• Space-borne low-to medium-resolution (R~10^2-10^3) transmission spectroscopy of atmospheres detect the broadest spectral features (alkali doublets, molecular bands, scattering), while high-resolution (R~10^5), ground-based observations probe the sharpest features (cores of the alkali lines, molecular lines).The two techniques differ by:(1) The LSF of ground-based observations is 10^3 times narrower than for space-borne observations;(2)Space-borne transmission spectra probe up to the base of thermosphere, while ground-based observations can reach pressures down to 10^(-11);(3)Space-borne observations directly yield the transit depth of the planet, while ground-based observations measure differences in the radius of the planet at different wavelengths.It is challenging to combine both techniques.We develop a method to compare theoretical models with observations at different resolutions.We introduce PyETA, a line-by-line 1D radiative transfer code to compute transmission spectra at R~10^6 (0.01 A) over a broad wavelength range.An hybrid forward modeling/retrieval optimization scheme is devised to deal with the large computational resources required by modeling a broad wavelength range (0.3-2 $\mu$m) at high resolution.We apply our technique to HD189733b.Here, HST observations reveal a flattened spectrum due to scattering by aerosols, while high-resolution ground-based HARPS observations reveal the sharp cores of sodium lines.We reconcile these results by building models that reproduce simultaneously both data sets, from the troposphere to the thermosphere. We confirm:(1)the presence of scattering by tropospheric aerosols;(2)that the sodium core feature is of thermospheric origin.Accounting for aerosols, the sodium cores indicate T up to 10000K in the thermosphere.The precise value of the thermospheric temperature is degenerate with the abundance of sodium and altitude of the aerosol deck.
  • Planets that reside close-in to their host star are subject to intense high-energy irradiation. Extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) and X-ray radiation (together, XUV) is thought to drive mass loss from planets with volatile envelopes. We present $\textit{XMM-Newton}$ observations of six nearby stars hosting transiting planets in tight orbits (with orbital period, $P_\text{orb} < 10\,$d), wherein we characterise the XUV emission from the stars and subsequent irradiation levels at the planets. In order to reconstruct the unobservable EUV emission, we derive a new set of relations from Solar $\textit{TIMED/SEE}$ data that are applicable to the standard bands of the current generation of X-ray instruments. From our sample, WASP-80b and HD$\,$149026b experience the highest irradiation level, but HAT-P-11b is probably the best candidate for Ly$\,\alpha$ evaporation investigations because of the system's proximity to the Solar System. The four smallest planets have likely lost a greater percentage of their mass over their lives than their larger counterparts. We also detect the transit of WASP-80b in the near ultraviolet with the Optical Monitor on $\textit{XMM-Newton}$.
  • EarthFinder is a Probe Mission concept selected for study by NASA for input to the 2020 astronomy decadal survey. This study is currently active and a final white paper report is due to NASA at the end of calendar 2018. We are tasked with evaluating the scientific rationale for obtaining precise radial velocity (PRV) measurements in space, which is a two-part inquiry: What can be gained from going to space? What can't be done form the ground? These two questions flow down to these specific tasks for our study - Identify the velocity limit, if any, introduced from micro- and macro-telluric absorption in the Earth's atmosphere; Evaluate the unique advantages that a space-based platform provides to emable the identification and mitigation of stellar acitivity for multi-planet signal recovery.
  • As revealed by its peculiar Kepler light curve, the enigmatic star KIC 8462852 undergoes short and deep flux dimmings at a priori unrelated epochs. It presents nonetheless all other characteristics of a quiet 1 Gyr old F3V star. These dimmings resemble the absorption features expected for the transit of dust cometary tails. The exocomet scenario is therefore most commonly advocated. We reanalyzed the Kepler data and extracted a new high-quality light curve to allow for the search of shallow signature of single or a few exocomets. We discovered that among the 22 flux dimming events that we identified, two events present a striking similarity. These events occurred 928.25 days apart, lasted for 4.4 days with a drop of the star brightness by 1000 ppm. We show that the light curve of these events is well explained by the occultation of the star by a giant ring system, or the transit of a string of half a dozen of exocomets with a typical dust production rate of 10$^5$-10$^6$ kg/s. Assuming that these two similar events are related to the transit of the same object, we derive a period of 928.25 days. The following transit was expected in March 2017 but bad weather prohibited us to detect it from ground-based spectroscopy. We predict that the next event will occur from the 3rd to the 8th of October 2019.
  • Infrared radiation emitted from a planet contains information about the chemical composition and vertical temperature profile of its atmosphere. If upper layers are cooler than lower layers, molecular gases will produce absorption features in the planetary thermal spectrum. Conversely, if there is a stratosphere - where temperature increases with altitude - these molecular features will be observed in emission. It has been suggested that stratospheres could form in highly irradiated exoplanets, but the extent to which this occurs is unresolved both theoretically and observationally. A previous claim for the presence of a stratosphere remains open to question, owing to the challenges posed by the highly variable host star and the low spectral resolution of the measurements. Here we report a near-infrared thermal spectrum for the ultrahot gas giant WASP-121b, which has an equilibrium temperature of approximately 2,500 kelvin. Water is resolved in emission, providing a detection of an exoplanet stratosphere at 5-sigma confidence. These observations imply that a substantial fraction of incident stellar radiation is retained at high altitudes in the atmosphere, possibly by absorbing chemical species such as gaseous vanadium oxide and titanium oxide.
  • We present new radial velocity measurements for three low-metallicity solar-like stars observed with the SOPHIE spectrograph and its predecessor ELODIE, both installed at the 193 cm telescope of the Haute-Provence Observatory, allowing the detection and characterization of three new giant extrasolar planets in intermediate periods of 1.7 to 3.7 years. All three stars, HD17674, HD42012 and HD29021 present single giant planetary companions with minimum masses between 0.9 and 2.5 MJup. The range of periods and masses of these companions, along with the distance of their host stars, make them good targets to look for astrometric signals over the lifetime of the new astrometry satellite Gaia. We discuss the preliminary astrometric solutions obtained from the first Gaia data release.
  • We present an XMM-Newton X-ray observation of TRAPPIST-1, which is an ultracool dwarf star recently discovered to host three transiting and temperate Earth-sized planets. We find the star is a relatively strong and variable coronal X-ray source with an X-ray luminosity similar to that of the quiet Sun, despite its much lower bolometric luminosity. We find L_x/L_bol=2-4x10^-4, with the total XUV emission in the range L_xuv/L_bol=6-9x10^-4, and XUV irradiation of the planets that is many times stronger than experienced by the present-day Earth. Using a simple energy-limited model we show that the relatively close-in Earth-sized planets, which span the classical habitable zone of the star, are subject to sufficient X-ray and EUV irradiation to significantly alter their primary and any secondary atmospheres. Understanding whether this high-energy irradiation makes the planets more or less habitable is a complex question, but our measured fluxes will be an important input to the necessary models of atmospheric evolution.
  • The exoplanet HD97658b provides a rare opportunity to probe the atmospheric composition and evolution of moderately irradiated super-Earths. It transits a bright K star at a moderate orbital distance of 0.08 au. Its low density is compatible with a massive steam envelope that could photodissociate at high altitudes and become observable as escaping hydrogen. Our analysis of 3 transits with HST/STIS at Ly-alpha reveals no such signature, suggesting that the thermosphere is not hydrodynamically expanding and is subjected to a low escape of neutral hydrogen (<10^8 g/s at 3 sigma). Using HST Ly-alpha and Chandra & XMM-Newton observations at different epochs, we find that HD97658 is a weak and soft X-ray source with signs of chromospheric variability in the Ly-alpha line core. We determine an average reference for the intrinsic Ly-alpha line and XUV spectrum of the star, and show that HD97658 b is in mild conditions of irradiation compared to other known evaporating exoplanets with an XUV irradiation about 3 times lower than the evaporating warm Neptune GJ436 b. This could be why the thermosphere of HD97658b is not expanding: the low XUV irradiation prevents an efficient photodissociation of any putative steam envelope. Alternatively, it could be linked to a low hydrogen content or inefficient conversion of the stellar energy input. The HD97658 system provides clues for understanding the stability of low-mass planet atmospheres. Our study of HD97658 b can be seen as a control experiment of our methodology, confirming that it does not bias detections of atmospheric escape and underlining its strength and reliability. Our results show that stellar activity can be efficiently discriminated from absorption signatures by a transiting exospheric cloud. They also highlight the potential of observing the upper atmosphere of small transiting planets to probe their physical and chemical properties
  • The warm Neptune GJ436b was observed with HST/STIS at three different epochs in the stellar Ly-alpha line, showing deep, repeated transits caused by a giant exosphere of neutral hydrogen. The low radiation pressure from the M-dwarf host star was shown to play a major role in the dynamics of the escaping gas. Yet by itself it cannot explain the time-variable spectral features detected in each transit. Here we investigate the combined role of radiative braking and stellar wind interactions using numerical simulations with the EVaporating Exoplanet code (EVE) and we derive atmospheric and stellar properties through the direct comparison of simulated and observed spectra. Our simulations match the last two epochs well. The observed sharp early ingresses come from the abrasion of the planetary coma by the stellar wind. Spectra observed during the transit can be produced by a dual exosphere of planetary neutrals (escaped from the upper atmosphere of the planet) and neutralized protons (created by charge-exchange with the stellar wind). We find similar properties at both epochs for the planetary escape rate (2.5x10$^{8}$ g/s), the stellar photoionization rate (2x10$^{-5}$ /s), the stellar wind bulk velocity (85 km/s), and its kinetic dispersion velocity (10 km/s). We find high velocities for the escaping gas (50-60 km/s) that may indicate MHD waves that dissipate in the upper atmosphere and drive the planetary outflow. In the last epoch the high density of the stellar wind (3x10$^{3}$ /cm3) led to the formation of an exospheric tail mainly composed of neutralized protons. The observations of GJ436 b allow for the first time to clearly separate the contributions of radiation pressure and stellar wind and to probe the regions of the exosphere shaped by each mechanism.
  • The recent detection of a giant exosphere surrounding the warm Neptune GJ436 b has shed new light on the evaporation of close-in planets, revealing that moderately irradiated, low-mass exoplanets could make exceptional targets for studying this mechanism and its impact on the exoplanet population. Three HST/STIS observations were performed in the Lyman-$\alpha$ line of GJ436 at different epochs, showing repeatable transits with large depths and extended durations. Here, we study the role played by stellar radiation pressure on the structure of the exosphere and its transmission spectrum. We found that the neutral hydrogen atoms in the exosphere of GJ436 b are not swept away by radiation pressure as shown to be the case for evaporating hot Jupiters. Instead, the low radiation pressure from the M-dwarf host star only brakes the gravitational fall of the escaping hydrogen toward the star and allows its dispersion within a large volume around the planet, yielding radial velocities up to about -120 km s$^{-1}$ that match the observations. We performed numerical simulations with the EVaporating Exoplanets code (EVE) to study the influence of the escape rate, the planetary wind velocity, and the stellar photoionization. While these parameters are instrumental in shaping the exosphere and yield simulation results in general agreement with the observations, the spectra observed at the different epochs show specific, time-variable features that require additional physics.
  • Exoplanets orbiting close to their parent stars could lose some fraction of their atmospheres because of the extreme irradiation. Atmospheric mass loss primarily affects low-mass exoplanets, leading to suggest that hot rocky planets might have begun as Neptune-like, but subsequently lost all of their atmospheres; however, no confident measurements have hitherto been available. The signature of this loss could be observed in the ultraviolet spectrum, when the planet and its escaping atmosphere transit the star, giving rise to deeper and longer transit signatures than in the optical spectrum. Here we report that in the ultraviolet the Neptune-mass exoplanet GJ 436b (also known as Gliese 436b) has transit depths of 56.3 +/- 3.5% (1 sigma), far beyond the 0.69% optical transit depth. The ultraviolet transits repeatedly start ~2 h before, and end >3 h after the ~1 h optical transit, which is substantially different from one previous claim (based on an inaccurate ephemeris). We infer from this that the planet is surrounded and trailed by a large exospheric cloud composed mainly of hydrogen atoms. We estimate a mass-loss rate in the range of ~10^8-10^9 g/s, which today is far too small to deplete the atmosphere of a Neptune-like planet in the lifetime of the parent star, but would have been much greater in the past.
  • We present the detection and characterization of the transiting warm Jupiter KOI-12b, first identified with Kepler with an orbital period of 17.86 days. We combine the analysis of Kepler photometry with Doppler spectroscopy and line-profile tomography of time-series spectra obtained with the SOPHIE spectrograph to establish its planetary nature and derive its properties. To derive reliable estimates for the uncertainties on the tomographic model parameters, we devised an empirical method to calculate statistically independent error bars on the time-series spectra. KOI-12b has a radius of 1.43$\pm$0.13$ R_\mathrm{Jup}$ and a 3$\sigma$ upper mass limit of 10$M_\mathrm{Jup}$. It orbits a fast-rotating star ($v$sin$i_{\star}$ = 60.0$\pm$0.9 km s$^{-1}$) with mass and radius of 1.45$\pm$0.09 $M_\mathrm{Sun}$ and 1.63$\pm$0.15 $R_\mathrm{Sun}$, located at 426$\pm$40 pc from the Earth. Doppler tomography allowed a higher precision on the obliquity to be reached by comparison with the analysis of the Rossiter-McLaughlin radial velocity anomaly, and we found that KOI-12b lies on a prograde, slightly misaligned orbit with a low sky-projected obliquity $\lambda$ = 12.6$\stackrel{+3.0}{_{-2.9}}^\circ$. The properties of this planetary system, with a 11.4 magnitude host-star, make of KOI-12b a precious target for future atmospheric characterization.
  • We present time-resolved spectroscopy of transits of the super-Earth 55 Cnc e using HARPS-N observations. We devised an empirical correction for the "color effect" affecting the radial velocity residuals from the Keplerian fit, which significantly improves their dispersion with respect to the HARPS-N pipeline standard data-reduction. Using our correction, we were able to detect the smallest Rossiter-McLaughlin anomaly amplitude of an exoplanet so far (~60 cm/s). The super-Earth 55 Cnc e is also the smallest exoplanet with a Rossiter-McLaughlin anomaly detection. We measured the sky-projected obliquity lambda = 72.4 (+12.7 -11.5 deg), indicating that the planet orbit is prograde, highly misaligned and nearly polar compared to the stellar equator. The entire 55 Cancri system may have been highly tilted by the presence of a stellar companion.
  • Transit observations in Ly-alpha of HD209458b and HD189733b revealed signatures of neutral hydrogen escaping the planets. We present a 3D particle model of the dynamics of the escaping atoms, and calculate theoretical Ly-alpha absorption line profiles, which can be directly compared with the absorption observed in the blue wing of the line. For HD209458b the observed velocities of the escaping atoms up to -130km/s are naturally explained by radiation-pressure acceleration. The observations are well-fitted with an ionizing flux of about 3-4 times solar and a hydrogen escape rate in the range 10^9-10^11g/s, in agreement with theoretical predictions. For HD189733b absorption by neutral hydrogen was observed in 2011 in the velocity range -230 to -140km/s. These velocities are higher than for HD209458b and require an additional acceleration mechanism for the escaping hydrogen atoms, which could be interactions with stellar wind protons. We constrain the stellar wind (temperature ~3x10^4K, velocity 200+-20km/s and density in the range 10^3-10^7/cm3) as well as the escape rate (4x10^8-10^11g/s) and ionizing flux (6-23 times solar). We also reveal the existence of an 'escape-limited' saturation regime in which most of the escaping gas interacts with the stellar protons. In this regime, which occurs at proton densities above ~3x10^5/cm3, the amplitude of the absorption signature is limited by the escape rate and does not depend on the wind density. The non-detection of escaping hydrogen in earlier observations in 2010 can be explained by the suppression of the stellar wind at that time, or an escape rate of about an order of magnitude lower than in 2011. For both planets, best-fit simulations show that the escaping atmosphere has the shape of a cometary tail.
  • Observations of transits of the hot giant exoplanet HD 189733b in the unresolved HI Lyman-alpha line show signs of hydrogen escaping the upper atmosphere of the planet. New resolved Lyman-alpha observations obtained with the STIS spectrograph onboard the Hubble Space Telescope in April 2010 and September 2011 confirmed that the planet is evaporating, and furthermore discovered significant temporal variations in the physical conditions of its evaporating atmosphere. Here we present a detailed analysis of the September 2011 observations of HD 189733b, when an atmospheric signature was detected. We present specific methods to find and characterize this absorption signature of escaping hydrogen in the Lyman-alpha line, and to calculate its false-positive probability, found to be 3.6%. Taking advantage of the spectral resolution and high sensitivity of the STIS spectrograph, we also present new results on temporal and spectro-temporal variability of this absorption feature. We also report the observation of HD 189733b in other lines (SiIII at 1206.5A, NV at 1240A). Variations in these lines could be explained either by early occultation by a bow-shock rich in highly ionized species, or by stellar variations.
  • The naked-eye star 55 Cancri hosts a planetary system with five known planets, including a hot super-Earth (55 Cnc e) extremely close to its star and a farther out giant planet (55 Cnc b), found in milder irradiation conditions with respect to other known hot Jupiters. This system raises important questions on the evolution of atmospheres for close-in exoplanets, and the dependence with planetary mass and irradiation. These questions can be addressed by Lyman-alpha transit observations of the extended hydrogen planetary atmospheres, complemented by contemporaneous measurements of the stellar X-ray flux. In fact, planet `e' has been detected in transit, suggesting the system is seen nearly edge-on. Yet, planet `b' has not been observed in transit so far. Here, we report on Hubble Space Telescope STIS Lyman-alpha and Chandra ACIS-S X-ray observations of 55 Cnc. These simultaneous observations cover two transits of 55 Cnc e and two inferior conjunctions of 55 Cnc b. They reveal the star as a bright Lyman-alpha target and a variable X-ray source. While no significant signal is detected during the transits of 55 Cnc e, we detect a surprising Lyman-alpha absorption of 7.5 +/- 1.8% (4.2 sigma) at inferior conjunctions of 55 Cnc b. The absorption is only detected over the range of Doppler velocities where the stellar radiation repels hydrogen atoms towards the observer. We calculate a false-alarm probability of 4.4%, which takes into account the a-priori unknown transit parameters. This result suggests the possibility that 55 Cnc b has an extended upper H I atmosphere, which undergoes partial transits when the planet grazes the stellar disc. If confirmed, it would show that planets cooler than hot Jupiters can also have extended atmospheres.