• AGN exhibit rapid, high amplitude stochastic flux variations across the entire electromagnetic spectrum on timescales ranging from hours to years. The cause of this variability is poorly understood. We present a Green's Function-based method for using variability to (1) measure the time-scales on which flux perturbations evolve and (2) characterize the driving flux perturbations. We model the observed light curve of an AGN as a linear differential equation driven by stochastic impulses. We analyze the light curve of the Kepler AGN Zw 229-15 and find that the observed variability behavior can be modeled as a damped harmonic oscillator perturbed by a colored noise process. The model powerspectrum turns over on time-scale $385$~d. On shorter time-scales, the log-powerspectrum slope varies between $2$ and $4$, explaining the behavior noted by previous studies. We recover and identify both the $5.6$~d and $67$~d timescales reported by previous work using the Green's Function of the C-ARMA equation rather than by directly fitting the powerspectrum of the light curve. These are the timescales on which flux perturbations grow, and on which flux perturbations decay back to the steady-state flux level respectively. We make the software package KALI used to study light curves using our method available to the community.
  • The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) is a large-aperture, wide-field, ground-based survey system that will image the sky in six optical bands from 320 to 1050 nm, uniformly covering approximately $18,000$deg$^2$ of the sky over 800 times. The LSST is currently under construction on Cerro Pach\'on in Chile, and expected to enter operations in 2022. Once operational, the LSST will explore a wide range of astrophysical questions, from discovering "killer" asteroids to examining the nature of Dark Energy. The LSST will generate on average 15 TB of data per night, and will require a comprehensive Data Management system to reduce the raw data to scientifically useful catalogs and images with minimum human intervention. These reductions will result in a real-time alert stream, and eleven data releases over the 10-year duration of LSST operations. To enable this processing, the LSST project is developing a new, general-purpose, high-performance, scalable, well documented, open source data processing software stack for O/IR surveys. Prototypes of this stack are already capable of processing data from existing cameras (e.g., SDSS, DECam, MegaCam), and form the basis of the Hyper-Suprime Cam (HSC) Survey data reduction pipeline.
  • We gauge the impact of spacecraft-induced effects on the inferred variability properties of the light curve of the Seyfert 1 AGN Zw 229-15 observed by \Kepler. We compare the light curve of Zw 229-15 obtained from the Kepler MAST database with a re-processed light curve constructed from raw pixel data (Williams & Carini, 2015). We use the first-order structure function, $SF(\delta t)$, to fit both light curves to the damped power-law PSD of Kasliwal, Vogeley & Richards, 2015. On short timescales, we find a steeper log-PSD slope ($\gamma = 2.90$ to within $10$ percent) for the re-processed light curve as compared to the light curve found on MAST ($\gamma = 2.65$ to within $10$ percent)---both inconsistent with a damped random walk which requires $\gamma = 2$. The log-PSD slope inferred for the re-processed light curve is consistent with previous results (Carini & Ryle, 2012, Williams & Carini, 2015) that study the same re-processed light curve. The turnover timescale is almost identical for both light curves ($27.1$ and $27.5$~d for the reprocessed and MAST database light curves). Based on the obvious visual difference between the two versions of the light curve and on the PSD model fits, we conclude that there remain significant levels of spacecraft-induced effects in the standard pipeline reduction of the Kepler data. Re-processing the light curves will change the model inferenced from the data but is unlikely to change the overall scientific conclusion reached by Kasliwal et al. 2015---not all AGN light curves are consistent with the DRW.
  • We test the consistency of active galactic nuclei (AGN) optical flux variability with the $\textit{damped random walk}$ (DRW) model. Our sample consists of 20 multi-quarter $\textit{Kepler}$ AGN light curves including both Type 1 and 2 Seyferts, radio-loud and -quiet AGN, quasars, and blazars. $\textit{Kepler}$ observations of AGN light curves offer a unique insight into the variability properties of AGN light curves because of the very rapid ($11.6-28.6$ min) and highly uniform rest-frame sampling combined with a photometric precision of $1$ part in $10^{5}$ over a period of 3.5 yr. We categorize the light curves of all 20 objects based on visual similarities and find that the light curves fall into 5 broad categories. We measure the first order structure function of these light curves and model the observed light curve with a general broken power-law PSD characterized by a short-timescale power-law index $\gamma$ and turnover timescale $\tau$. We find that less than half the objects are consistent with a DRW and observe variability on short timescales ($\sim 2$ h). The turnover timescale $\tau$ ranges from $\sim 10-135$ d. Interesting structure function features include pronounced dips on rest-frame timescales ranging from $10-100$ d and varying slopes on different timescales. The range of observed short-timescale PSD slopes and the presence of dip and varying slope features suggests that the DRW model may not be appropriate for all AGN. We conclude that AGN variability is a complex phenomenon that requires a more sophisticated statistical treatment.