• Determining phenotype from genetic data is a fundamental challenge. Influenza A viruses undergo rapid antigenic drift and identification of emerging antigenic variants is critical to the vaccine selection process. Using former seasonal influenza A(H1N1) viruses, hemagglutinin sequence and corresponding antigenic data were analyzed in combination with 3-D structural information. We attributed variation in hemagglutination inhibition to individual amino acid substitutions and quantified their antigenic impact, validating a subset experimentally using reverse genetics. Substitutions identified as low-impact were shown to be a critical component of influenza antigenic evolution and by including these, as well as the high-impact substitutions often focused on, the accuracy of predicting antigenic phenotypes of emerging viruses from genotype was doubled. The ability to quantify the phenotypic impact of specific amino acid substitutions should help refine techniques that predict the fitness and evolutionary success of variant viruses, leading to stronger theoretical foundations for selection of candidate vaccine viruses.
  • Influenza viruses undergo continual antigenic evolution allowing mutant viruses to evade host immunity acquired to previous virus strains. Antigenic phenotype is often assessed through pairwise measurement of cross-reactivity between influenza strains using the hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay. Here, we extend previous approaches to antigenic cartography, and simultaneously characterize antigenic and genetic evolution by modeling the diffusion of antigenic phenotype over a shared virus phylogeny. Using HI data from influenza lineages A/H3N2, A/H1N1, B/Victoria and B/Yamagata, we determine patterns of antigenic drift across viral lineages, showing that A/H3N2 evolves faster and in a more punctuated fashion than other influenza lineages. We also show that year-to-year antigenic drift appears to drive incidence patterns within each influenza lineage. This work makes possible substantial future advances in investigating the dynamics of influenza and other antigenically-variable pathogens by providing a model that intimately combines molecular and antigenic evolution.