzebruch's vanishing theorem for actions by compact groups on compact Spin-manifolds to possibly noncompact groups acting properly and cocompactly on possibly noncompact Spin-manifolds. As corollaries, we obtain some vanishing results for $\hat A$-type genera.
  • We state a general conjecture that T-duality trivialises a model for the bulk-boundary correspondence in the parametrised context. We give evidence that it is valid by proving it in a special interesting case, which is relevant both to String Theory and to the study of topological insulators with defects in Condensed Matter Physics.
  • Particles suspended in turbulent flows are affected by the turbulence and at the same time act back on the flow. The resulting coupling can give rise to rich variability in their dynamics. Here we report experimental results from an investigation of finite-sized buoyant spheres in turbulence. We find that even a marginal reduction in the particle's density from that of the fluid can result in strong modification of its dynamics. In contrast to classical spatial filtering arguments and predictions of particle models, we find that the particle acceleration variance increases with size. We trace this reversed trend back to the growing contribution from wake-induced forces, unaccounted for in current particle models in turbulence. Our findings highlight the need for improved multi-physics based models that account for particle wake effects for a faithful representation of buoyant-sphere dynamics in turbulence.
  • Topological insulators and D-brane charges in string theory can both be classified by the same family of groups. In this paper, we extend this connection via a geometric transform, giving a novel duality of topological insulators which can be viewed as a condensed matter analog of T-duality in string theory. For 2D Chern insulators, this duality exchanges the rank and Chern number of the valence bands.