• We describe a novel method for producing Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger states in cold atoms coupled to a superconducting coplanar cavity. In the proposed scheme, atoms interact between each other by virtual photon exchange via a cavity mode. These interactions cause an asymmetric Rydberg blockade mechanism that suppresses simultaneous excitations into different atomic Rydberg levels, thus forcing all atoms to occupy the same Rydberg state. This mechanism has effect even if the atoms are separated by distances of the order of millimeters. The atomic populations are transferred adiabatically from the ground state into the entangled state by following a collective dark state with low dissipation rates.
  • Based on the firm laws of physics rather than unproven foundations of mathematical complexity, quantum cryptography provides a radically different solution for encryption and promises unconditional security. Quantum cryptography systems are typically built between two nodes connected to each other through fiber optic. This chapter focuses on quantum cryptography systems operating over free-space optical channels as a cost-effective and license-free alternative to fiber optic counterparts. It provides an overview of the different parts of an experimental free-space quantum communication link developed in the Spanish National Research Council (Madrid, Spain).
  • Beam wander caused by atmospheric turbulence can significantly degrade the performance of horizontal free-space quantum communication links. Classical beam wander correction techniques cannot be applied due to the stronger requirements of transmitting single photons. One strategy to overcome this limitation consists in using a separate wavelength from that of the quantum signal to analyze the beam wander and use this information for its correction. For this strategy to work adequately, both wavelengths should be affected equally by atmospheric turbulence, i.e. no chromatic effects should be originated from beam wander. In this letter, a series of experiments are performed to prove that this is the case for {\lambda} ~ 850 nm as the quantum signal and {\lambda} ~ 1550 nm as the tracking signal of a quantum communication system.
  • High-speed free-space quantum key distribution located in urban environment offers an interesting alternative to public key encryption - whose security strength is yet to be mathematically proven. To achieve this, three main objectives need to be accomplished: both the emitter and receiver have to be capable of transmitting and receiving at high speed - with the selection of the source's wavelength and detectors being of especial importance - the error rate needs to be kept at a minimum, especially that due to solar background radiation; and finally, a fast automatic tracking system, capable of compensating for atmospheric turbulence effects, is needed. Regarding to sky background and atmospheric turbulence, two different tracking techniques involving the beam wander compensation in the emitter or the receiver are presented and one of them is selected for our system, based on the link propagation distance and the atmospheric turbulence regime.
  • Free-space quantum key distribution links in urban environment have demanding operating needs, such as functioning in daylight and under atmospheric turbulence, which can dramatically impact their performance. Both effects are usually mitigated with a careful design of the field of view of the receiver. However, a trade-off is often required, since a narrow field of view improves background noise rejection but it is linked to an increase in turbulence-related losses. In this paper, we present a high-speed automatic tracking system to overcome these limitations. Both a reduction in the field-of-view to decrease the background noise and the mitigation of the losses caused by atmospheric turbulence are addressed. Two different designs are presented and discussed, along with technical considerations for the experimental implementation. Finally, preliminary experimental results of beam wander correction are used to estimate the potential improvement of both the quantum bit error rate and secret key rate of a free space quantum key distribution system.
  • Chaotic cryptography is based on the properties of chaos as source of entropy. Many different schemes have been proposed to take advantage of those properties and to design new strategies to encrypt information. However, the right and efficient use of chaos in the context of cryptography requires a thorough knowledge about the dynamics of the selected chaotic system. Indeed, if the final encryption system reveals enough information about the underlying chaotic system it could be possible for a cryptanalyst to get the key, part of the key or some information somehow equivalent to the key just analyzing those dynamical properties leaked by the cryptosystem. This paper shows what those dynamical properties are and how a cryptanalyst can use them to prove the inadequacy of an encryption system for the secure exchange of information. This study is performed through the introduction of a series of mathematical tools which should be the basic framework of cryptanalysis in the context of digital chaos-based cryptography.
  • This paper analyzes the security of a recent cryptosystem based on the ergodicity property of chaotic maps. It is shown how to obtain the secret key using a chosen-ciphertext attack. Some other design weaknesses are also shown.
  • This paper analyzes the use of the logistic map for cryptographic applications. The most important characteristics of the logistic map are shown in order to prove the inconvenience of considering this map in the design of new chaotic cryptosystems.
  • This paper reports a detailed cryptanalysis of a recently proposed encryption scheme based on the logistic map. Some problems are emphasized concerning the key space definition and the implementation of the cryptosystem using floating-point operations. It is also shown how it is possible to reduce considerably the key space through a ciphertext-only attack. Moreover, a timing attack allows the estimation of part of the key due to the existent relationship between this part of the key and the encryption/decryption time. As a result, the main features of the cryptosystem do not satisfy the demands of secure communications. Some hints are offered to improve the cryptosystem under study according to those requirements.
  • We present the application of quantum key distribution technologies to fiber-based broadband passive optical access networks. This application is based on our 850 nm wavelength gigahertz clock-rate single-receiver system, is compatible with existing telecommunications fiber and exploits a wavelength band not currently utilized in access networks. The developed quantum key distribution networks are capable of transmitting over distances consistent with the span of access links for metropolitan networks (10 km), at clock frequencies ranging up to 3 GHz.
  • A quantum key distribution system has been developed, using standard telecommunications optical fiber, which is capable of operating at clock rates of greater than 1 GHz. The quantum key distribution system implements a polarization encoded version of the B92 protocol. The system employs vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers with emission wavelengths of 850 nm as weak coherent light sources, and silicon single photon avalanche diodes as the single photon detectors. A distributed feedback laser of emission wavelength 1.3 micro-metres, and a linear gain germanium avalanche photodiode was used to optically synchronize individual photons over the standard telecommunications fiber. The quantum key distribution system exhibited a quantum bit error rate of 1.4%, and an estimated net bit rate greater than 100,000 bits-per-second for a 4.2 km transmission range. For a 10 km fiber range a quantum bit error rate of 2.1%, and estimated net bit rate of greater than 7,000 bits-per-second was achieved.
  • In recent years quantum information research has lead to the discovery of a number of remarkable new paradigms for information processing and communication. These developments include quantum cryptography schemes that offer unconditionally secure information transport guaranteed by quantum-mechanical laws. Such potentially disruptive security technologies could be of high strategic and economic value in the future. Two major issues confronting researchers in this field are the transmission range (typically <100km) and the key exchange rate, which can be as low as a few bits per second at long optical fiber distances. This paper describes further research of an approach to significantly enhance the key exchange rate in an optical fiber system at distances in the range of 1-20km. We will present results on a number of application scenarios, including point-to-point links and multi-user networks. Quantum key distribution systems have been developed, which use standard telecommunications optical fiber, and which are capable of operating at clock rates of up to 2GHz. They implement a polarization-encoded version of the B92 protocol and employ vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers with emission wavelengths of 850 nm as weak coherent light sources, as well as silicon single-photon avalanche diodes as the single photon detectors. The point-to-point quantum key distribution system exhibited a quantum bit error rate of 1.4%, and an estimated net bit rate greater than 100,000 bits- per second for a 4.2 km transmission range.
  • A fibre-based quantum key distribution system operating up to a clock frequency of 3.3GHz is presented. The system demonstrates significantly increased key exchange rate potential and operates at a wavelength of 850nm.
  • Two multi-user approaches to fiber-based quantum key distribution systems operating at gigahertz clock frequencies are presented, both compatible with standard telecommunications fiber.