• We report results from an exploratory study implementing a new probe of Galactic evolution using archival Hubble Space Telescope imaging observations. Precise proper motions are combined with photometric relative metallicity and temperature indices, to produce the proper motion rotation curves of the Galactic bulge separately for metal-poor and metal-rich Main Sequence samples. This provides a "pencil-beam" complement to large-scale wide-field surveys, which to-date have focused on the more traditional bright Giant Branch tracers. We find strong evidence that the Galactic bulge rotation curves drawn from "Metal-rich" and "Metal-poor" samples are indeed discrepant. The "Metal-rich" sample shows greater rotation amplitude and a steeper gradient against line of sight distance, as possibly a stronger central concentration along the line of sight. This may represent a new detection of differing orbital anisotropy between metal-rich and metal-poor bulge objects. We also investigate selection effects that would be implied for the longitudinal proper motion cut often used to isolate a "pure-bulge" sample. Extensive investigation of synthetic stellar populations suggest that instrumental and observational artifacts are unlikely to account for the observed rotation curve differences. Thus, proper motion-based rotation curves can be used to probe chemo-dynamical correlations for Main Sequence tracer stars, which are orders of magnitude more numerous in the Galactic Bulge than the bright Giant Branch tracers. We discuss briefly the prospect of using this new tool to constrain detailed models of Galactic formation and evolution.
  • The velocity anisotropy parameter, beta, is a measure of the kinematic state of orbits in the stellar halo which holds promise for constraining the merger history of the Milky Way (MW). We determine global trends for beta as a function of radius from three suites of simulations, including accretion only and cosmological hydrodynamic simulations. We find that both types of simulations are consistent and predict strong radial anisotropy (<beta>~0.7) for Galactocentric radii greater than 10 kpc. Previous observations of beta for the MW's stellar halo claim a detection of an isotropic or tangential "dip" at r~20 kpc. Using the N-body+SPH simulations, we investigate the temporal persistence, population origin, and severity of "dips" in beta. We find dips in the in situ stellar halo are long-lived, while dips in the accreted stellar halo are short-lived and tied to the recent accretion of satellite material. We also find that a major merger as early as z~1 can result in a present day low (isotropic to tangential) value of beta over a wide range of radii and angular expanse. While all of these mechanisms are plausible drivers for the beta dip observed in the MW, in the simulations, each mechanism has a unique metallicity signature associated with it, implying that future spectroscopic surveys could distinguish between them. Since an accurate knowledge of beta(r) is required for measuring the mass of the MW halo, we note significant transient dips in beta could cause an overestimate of the halo's mass when using spherical Jeans equation modeling.
  • The shape of LOSVDs (line-of-sight velocity distributions) carries important information about the internal dynamics of galaxies. The skewness of LOSVDs represents their asymmetric deviation from a Gaussian profile. Correlations between the skewness parameter ($h_3$) and the mean velocity (\vm) of a Gauss-Hermite series reflect the underlying stellar orbital configurations of different morphological components. Using two self-consistent $N$-body simulations of disk galaxies with different bar strengths, we investigate \hv\ correlations at different inclination angles. Similar to previous studies, we find anticorrelations in the disk area, and positive correlations in the bar area when viewed edge-on. However, at intermediate inclinations, the outer parts of bars exhibit anticorrelations, while the core areas dominated by the boxy/peanut-shaped (B/PS) bulges still maintain weak positive correlations. When viewed edge-on, particles in the foreground/background disk (the wing region) in the bar area constitute the main velocity peak, whereas the particles in the bar contribute to the high-velocity tail, generating the \hv\ correlation. If we remove the wing particles, the LOSVDs of the particles in the outer part of the bar only exhibit a low-velocity tail, resulting in a negative \hv\ correlation, whereas the core areas in the central region still show weakly positive correlations. We discuss implications for IFU observations on bars, and show that the variation of the \hv\ correlation in the disk galaxy may be used as a kinematic indicator of the bar and the B/PS bulge.
  • In Debattista et al. (2015), we proposed that a kiloparsec-scale nuclear disc is responsible for the high-velocity secondary peak in the stellar line-of-sight velocity distributions (LOSVDs) seen at positive longitudes in the bulge by the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE). Here, we make further qualitative but distinctive predictions of the kinematic properties of a nuclear disc, including for the LOSVDs at negative longitudes (which APOGEE-2 will observe) and examine the proper motions throughout the disc. Since a nuclear ring is also able to produce similar high-velocity LOSVD peaks, we present predictions for the proper motion signatures which distinguish between a nuclear disc and a nuclear ring. We also demonstrate that the stars in a nuclear disc, which would be on x2 orbits perpendicular to the bar, can remain on these orbits for a long time and can therefore be old. We show that such (old) nuclear discs of comparable size exist in external galaxies.
  • We present an extensively updated version of the purely ray-tracing 3D dust radiation transfer code DART-Ray. The new version includes five major upgrades : 1) a series of optimizations for the ray-angular density and the scattered radiation source function; 2) the implementation of several data and task parallelizations using hybrid MPI+OpenMP schemes; 3) the inclusion of dust self-heating; 4) the ability to produce surface brightness maps for observers within the models in HEALPix format; 5) the possibility to set the expected numerical accuracy already at the start of the calculation. We tested the updated code with benchmark models where the dust self-heating is not negligible. Furthermore, we performed a study of the extent of the source influence volumes, using galaxy models, which are critical in determining the efficiency of the DART-Ray algorithm. The new code is publicly available, documented for both users and developers, and accompanied by several programmes to create input grids for different model geometries and to import the results of N-body and SPH simulations. These programmes can be easily adapted to different input geometries, and for different dust models or stellar emission libraries.
  • The growth of black holes (BHs) in disk galaxies lacking classical bulges, which implies an absence of significant mergers, appears to be driven by secular processes. Short bars of sub-kiloparsec radius have been hypothesized to be an important mechanism for driving gas inflows to small scale, feeding central BHs. In order to quantify the maximum BH mass allowed by this mechanism, we examine the robustness of short bars to the dynamical influence of BHs. Large-scale bars are expected to be robust, long-lived structures; extremely massive BHs, which are rare, are needed to completely destroy such bars. However, we find that short bars, which are generally embedded in large-scale outer bars, can be destroyed quickly when BHs of mass $M_{\rm bh}\sim0.05-0.2\%$ of the total stellar mass ($M_\star$) are present. In agreement with this prediction, all galaxies observed to host short bars have BHs with a mass fraction less than $0.2\%M_\star$. Thus the dissolution of short inner bars is possible, perhaps even frequent, in the universe. An important implication of this result is that inner bar-driven gas inflows may be terminated when BHs grow to $\sim0.1\%M_\star$. We predict that $0.2\%M_\star$ is the maximum mass of BHs allowed if they are fed predominately via inner bars. This value matches well the maximum ratio of BH-to-host galaxy stellar mass observed in galaxies with pseudo-bulges and most nearby AGN host galaxies. This hypothesis provides a novel explanation for the lower $M_{\rm bh}/M_\star$ in galaxies which have avoided significant mergers compared with galaxies with classical bulges.
  • We present tilting rates for galaxies comparable to the Milky Way (MW) in a $\Lambda$ cold dark matter cosmological hydrodynamical simulation, and compare these with the predicted tilting rate detection limit of the {\it Gaia} satellite $0.28\degrees$Gyr$^{-1}$. We first identify galaxies with mass comparable to the MW ($9 \times 10^{11} \le M_{200} \le 1.2 \times 10^{12} \Msun $) and consider the tilting rates between $z=0.3$ and $0$. This sample yields a tilting rate of $7.6\degrees \pm 4.5\degrees$Gyr$^{-1}$. We constrain our sample further to exclude any galaxies that have high stellar accretion during the same time. We still find significant tilting, with an average rate of $6.3\degrees$Gyr$^{-1}$. Both subsamples tilt with rates significantly above {\it Gaia}'s predicted detection limit. We show that our sample of galaxies covers a wide range of environments, including some similar to the MW's. We find galaxies in denser regions tilt with higher rates then galaxies in less dense regions. We also find correlations between the angular misalignment of the hot gas corona, and the tilting rate. {\it Gaia} is likely to be able to directly measure tilting in the MW. Such a detection will provide an important constraint on the environment of the MW, including the rate of gas cooling onto the disc, the shape and orientation of its dark matter halo, and the mass of the Large Magellanic Cloud. Conversely, failure to detect tilting may suggest the MW is in a very quiet configuration.
  • Using a cosmological $N$-body simulation, we investigate the origin and distribution of stars in the intracluster light (ICL) of a Fornax-like cluster. In a dark matter only simulation we identify a halo which, at $z=0$, has $M_200 \simeq 4.1 \times 10^{13}M_{sun}$ and $r_{200} = 700kpc$, and replace infalling subhalos with models that include spheroid and disc components. As they fall into the cluster, the stars in some of these galaxies are stripped from their hosts, and form the ICL. We consider the separate contributions to the ICL from stars which originate in the haloes and the discs of the galaxies. We find that disc ICL stars are more centrally concentrated than halo ICL stars. The majority of the disc ICL stars are associated with one initially disc-dominated galaxy that falls to the centre of the cluster and is heavily disrupted, producing part of the cD galaxy. At radial distances greater than 200kpc, well beyond the stellar envelope of the cD galaxy, stars formerly from the stellar haloes of galaxies dominate the ICL. Therefore at large distances, the ICL population is dominated by older stars.
  • Stellar migration, whether due to trapping by transient spirals (churning), or to scattering by non-axisymmetric perturbations, has been proposed to explain the presence of stars in outer disks. After a review of the basic theory, we present compelling, but not yet conclusive, evidence that churning has been important in the outer disks of galaxies with type II (down-bending) profiles, while scattering has produced the outer disks of type III (up-bending) galaxies. In contrast, field galaxies with type I (pure exponential) profiles appear to not have experienced substantial migration. We conclude by suggesting work that would improve our understanding of the origin of outer disks.
  • We present a novel interpretation of the previously puzzling different behaviours of stellar populations of the Milky Way's bulge. We first show, by means of pure N-body simulations, that initially co-spatial stellar populations with different in-plane random motions separate when a bar forms. The radially cooler populations form a strong bar, and are vertically thin and peanut-shaped, while the hotter populations form a weaker bar and become a vertically thicker box. We demonstrate that it is the radial, not the vertical, velocity dispersion that dominates this evolution. Assuming that early stellar discs heat rapidly as they form, then both the in-plane and vertical random motions correlate with stellar age and chemistry, leading to different density distributions for metal-rich and metal-poor stars. We then use a high-resolution simulation, in which all stars form out of gas, to demonstrate that this is what happens. When we apply these results to the Milky Way we show that a very broad range of observed trends for ages, densities, kinematics and chemistries, that have been presented as evidence for contradictory paths to the formation of the bulge, are in fact consistent with a bulge which formed from a continuum of disc stellar populations which were kinematically separated by the bar. For the first time we are able to account for the bulge's main trends via a model in which the bulge formed largely in situ. Since the model is generic, we also predict the general appearance of stellar population maps of external edge-on galaxies.
  • The Milky Way bulge shows a box/peanut or X-shaped bulge (hereafter BP/X) when viewed in infrared or microwave bands. We examine orbits in an N-body model of a barred disk galaxy that is scaled to match the kinematics of the Milky Way (MW) bulge. We generate maps of projected stellar surface density, unsharp masked images, 3D excess-mass distributions (showing mass outside ellipsoids), line-of-sight number count distributions, and 2D line-of-sight kinematics for the simulation as well as co-added orbit families, in order to identify the orbits primarily responsible for the BP/X shape. We estimate that between 19-23\% of the mass of the bar is associated with the BP/X shape and that most bar orbits contribute to this shape which is clearly seen in projected surface density maps and 3D excess mass for non-resonant box orbits, "banana" orbits, "fish/pretzel" orbits and "brezel" orbits. {We find that nearly all bar orbit families contribute some mass to the 3D BP/X-shape. All co-added orbit families show a bifurcation in stellar number count distribution with heliocentric distance that resembles the bifurcation observed in red clump stars in the MW. However, only the box orbit family shows an increasing separation of peaks with increasing galactic latitude $|b|$, similar to that observed.} Our analysis shows that no single orbit family fully explains all the observed features associated with the MW's BP/X shaped bulge, but collectively the non-resonant boxes and various resonant boxlet orbits contribute at different distances from the center to produce this feature. We propose that since box orbits have three incommensurable orbital fundamental frequencies, their 3-dimensional shapes are highly flexible and, like Lissajous figures, this family of orbits is most easily able to adapt to evolution in the shape of the underlying potential.
  • A minimum in stellar velocity dispersion is often observed in the central regions of disc galaxies. To investigate the origin of this feature, known as a {\sigma}-drop, we analyse the stellar kinematics of a high-resolution N-body + smooth particle hydrodynamical simulation, which models the secular evolution of an unbarred disc galaxy. We compared the intrinsic mass-weighted kinematics to the recovered luminosity-weighted ones. The latter were obtained by analysing synthetic spectra produced by a new code, SYNTRA, that generates synthetic spectra by assigning a stellar population synthesis model to each star particle based on its age and metallicity. The kinematics were derived from the synthetic spectra as in real spectra to mimic the kinematic analysis of real galaxies. We found that the recovered luminosity-weighted kinematics in the centre of the simulated galaxy are biased to higher rotation velocities and lower velocity dispersions due to the presence of young stars in a thin and kinematically cool disc, and are ultimately responsible for the {\sigma}-drop.
  • Bulges of edge-on galaxies are often boxy/peanut-shaped (B/PS), and unsharp masks reveal the presence of an X shape. Simulations show that these shapes can be produced by dynamical processes driven by a bar which vertically thickens the centre. In the Milky Way, which contains such a B/PS bulge, the X-shaped structure is traced by the metal-rich stars but not by the metal-poor ones. Recently Debattista et al. (2016) interpreted this property as a result of the varying effect of the bar on stellar populations with different starting kinematics. This kinematic fractionation model predicts that cooler populations at the time of bar formation go on to trace the X shape, whereas hotter populations are more uniformly distributed. As this prediction is not specific to the Milky Way, we test it with MUSE observations of the B/PS bulge in the nearby galaxy NGC 4710. We show that the metallicity map is more peanut-shaped than the density distribution itself, in good agreement with the prediction. This result indicates that the X-shaped structure in B/PS bulges is formed of relatively metal-rich stars that have been vertically redistributed by the bar, whereas the metal-poor stars have a more uniform, box-shaped distribution.
  • Using $N$-body+SPH simulations of galaxies falling into a cluster, we study the evolution of their radial density profiles. When evolved in isolation, galaxies develop a type~II (down-bending) profile. In the cluster, the evolution of the profile depends on the minimum cluster-centric radius the galaxy reaches, which controls the degree of ram pressure stripping. If the galaxy falls to $\sim 50\%$ of the virial radius, then the profile remains type~II, but if the galaxy reaches down to $\sim 20\%$ of the virial radius the break weakens and the profile becomes more type~I like. The velocity dispersions are only slightly increased in the cluster simulations compared with the isolated galaxy; random motion therefore cannot be responsible for redistributing material sufficiently to cause the change in the profile type. Instead we find that the joint action of radial migration driven by tidally-induced spirals and the outside-in quenching of star formation due to ram pressure stripping alters the density profile. As a result, this model predicts a flattening of the age profiles amongst cluster lenticulars with type~I profiles, which can be observationally tested. %
  • Using high resolution $N$-body simulations, we recently reported that a dynamically cool inner disk embedded in a hotter outer disk can naturally generate a steady double-barred (S2B) structure. Here we study the kinematics of these S2B simulations, and compare them to integral-field observations from ATLAS$^{3D}$ and SAURON. We show that S2B galaxies exhibit several distinct kinematic features, namely: (1) significantly distorted isovelocity contours at the transition region between the two bars, (2) peaks in $\sigma_\mathrm{LOS}$ along the minor axis of inner bars, which we term "$\sigma$-humps", that are often accompanied by ring/spiral-like features of increased $\sigma_\mathrm{LOS}$, (3) $h_3-\bar{v}$ anti-correlations in the region of the inner bar for certain orientations, and (4) rings of positive $h_4$ when viewed at low inclinations. The most impressive of these features are the $\sigma$-humps, these evolve with the inner bar, oscillating in strength just as the inner bar does as it rotates relative to the outer bar. We show that, in cylindrical coordinates, the inner bar has similar streaming motions and velocity dispersion properties as normal large-scale bars, except for $\sigma_z$, which exhibits peaks on the minor axis, i.e., humps. These $\sigma_z$ humps are responsible for producing the $\sigma$-humps. For three well-resolved early-type S2Bs (NGC 2859, NGC 2950, and NGC 3941) and a potential S2B candidate (NGC 3384), the S2B model qualitatively matches the integral-field data well, including the "$\sigma$-hollows" previously identified. We also discuss the kinematic effect of a nuclear disk in S2Bs.
  • Globular clusters which exhibit chemical and dynamical complexity have been suggested to be the stripped nuclei of dwarf galaxies (e.g., M54, $\omega$ Cen). We use $N$-body simulations of nuclear star clusters forming via the mergers of star clusters to explore the persistence of substructure in the phase space. We find that the observed level of differentiation is difficult to reconcile with the observed if nuclear clusters form wholly out of the mergers of star clusters. Only the star clusters that merged most recently retain sufficiently distinct kinematics to be distinguishable from the rest of the nuclear cluster though the critical factor is the number of merger events not the elapsed time. In situ star formation must therefore be included to explain the observed properties of nuclear star clusters, in good agreement with previous results.
  • Recent analysis of the SDSS-III/APOGEE Data Release 12 stellar catalogue has revealed that the Milky Way's metallicity distribution function (MDF) changes shape as a function of radius, transitioning from being negatively skewed at small Galactocentric radii to positively skewed at large Galactocentric radii. Using a high resolution, N-body+SPH simulation, we show that the changing skewness arises from radial migration - metal-rich stars form in the inner disk and subsequently migrate to the metal-poorer outer disk. These migrated stars represent a large fraction (> 50%) of the stars in the outer disk; they populate the high metallicity tail of the MDFs and are, in general, more metal-rich than the surrounding outer disk gas. The simulation also reproduces another surprising APOGEE result: the spatially invariant high-[alpha/Fe] MDFs. This arises in the simulation from the migration of a population formed within a narrow range of radii (3.2+/-1.2 kpc) and time (8.8+/-0.6 Gyr ago), rather than from spatially extended star formation in a homogeneous medium at early times. These results point toward the crucial role radial migration has played in shaping our Milky Way.
  • The finding of a double red clump in the luminosity function of the Milky Way bulge has been interpreted as evidence for an X-shaped structure. Recently, an alternative explanation has been suggested, where the double red clump is an effect of multiple stellar populations in a classical spheroid. In this letter we provide an observational assessment of this scenario and show that it is not consistent with the behaviour of the red clump across different lines of sight, particularly at high distances from the Galactic plane. Instead, we confirm that the shape of the red clump magnitude distribution closely follows the distance distribution expected for an X-shaped bulge at critical Galactic latitudes. We also emphasize some key observational properties of the bulge red clump that should not be neglected in the search for alternative scenarios.
  • The Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment has measured the stellar velocities of red giant stars in the inner Milky Way. We confirm that the line of sight velocity distributions (LOSVDs) in the mid-plane exhibit a second peak at high velocities, whereas those at |b| = 2degrees do not. We use a high resolution simulation of a barred galaxy, which crucially includes gas and star formation, to guide our interpretation of the LOSVDs. We show that the data are fully consistent with the presence of a thin, rapidly rotating, nuclear disk extending to ~1 kpc. This nuclear disk is orientated perpendicular to the bar and is likely to be composed of stars on x2 orbits. The gas in the simulation is able to fall onto such orbits, leading to stars populating an orthogonal disk.
  • Large surveys have shown that red galaxies are preferentially aligned with their halos while blue galaxies have a more isotropic distribution. Since halos generally align with their filaments this introduces a bias in the measurement of the cosmic shear from weak lensing. It is therefore vitally important to understand why this difference arises. We explore the stability of different disc orientations within triaxial halos. We show that, in the absence of gas, the disc orientation is most stable when its spin is along the minor axis of the halo. Instead when gas cools onto a disc it is able to form in almost arbitrary orientation, including off the main planes of the halo (but avoiding an orientation perpendicular to the halo's intermediate axis). Substructure helps gasless galaxies reach alignment with the halo faster, but have less effect on galaxies when gas is cooling onto the disc. Our results provide a novel and natural interpretation for why red, gas poor galaxies are preferentially aligned with their halo, while blue, star-forming, galaxies have nearly random orientations, without requiring a connection between galaxies' current star formation rate and their merger history.
  • NGC 4395 is a bulgeless spiral galaxy, harboring one of the nearest known type 1 Seyfert nuclei. Although there is no consensus on the mass of its central engine, several estimates suggest it to be one of the lightest massive black holes (MBHs) known. We present the first direct dynamical measurement of the mass of this MBH from a combination of two-dimensional gas kinematic data, obtained with the adaptive optics assisted near infrared integral field spectrograph Gemini/NIFS, and high-resolution multiband photometric data from Hubble Space Telescope's Wide Field Camera 3 (HST/WFC3). We use the photometric data to model the shape and stellar mass-to-light ratio (M/L) of the nuclear star cluster. From the Gemini/NIFS observations, we derive the kinematics of warm molecular hydrogen gas as traced by emission through the H$_2$ 1--0 S(1) transition. These kinematics show a clear rotational signal, with a position angle orthogonal to NGC 4395's radio jet. Our best fitting tilted ring models of the kinematics of the molecular hydrogen gas contain a black hole with mass $M=4_{-3}^{+8}\times 10^5$ M$_\odot$ (3$\sigma$ uncertainties) embedded in a nuclear star cluster of mass $M=2 \times 10^6$ M$_\odot$. Our black hole mass measurement is in excellent agreement with the reverberation mapping mass estimate of Peterson et al. (2005), but shows some tension with other mass measurement methods based on accretion signals.
  • We present the study of a set of N-body+SPH simulations of a Milky Way-like system produced by the radiative cooling of hot gas embedded in a dark matter halo. The galaxy and its gaseous halo evolve for 10 Gyr in isolation, which allows us to study how internal processes affect the evolution of the system. We show how the morphology, the kinematics and the evolution of the galaxy are affected by the input supernova feedback energy E$_{\rm SN}$, and we compare its properties with those of the Milky Way. Different values of E$_{\rm SN}$ do not significantly affect the star formation history of the system, but the disc of cold gas gets thicker and more turbulent as feedback increases. Our main result is that, for the highest value of E$_{\rm SN}$ considered, the galaxy shows a prominent layer of extra-planar cold (log(T)<4.3) gas extended up to a few kpc above the disc at column densities of $10^{19}$ cm$^{-2}$. The kinematics of this material is in agreement with that inferred for the HI halos of our Galaxy and NGC 891, although its mass is lower. Also, the location, the kinematics and the typical column densities of the hot (5.3<log(T)<5.7) gas are in good agreement with those determined from the O$_{\rm VI}$ absorption systems in the halo of the Milky Way and external galaxies. In contrast with the observations, however, gas at log(T)<5.3 is lacking in the circumgalactic region of our systems.
  • Nuclear star clusters are among the densest stellar systems known and are common in both early- and late-type galaxies. They exhibit scaling relations with their host galaxy which may be related to those of supermassive black holes. These may therefore help us to unravel the complex physical processes occurring at the centres of galaxies. The properties of nuclear stellar systems suggest that their formation requires both dissipational and dissipationless processes. They have stellar populations of different ages, from stars as old as their host galaxy to young stars formed in the last 100 Myr. Therefore star formation must be happening either directly in the nuclear star cluster or in its vicinity. The secular processes that fuel the formation of pseudobulges very likely also contributes to nuclear star cluster growth.
  • About one third of early-type barred galaxies host small-scale secondary bars. The formation and evolution of such double-barred galaxies remain far from being well understood. In order to understand the formation of such systems, we explore a large parameter space of isolated pure-disk simulations. We show that a dynamically cool inner disk embedded in a hotter outer disk can naturally generate a steady secondary bar while the outer disk forms a large-scale primary bar. The independent bar instabilities of inner and outer disks result in long-lived double-barred structures whose dynamical properties are comparable with observations. This formation scenario indicates that the secondary bar might form from the general bar instability, the same as the primary bar. Under some circumstances, the interaction of the bars and the disk leads to the two bars aligning or single, nuclear, bars only. Simulations that are cool enough of the center to experience clump instabilities may also generate steady double-barred galaxies. In this case, the secondary bars are "fast", i.e., the bar length is close to the co-rotation radius. This is the first time that double-barred galaxies containing a fast secondary bar are reported. Previous orbit-based studies had suggested that fast secondary bars are not dynamically possible.
  • We describe the calculation of the stochastically heated dust emission using the 3D ray-tracing dust radiative transfer code DART-Ray, which is designed to solve the dust radiative transfer problem for galaxies with arbitrary geometries. In order to reduce the time required to derive the non-equilibrium dust emission spectra from each volume element within a model, we implemented an adaptive SED library approach, which we tested for the case of axisymmetric galaxy geometries. To show the capabilities of the code, we applied DART-Ray to a high-resolution N-body+SPH galaxy simulation to predict the appearance of the simulated galaxy at a set of wavelengths from the UV to the sub-mm. We analyse the results to determine the effect of dust on the observed radial and vertical profiles of the stellar emission as well as on the attenuation and scattering of light from the constituent stellar populations. We also quantify the proportion of dust re-radiated stellar light powered by young and old stellar populations, both bolometrically and as a function of infrared wavelength.