• Destructive quantum interference (DQI) in single molecule electronics is a purely quantum mechanical effect and entirely defined by inherent properties of the molecule in the junction such as its structure and symmetry. This definition of DQI by molecular properties alone suggests its relation to other more general concepts in chemistry as well as the possibility of deriving simple models for its understanding and molecular device design. Recently, two such models have gained wide spread attention, where one was a graphical scheme based on visually inspecting the connectivity of carbon sites in conjugated pi systems in an atomic orbital (AO) basis and the other one put the emphasis on the amplitudes and signs of the frontier molecular orbitals (MOs). There have been discussions on the range of applicability for these schemes, but ultimately conclusions from topological molecular Hamiltonians should not depend on whether they are drawn from an AO or a MO representation, as long as all the orbitals are taken into account. In this article we clarify the relation between both models in terms of the zeroth order Green's function and compare their predictions for a variety of systems. From this comparison we conclude that for a correct description of DQI from a MO perspective it is necessary to include the contributions from all MOs rather than just those from the frontier orbitals. The cases where DQI effects can be successfully predicted within a frontier orbital approximation we show to be limited to alternant even-membered hydrocarbons, as a a direct consequence of the Coulson-Rushbrooke pairing theorem in quantum chemistry.
  • Nonequilibrium Greens function techniques (NEGF) combined with density functional theory (DFT) calculations have become a standard tool for the description of electron transport through single molecule nanojunctions in the coherent tunneling regime. However, the applicability of these methods for transport in the Coulomb blockade regime is questionable. For a molecular assembly model, with multideterminant calculations as a benchmark, we show how a closed shell ansatz, the usual ingredient of meanfield methods, fails to properly describe the step like electron transfer characteristic in weakly coupled systems. Detailed analysis of this misbehavior allows us to propose a practical scheme to extract the addition energies in the CB regime for single-molecule junctions from NEGF DFT within the local density approximation (closed shell). We show also that electrostatic screening effects are taken into account within this simple approach.
  • In all theoretical treatments of electron transport through single molecules between two metal electrodes, a clear distinction has to be made between a coherent transport regime with a strong coupling throughout the junction and a Coulomb blockade regime in which the molecule is only weakly coupled to both leads. The former case where the tunnelling barrier is considered to be delocalized across the system can be well described with common mean-field techniques based on density functional theory (DFT), while the latter case with its two distinct barriers localized at the interfaces usually requires a multideterminant description. There is a third scenario with just one barrier localized inside the molecule which we investigate here using a variety of quantum-chemical methods by studying partial charge shifts in biphenyl radical ions induced by an electric field at different angles to modulate the coupling and thereby the barrier within the $\pi$-system. We find steps rounded off at the edges in the charge versus field curves for weak and intermediate coupling, whose accurate description requires a correct treatment of both exchange and dynamical correlation effects is essential. We establish that DFT standard functionals fail to reproduce this feature, while a long range corrected hybrid functional fares much better, which makes it a reasonable choice for a proper DFT-based transport description of such single barrier systems