• Pulsating extremely low-mass pre-white dwarf stars (pre-ELMV), with masses between ~0.15 Msun and ~0.30 Msun, constitute a new class of variable stars showing g- and possibly p-mode pulsations with periods between 320 and 6000 s, while main sequence delta Scuti stars, with masses between 1.2-2.5 Msun, pulsate in low-order g and p modes with periods in the range [700-28800] s. Interestingly enough, the instability strips of pre-ELM white dwarf and delta Scuti stars nearly overlap in the Teff vs. log g diagram, leading to a degeneracy when spectroscopy is the only tool to classify the stars and pulsation periods only are considered. We employ adiabatic and non-adiabatic pulsation for models of pre-ELM and delta Scuti stars, and compare their pulsation periods, period spacings and rates of period change. We found substantial differences in the periods spacing of delta Scuti and pre-ELM white dwarf models. Even when the same period range is observed, the modes have distinctive signature in the period spacing and period difference values. For instance, the mean period difference of p- modes of consecutive radial orders for delta Scuti model are at least four times longer than the mean period spacing for the pre-ELM white dwarf model in the period range [2000 - 4600] s. In addition, the rate of period change is two orders of magnitudes larger for the pre-ELM white dwarfs compared to delta Scuti stars. In addition, we also report the discovery of a new variable star, SDSSJ075738.94+144827.50, located in the region of the Teff vs. log g diagram where these two kind of stars coexist. The characteristic spacing between modes of consecutive radial orders (p as well as g modes) and the large differences found in the rates of period change for delta Scuti and pre-ELM white dwarf stars suggest that asteroseismology can be employed to discriminate between these two groups of variable stars.
  • The nearby red giant Aldebaran is known to host a gas giant planetary companion from decades of ground-based spectroscopic radial velocity measurements. Using Gaussian Process-based Continuous Auto-Regressive Moving Average (CARMA) models, we show that these historic data also contain evidence of acoustic oscillations in the star itself, and verify this result with further dedicated ground-based spectroscopy and space-based photometry with the Kepler Space Telescope. From the frequency of these oscillations we determine the mass of Aldebaran to be $1.16 \pm 0.07 \, M_\odot$, and note that this implies its planet will have been subject to insolation comparable to the Earth for some of the star's main sequence lifetime. Our approach to sparse, irregularly sampled time series astronomical observations has the potential to unlock asteroseismic measurements for thousands of stars in archival data, and push to lower-mass planets around red giant stars.
  • We present the analysis of an eccentric, partially eclipsing long-period ($P=19.23$ d) binary system KIC 9777062 that contains main sequence stars near the turnoff of the intermediate age open cluster NGC 6811. The primary is a metal-lined Am star with a possible convective blueshift to its radial velocities, and one star (probably the secondary) is likely to be a $\gamma$ Dor pulsator. The component masses are $1.603\pm0.006$(stat.)$\pm0.016$(sys.) and $1.419\pm0.003\pm0.008 M_\odot$, and the radii are $1.744\pm0.004\pm0.002$ and $1.544\pm0.002\pm0.002 R_\odot$. The isochrone ages of the stars are mildly inconsistent: the age from the mass-radius combination for the primary ($1.05\pm0.05\pm0.09$ Gyr, where the last quote was systematic uncertainty from models and metallicity) is smaller than that from the secondary ($1.21\pm0.05\pm0.15$ Gyr) and is consistent with the inference from the color-magnitude diagram ($1.00\pm0.05$ Gyr). We have improved the measurements of the asteroseismic parameters $\Delta \nu$ and $\nu_{\rm max}$ for helium-burning stars in the cluster. The masses of the stars appear to be larger (or alternately, the radii appear to be smaller) than predicted from isochrones using the ages derived from the eclipsing stars. The majority of stars near the cluster turnoff are pulsating stars: we identify a sample of 28 $\delta$ Sct, 15 $\gamma$ Dor, and 5 hybrid types. We used the period-luminosity relation for high-amplitude $\delta$ Sct stars to fit the ensemble of the strongest frequencies for the cluster members, finding $(m-M)_V = 10.37\pm0.03$. This is larger than most previous determinations, but smaller than values derived from the eclipsing binary ($10.47\pm0.05$).
  • The Kepler mission discovered 2842 exoplanet candidates with 2 years of data. We provide updates to the Kepler planet candidate sample based upon 3 years (Q1-Q12) of data. Through a series of tests to exclude false-positives, primarily caused by eclipsing binary stars and instrumental systematics, 855 additional planetary candidates have been discovered, bringing the total number known to 3697. We provide revised transit parameters and accompanying posterior distributions based on a Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithm for the cumulative catalogue of Kepler Objects of Interest. There are now 130 candidates in the cumulative catalogue that receive less than twice the flux the Earth receives and more than 1100 have a radius less than 1.5 Rearth. There are now a dozen candidates meeting both criteria, roughly doubling the number of candidate Earth analogs. A majority of planetary candidates have a high probability of being bonafide planets, however, there are populations of likely false-positives. We discuss and suggest additional cuts that can be easily applied to the catalogue to produce a set of planetary candidates with good fidelity. The full catalogue is publicly available at the NASA Exoplanet Archive.
  • About 20% out of the $>1000$ known exoplanets are Jupiter analogs orbiting very close to their parent stars. It is still under debate to what detectable level such hot Jupiters possibly affect the activity of the host stars through tidal or magnetic star-planet interaction. In this paper we report on an 87 ks Chandra observation of the hot Jupiter hosting star WASP-18. This system is composed of an F6 type star and a hot Jupiter of mass $10.4 M_{Jup}$ orbiting in less than 20 hr around the parent star. On the basis of an isochrone fitting, WASP-18 is thought to be 600 Myr old and within the range of uncertainty of 0.5-2 Gyr. The star is not detected in X-rays down to a luminosity limit of $4\times10^{26}$ erg/s, more than two orders of magnitude lower than expected for a star of this age and mass. This value proves an unusual lack of activity for a star with estimated age around 600 Myr. We argue that the massive planet can play a crucial role in disrupting the stellar magnetic dynamo created within its thin convective layers. Another additional 212 X-ray sources are detected in the Chandra image. We list them and briefly discuss their nature.
  • Convective envelopes in stars on the main sequence are usually connected only with stars of spectral types F5 or later. However, observations as well as theory indicate that the convective outer layers in earlier stars, despite being shallow, are still effective and turbulent enough to stochastically excite oscillations. Because of the low amplitudes, exploring stochastically excited pulsations became possible only with space missions such as Kepler and CoRoT. Here I review the recent results and discuss among others, pulsators such as delta Scuti, gamma Doradus, roAp, beta Cephei, Slowly Pulsating B and Be stars, all in the context of solar-like oscillations.
  • The radial velocity-discovered exoplanet HD 97658b was recently announced to transit, with a derived planetary radius of 2.93 \pm 0.28 R_{Earth}. As a transiting super-Earth orbiting a bright star, this planet would make an attractive candidate for additional observations, including studies of its atmospheric properties. We present and analyze follow-up photometric observations of the HD 97658 system acquired with the MOST space telescope. Our results show no transit with the depth and ephemeris reported in the announcement paper. For the same ephemeris, we rule out transits for a planet with radius larger than 2.09 R_{Earth}, corresponding to the reported 3\sigma lower limit. We also report new radial velocity measurements which continue to support the existence of an exoplanet with a period of 9.5 days, and obtain improved orbital parameters.
  • We report the radial-velocity discovery of a second planetary mass companion to the K0 V star HD 37605, which was already known to host an eccentric, P~55 days Jovian planet, HD 37605b. This second planet, HD 37605c, has a period of ~7.5 years with a low eccentricity and an Msini of ~3.4 MJup. Our discovery was made with the nearly 8 years of radial velocity follow-up at the Hobby-Eberly Telescope and Keck Observatory, including observations made as part of the Transit Ephemeris Refinement and Monitoring Survey (TERMS) effort to provide precise ephemerides to long-period planets for transit follow-up. With a total of 137 radial velocity observations covering almost eight years, we provide a good orbital solution of the HD 37605 system, and a precise transit ephemeris for HD 37605b. Our dynamic analysis reveals very minimal planet-planet interaction and an insignificant transit time variation. Using the predicted ephemeris, we performed a transit search for HD 37605b with the photometric data taken by the T12 0.8-m Automatic Photoelectric Telescope (APT) and the Microvariability and Oscillations of Stars (MOST) satellite. Though the APT photometry did not capture the transit window, it characterized the stellar activity of HD 37605, which is consistent of it being an old, inactive star, with a tentative rotation period of 57.67 days. The MOST photometry enabled us to report a dispositive null detection of a non-grazing transit for this planet. Within the predicted transit window, we exclude an edge-on predicted depth of 1.9% at >>10sigma, and exclude any transit with an impact parameter b>0.951 at greater than 5sigma. We present the BOOTTRAN package for calculating Keplerian orbital parameter uncertainties via bootstrapping. We found consistency between our orbital parameters calculated by the RVLIN package and error bars by BOOTTRAN with those produced by a Bayesian analysis using MCMC.