• We consider the problem of optimizing video delivery for a network supporting video clients streaming stored video. Specifically, we consider the problem of jointly optimizing network resource allocation and video quality adaptation. Our objective is to fairly maximize video clients' Quality of Experience (QoE) realizing tradeoffs among the mean quality, temporal variability in quality, and fairness, incorporating user preferences on rebuffering and cost of video delivery. We present a simple asymptotically optimal online algorithm, NOVA, to solve the problem. NOVA is asynchronous, and using minimal communication, distributes the tasks of resource allocation to network controller, and quality adaptation to respective video clients. Video quality adaptation in NOVA is also optimal for standalone video clients, and is well suited for use with DASH framework. Further, we extend NOVA for use with more general QoE models, networks shared with other traffic loads and networks using fixed/legacy resource allocation.
  • Network Utility Maximization (NUM) provides a key conceptual framework to study reward allocation amongst a collection of users/entities across disciplines as diverse as economics, law and engineering. In network engineering, this framework has been particularly insightful towards understanding how Internet protocols allocate bandwidth, and motivated diverse research efforts on distributed mechanisms to maximize network utility while incorporating new relevant constraints, on energy, power, storage, stability, etc., e.g., for systems ranging from communication networks to the smart-grid. However when the available resources and/or users' utilities vary over time, reward allocations will tend to vary, which in turn may have a detrimental impact on the users' overall satisfaction or quality of experience. This paper introduces a generalization of NUM framework which explicitly incorporates the detrimental impact of temporal variability in a user's allocated rewards. It explicitly incorporates tradeoffs amongst the mean and variability in users' reward allocations, as well as fairness. We propose a simple online algorithm to realize these tradeoffs, which, under stationary ergodic assumptions, is shown to be asymptotically optimal, i.e., achieves a long term performance equal to that of an offline algorithm with knowledge of the future variability in the system. This substantially extends work on NUM to an interesting class of relevant problems where users/entities are sensitive to temporal variability in their service or allocated rewards.
  • Network Utility Maximization (NUM) provides the key conceptual framework to study resource allocation amongst a collection of users/entities across disciplines as diverse as economics, law and engineering. In network engineering, this framework has been particularly insightful towards understanding how Internet protocols allocate bandwidth, and motivated diverse research on distributed mechanisms to maximize network utility while incorporating new relevant constraints, on energy/power, storage, stability, etc., for systems ranging from communication networks to the smart-grid. However when the available resources and/or users' utilities vary over time, a user's allocations will tend to vary, which in turn may have a detrimental impact on the users' utility or quality of experience. This paper introduces a generalized NUM framework which explicitly incorporates the detrimental impact of temporal variability in a user's allocated rewards. It explicitly incorporates tradeoffs amongst the mean and variability in users' allocations. We propose an online algorithm to realize variance-sensitive NUM, which, under stationary ergodic assumptions, is shown to be asymptotically optimal, i.e., achieves a time-average equal to that of an offline algorithm with knowledge of the future variability in the system. This substantially extends work on NUM to an interesting class of relevant problems where users/entities are sensitive to temporal variability in their service or allocated rewards.
  • We study sensor networks with energy harvesting nodes. The generated energy at a node can be stored in a buffer. A sensor node periodically senses a random field and generates a packet. These packets are stored in a queue and transmitted using the energy available at that time at the node. For such networks we develop efficient energy management policies. First, for a single node, we obtain policies that are throughput optimal, i.e., the data queue stays stable for the largest possible data rate. Next we obtain energy management policies which minimize the mean delay in the queue. We also compare performance of several easily implementable suboptimal policies. A greedy policy is identified which, in low SNR regime, is throughput optimal and also minimizes mean delay. Next using the results for a single node, we develop efficient MAC policies.
  • We study a sensor node with an energy harvesting source. The generated energy can be stored in a buffer. The sensor node periodically senses a random field and generates a packet. These packets are stored in a queue and transmitted using the energy available at that time. We obtain energy management policies that are throughput optimal, i.e., the data queue stays stable for the largest possible data rate. Next we obtain energy management policies which minimize the mean delay in the queue.We also compare performance of several easily implementable sub-optimal energy management policies. A greedy policy is identified which, in low SNR regime, is throughput optimal and also minimizes mean delay.