• The scale of modern datasets necessitates the development of efficient distributed optimization methods for machine learning. We present a general-purpose framework for distributed computing environments, CoCoA, that has an efficient communication scheme and is applicable to a wide variety of problems in machine learning and signal processing. We extend the framework to cover general non-strongly-convex regularizers, including L1-regularized problems like lasso, sparse logistic regression, and elastic net regularization, and show how earlier work can be derived as a special case. We provide convergence guarantees for the class of convex regularized loss minimization objectives, leveraging a novel approach in handling non-strongly-convex regularizers and non-smooth loss functions. The resulting framework has markedly improved performance over state-of-the-art methods, as we illustrate with an extensive set of experiments on real distributed datasets.
  • Data augmentation, a technique in which a training set is expanded with class-preserving transformations, is ubiquitous in modern machine learning pipelines. In this paper, we seek to establish a theoretical framework for understanding modern data augmentation techniques. We start by showing that for kernel classifiers, data augmentation can be approximated by first-order feature averaging and second-order variance regularization components. We connect this general approximation framework to prior work in invariant kernels, tangent propagation, and robust optimization. Next, we explicitly tackle the compositional aspect of modern data augmentation techniques, proposing a novel model of data augmentation as a Markov process. Under this model, we show that performing $k$-nearest neighbors with data augmentation is asymptotically equivalent to a kernel classifier. Finally, we illustrate ways in which our theoretical framework can be leveraged to accelerate machine learning workflows in practice, including reducing the amount of computation needed to train on augmented data, and predicting the utility of a transformation prior to training.
  • Federated learning poses new statistical and systems challenges in training machine learning models over distributed networks of devices. In this work, we show that multi-task learning is naturally suited to handle the statistical challenges of this setting, and propose a novel systems-aware optimization method, MOCHA, that is robust to practical systems issues. Our method and theory for the first time consider issues of high communication cost, stragglers, and fault tolerance for distributed multi-task learning. The resulting method achieves significant speedups compared to alternatives in the federated setting, as we demonstrate through simulations on real-world federated datasets.
  • With the growth of data and necessity for distributed optimization methods, solvers that work well on a single machine must be re-designed to leverage distributed computation. Recent work in this area has been limited by focusing heavily on developing highly specific methods for the distributed environment. These special-purpose methods are often unable to fully leverage the competitive performance of their well-tuned and customized single machine counterparts. Further, they are unable to easily integrate improvements that continue to be made to single machine methods. To this end, we present a framework for distributed optimization that both allows the flexibility of arbitrary solvers to be used on each (single) machine locally, and yet maintains competitive performance against other state-of-the-art special-purpose distributed methods. We give strong primal-dual convergence rate guarantees for our framework that hold for arbitrary local solvers. We demonstrate the impact of local solver selection both theoretically and in an extensive experimental comparison. Finally, we provide thorough implementation details for our framework, highlighting areas for practical performance gains.
  • Despite the importance of sparsity in many large-scale applications, there are few methods for distributed optimization of sparsity-inducing objectives. In this paper, we present a communication-efficient framework for L1-regularized optimization in the distributed environment. By viewing classical objectives in a more general primal-dual setting, we develop a new class of methods that can be efficiently distributed and applied to common sparsity-inducing models, such as Lasso, sparse logistic regression, and elastic net-regularized problems. We provide theoretical convergence guarantees for our framework, and demonstrate its efficiency and flexibility with a thorough experimental comparison on Amazon EC2. Our proposed framework yields speedups of up to 50x as compared to current state-of-the-art methods for distributed L1-regularized optimization.
  • Distributed optimization methods for large-scale machine learning suffer from a communication bottleneck. It is difficult to reduce this bottleneck while still efficiently and accurately aggregating partial work from different machines. In this paper, we present a novel generalization of the recent communication-efficient primal-dual framework (CoCoA) for distributed optimization. Our framework, CoCoA+, allows for additive combination of local updates to the global parameters at each iteration, whereas previous schemes with convergence guarantees only allow conservative averaging. We give stronger (primal-dual) convergence rate guarantees for both CoCoA as well as our new variants, and generalize the theory for both methods to cover non-smooth convex loss functions. We provide an extensive experimental comparison that shows the markedly improved performance of CoCoA+ on several real-world distributed datasets, especially when scaling up the number of machines.
  • Communication remains the most significant bottleneck in the performance of distributed optimization algorithms for large-scale machine learning. In this paper, we propose a communication-efficient framework, CoCoA, that uses local computation in a primal-dual setting to dramatically reduce the amount of necessary communication. We provide a strong convergence rate analysis for this class of algorithms, as well as experiments on real-world distributed datasets with implementations in Spark. In our experiments, we find that as compared to state-of-the-art mini-batch versions of SGD and SDCA algorithms, CoCoA converges to the same .001-accurate solution quality on average 25x as quickly.
  • MLI is an Application Programming Interface designed to address the challenges of building Machine Learn- ing algorithms in a distributed setting based on data-centric computing. Its primary goal is to simplify the development of high-performance, scalable, distributed algorithms. Our initial results show that, relative to existing systems, this interface can be used to build distributed implementations of a wide variety of common Machine Learning algorithms with minimal complexity and highly competitive performance and scalability.