• We study the production of sterile neutrinos in supernovae, focusing in particular on the keV--MeV mass range, which is the most interesting range if sterile neutrinos are to account for the dark matter in the Universe. Focusing on the simplest scenario in which sterile neutrinos mixes only with muon or tau neutrino, we argue that the production of keV--MeV sterile neutrinos can be strongly enhanced by a Mikheyev--Smirnov--Wolfenstein (MSW) resonance, so that a substantial flux is expected to emerge from a supernova, even if vacuum mixing angles between active and sterile neutrinos are tiny. Using energetics arguments, this yields limits on the sterile neutrino parameter space that reach down to mixing angles of the order of $\sin^2 2\theta \lesssim 10^{-14}$ and are up to an order of magnitude stronger than those from X-ray observations. While supernova limits suffer from larger systematic uncertainties than X-ray limits they apply also to scenarios in which sterile neutrinos are not abundantly produced in the early Universe. We also compute the flux of $\mathcal{O}(\text{MeV})$ photons expected from the decay of sterile neutrinos produced in supernovae, but find that it is beyond current observational reach even for a nearby supernova.
  • Modern neutrino facilities will be able to detect a large number of neutrinos from the next Galactic supernova. We investigate the viability of the triangulation method to locate a core-collapse supernova by employing the neutrino arrival time differences at various detectors. We perform detailed numerical fits in order to determine the uncertainties of these time differences for the cases when the core collapses into a neutron star or a black hole. We provide a global picture by combining all the relevant current and future neutrino detectors. Our findings indicate that in the scenario of a neutron star formation, supernova can be located with precision of 1.5 and 3.5 degrees in declination and right ascension, respectively. For the black hole scenario, sub-degree precision can be reached.
  • We address the 5 MeV event excess in the measured antineutrino spectrum from nuclear reactors in a beyond the Standard model framework, a challenge which has not been met to date. We employ nonstandard neutrino interactions with baryons that can induce the reaction $^{13}$C$(\overline{\nu}, \overline{\nu}^\prime n)^{12}$C$^*$ in organic scintillator detectors. The de-excitation of $^{12}$C$^*$ yields a prompt $4.4$ MeV photon, while the thermalization of the product neutron causes proton recoils, which in turn yield an additional prompt energy contribution with finite width such that this process can mimic neutrinos at around 5 MeV energy. We find that the minimal viable model that could induce this reaction involves a sterile neutrino charged under an Abelian symmetry group. Such sterile neutrinos can simultaneously explain the discrepancy between the measured and predicted antineutrino fluxes at short-baseline reactor experiments.
  • A long time ago (in 2014), in galaxies and galaxy clusters far, far away, several groups have reported hints for a yet unidentified line in astrophysical X-ray signals at an energy of 3.5\,keV. While it is not unlikely that this line is simply a reflection of imperfectly modeled atomic transitions, it has renewed the community's interest in models of keV-scale dark matter, whose decay would lead to such a line. The alternative possibility of dark matter annihilation into monochromatic photons is far less explored, a lapse that we strive to amend in this paper. More precisely, we introduce a novel model of fermionic dark matter $\chi$ with $\mathcal{O}(\text{keV})$ mass, annihilating to a scalar state $\phi$ which in turn decays to photons, for instance via loops of heavy vector-like quarks. The resulting photon spectrum is box-shaped, but if $\chi$ and $\phi$ are nearly degenerate in mass, it can also resemble a narrow line. We discuss dark matter production via two different mechanisms -- misalignment and freeze-in -- which both turn out to be viable in vast regions of parameter space. We constrain the model using astrophysical X-ray data, and we demonstrate that, thanks to the velocity-dependence of the annihilation cross section, it has the potential to reconcile the various observations of the 3.5\,keV line. We finally address the $\phi$-mediated force between dark matter particles and its possible impact on structure formation.
  • We discuss novel ways in which neutrino oscillation experiments can probe dark matter. In particular, we focus on interactions between neutrinos and ultra-light ("fuzzy") dark matter particles with masses of order $10^{-22}$ eV. It has been shown previously that such dark matter candidates are phenomenologically successful and might help ameliorate the tension between predicted and observed small scale structures in the Universe. We argue that coherent forward scattering of neutrinos on fuzzy dark matter particles can significantly alter neutrino oscillation probabilities. These effects could be observable in current and future experiments. We set new limits on fuzzy dark matter interacting with neutrinos using T2K and solar neutrino data, and we estimate the sensitivity of reactor neutrino experiments and of future long-baseline accelerator experiments. These results are based on detailed simulations in GLoBES. We allow the dark matter particle to be either a scalar or a vector boson. In the latter case, we find potentially interesting connections to models addressing various $B$ physics anomalies.
  • Military and civilian applications of nuclear energy have left a significant amount of spent nuclear fuel over the past 70 years. Currently, in many countries world wide, the use of nuclear energy is on the rise. Therefore, the management of highly radioactive nuclear waste is a pressing issue. In this letter, we explore antineutrino detectors as a tool for monitoring and safeguarding nuclear waste material. We compute the flux and spectrum of antineutrinos emitted by spent nuclear fuel elements as a function of time, and we illustrate the usefulness of antineutrino detectors in several benchmark scenarios. In particular, we demonstrate how a measurement of the antineutrino flux can help to re-verify the contents of a dry storage cask in case the monitoring chain by conventional means gets disrupted. We then comment on the usefulness of antineutrino detectors at long-term storage facilities such as Yucca mountain. Finally, we put forward antineutrino detection as a tool in locating underground "hot spots" in contaminated areas such as the Hanford site in Washington state.
  • Many theories of dark matter (DM) predict that DM particles can be captured by stars via scattering on ordinary matter. They subsequently condense into a DM core close to the center of the star and eventually annihilate. In this work, we trace DM capture and annihilation rates throughout the life of a massive star and show that this evolution culminates in an intense annihilation burst coincident with the death of the star in a core collapse supernova. The reason is that, along with the stellar interior, also its DM core heats up and contracts, so that the DM density increases rapidly during the final stages of stellar evolution. We argue that, counterintuitively, the annihilation burst is more intense if DM annihilation is a $p$-wave process than for $s$-wave annihilation because in the former case, more DM particles survive until the supernova. If among the DM annihilation products are particles like dark photons that can escape the exploding star and decay to Standard Model particles later, the annihilation burst results in a flash of gamma rays accompanying the supernova. For a galactic supernova, this "dark gamma ray burst" may be observable in CTA.
  • The flavor composition of astrophysical neutrinos observed in neutrino telescopes is a powerful discriminator between different astrophysical neutrino production mechanisms and can also teach us about the particle physics properties of neutrinos. In this paper, we investigate how the possible existence of light sterile neutrinos can affect these flavor ratios. We consider two scenarios: (i) neutrino production in conventional astrophysical sources, followed by partial oscillation into sterile states; (ii) neutrinos from dark matter decay with a primary flavor composition enhanced in tau neutrinos or sterile neutrinos. Throughout the paper, we constrain the sterile neutrino mixing parameters from a full global fit to short and long baseline data. We present our results in the form of flavor triangles and, for scenario (ii), as exclusion limits on the dark matter mass and lifetime, derived from a fit to IceCube high energy starting events and through-going muons. We argue that identifying a possible flux of neutrinos from dark matter decay may require analyzing the flavor composition as a function of neutrino energy.
  • The observed pattern of neutrino mixing angles is in good agreement with the hypothesis of neutrino anarchy, which posits that Nature has chosen the entries of the leptonic mixing matrix at random. In this paper we investigate how stable this conclusion is under renormalization group effects. Working in the simplest type-I seesaw model and two variants of the inverse seesaw model we study how the statistical distributions of the neutrino mixing parameters evolve between the Grand Unification scale and the electroweak scale. Especially in the inverse seesaw case we find significant distortions: mixing angles tend to be smaller after RG running, and the Dirac CP phase tends to be closer to zero. The p-value describing the compatibility between the observed mixing angles and the anarchy hypothesis increases by 10-20%. This illustrates that RG effects are highly relevant for quantitative studies of the anarchy scenario.
  • We present radiative one-loop neutrino mass model with hypercharge zero scalar triplet in conjunction with another charged singlet scalar and an additional vectorlike lepton doublet. We study three variants of this mass model: the first one without additional beyond-SM symmetry, the second with imposed DM-stabilizing discrete Z_2 symmetry, and the third in which this Z_2 symmetry is promoted to the gauge symmetry U(1)_D. The two latter cases are scotogenic, with a neutral component of the scalar triplet as a dark matter candidate. In first scotogenic model the Z_2-odd dark matter candidate is at the multi-TeV mass scale, so that all new degrees of freedom are beyond the direct reach of the LHC. In second scotogenic setup, with broken U(1)_D symmetry the model may have LHC signatures or be relevant to astrophysical observations, depending on the scale of U(1)_D breaking.