• Various fundamental-physics experiments such as measurement of the birefringence of the vacuum, searches for ultralight dark matter (e.g., axions), and precision spectroscopy of complex systems (including exotic atoms containing antimatter constituents) are enabled by high-field magnets. We give an overview of current and future experiments and discuss the state-of-the-art DC- and pulsed-magnet technologies and prospects for future developments.
  • We discuss a new family of multi-quanta bound states in the Standard Model, which exist due to the mutual Higgs-based attraction of the heaviest members of the SM, namely, gauge quanta $W,Z$ and (anti)top quarks, $\bar t, t $. We use a self-consistent mean-field approximation, up to a rather large particle number $N$. In this paper we do not focus on weakly-bound, non-relativistic bound states, but rather on "bags" in which the Higgs VEV is significantly modified/depleted. The minimal number $N$ above which such states appear strongly depends on the ratio of the Higgs mass to the masses of $W,Z,\bar{t}, t $: For a light Higgs mass $m_H \sim 50\, GeV$ bound states start from $N\sim O(10)$, but for a "realistic" Higgs mass, $m_H\sim 100\, GeV$, one finds metastable/bound $W,Z$ bags only for $N\sim O(1000)$. We also found that in the latter case pure top bags disappear for all N, although top quarks can still be well bound to the W-bags. Anticipating cosmological applications (discussed in a companion paper) of these bags as "doorway states" for baryosynthesis, we also consider the existence of such metastable bags at finite temperatures, when SM parameters such as Higgs, gauge and top masses are significantly modified.