• Physical theories address different numbers of degrees of freedom depending on the scale under consideration. In this work generalized mathematical structures (nonlinear $\mathcal{B}_{\kappa}$-embeddings) are constructed that encompass objects with different dimensionality as the continuous scale parameter $\kappa \in \mathbb{R}$ is varied. Based on this method, a new approach to compactification in unified physical theories (e.g. supergravity in 10 or 11-dimensional spacetimes) is pointed out. We also show how $\mathcal{B}_{\kappa}$-embeddings can be used to connect all cellular automata (CAs) to coupled map lattices (CMLs) and nonlinear partial differential equations, deriving a class of nonlinear diffusion equations. Finally, by means of nonlinear embeddings we introduce CA connections, a class of CMLs that connect any two arbitrary CAs in the limits $\kappa \to 0$ and $\kappa \to \infty$ of the embedding. Applications to biophysics and fundamental physics are discussed.
  • It is shown that characteristic functions of sets can be made fuzzy by means of the $\mathcal{B}_{\kappa}$-function, recently introduced by the author, where the fuzziness parameter $\kappa \in \mathbb{R}$ controls how much a fuzzy set deviates from the crisp set obtained in the limit $\kappa \to 0$. As applications, we present first a general expression for a switching function that may be of interest in electrical engineering and in the design of nonlinear time-series. We then introduce another general expression that allows wallpaper and frieze patterns for every possible planar symmetry group (besides patterns typical of quasicrystals) to be designed. We show how the fuzziness parameter $\kappa$ plays an analogous role to temperature in physical applications and may be used to break the symmetry of spatial patterns. As a further, important application, we establish a theorem on the shaping of limit cycle oscillations far from bifurcations in smooth deterministic nonlinear dynamical systems governed by differential equations. Following this application, we briefly discuss a generalization of the Stuart-Landau equation to non-sinusoidal oscillators obtained as a consequence of our theorem.
  • We present a diagrammatic method to build up sophisticated cellular automata (CAs) as models of complex physical systems. The diagrams complement the mathematical approach to CA modeling, whose details are also presented here, and allow CAs in rule space to be classified according to their hierarchy of layers. Since the method is valid for any discrete operator and only depends on the alphabet size, the resulting conclusions, of general validity, apply to CAs in any dimension or order in time, arbitrary neighborhood ranges and topology. We provide several examples of the method, illustrating how it can be applied to the mathematical modeling of the emergence of order out of disorder. Specifically, we show how the the majority CA rule can be used as a building block to construct more complex cellular automata in which separate domains (with substructures having different dynamical properties) are able to emerge out of disorder and coexist in a stable manner.
  • A biophysical model of epimorphic regeneration based on a continuum percolation process of fully penetrable disks in two dimensions is proposed. All cells within a randomly chosen disk of the regenerating organism are assumed to receive a signal in the form of a circular wave as a result of the action/reconfiguration of neoblasts and neoblast-derived mesenchymal cells in the blastema. These signals trigger the growth of the organism, whose cells read, on a faster time scale, the electric polarization state responsible for their differentiation and the resulting morphology. In the long time limit, the process leads to a morphological attractor that depends on experimentally accessible control parameters governing the blockage of cellular gap junctions and, therefore, the connectivity of the multicellular ensemble. When this connectivity is weakened, positional information is degraded leading to more symmetrical structures. This general theory is applied to the specifics of planaria regeneration. Computations and asymptotic analyses made with the model show that it correctly describes a significant subset of the most prominent experimental observations, notably anterior-posterior polarization (and its loss) or the formation of four-headed planaria.
  • We present a weakly coupled map lattice model for patterning that explores the effects exerted by weakening the local dynamic rules on model biological and artificial networks composed of two-state building blocks (cells). To this end, we use two cellular automata models based on: (i) a smooth majority rule (model I) and (ii) a set of rules similar to those of Conway's Game of Life (model II). The normal and abnormal cell states evolve according with local rules that are modulated by a parameter $\kappa$. This parameter quantifies the effective weakening of the prescribed rules due to the limited coupling of each cell to its neighborhood and can be experimentally controlled by appropriate external agents. The emergent spatio-temporal maps of single-cell states should be of significance for positional information processes as well as for intercellular communication in tumorigenesis where the collective normalization of abnormal single-cell states by a predominantly normal neighborhood may be crucial.
  • We introduce $\mathcal{B}_{\kappa}$-embeddings, nonlinear mathematical structures that connect, through smooth paths parameterized by $\kappa$, a finite or denumerable set of objects at $\kappa=0$ (e.g. numbers, functions, vectors, coefficients of a generating function...) to their ordinary sum at $\kappa \to \infty$. We show that $\mathcal{B}_{\kappa}$-embeddings can be used to design nonlinear irreversible processes through this connection. A number of examples of increasing complexity are worked out to illustrate the possibilities uncovered by this concept. These include not only smooth functions but also fractals on the real line and on the complex plane. As an application, we use $\mathcal{B}_{\kappa}$-embeddings to formulate a robust method for finding all roots of a univariate polynomial without factorizing or deflating the polynomial. We illustrate this method by finding all roots of a polynomial of 19th degree.
  • A simple discontinuous map is proposed as a generic model for nonlinear dynamical systems. The orbit of the map admits exact solutions for wide regions in parameter space and the method employed (digit manipulation) allows the mathematical design of useful signals, such as regular or aperiodic oscillations with specific waveforms, the construction of complex attractors with nontrivial properties as well as the coexistence of different basins of attraction in phase space with different qualitative properties. A detailed analysis of the dynamical behavior of the map suggests how the latter can be used in the modeling of complex nonlinear dynamics including, e.g., aperiodic nonchaotic attractors and the hierarchical deposition of grains of different sizes on a surface.
  • The union of a collection of $n$ sets is generally expressed in terms of a characteristic (indicator) function that contains $2^{n}-1$ terms. In this article, a much simpler expression is found that requires the evaluation of $n$ terms only. This leads to a major simplification of any normal form involving characteristic functions of sets. The formula can be useful in recognizing inclusion-exclusion patterns of combinatorial problems.
  • A general mathematical method is presented for the systematic construction of coupled map lattices (CMLs) out of deterministic cellular automata (CAs). The entire CA rule space is addressed by means of a universal map for CAs that we have recently derived and that is not dependent on any freely adjustable parameters. The CMLs thus constructed are termed real-valued deterministic cellular automata (RDCA) and encompass all deterministic CAs in rule space in the asymptotic limit $\kappa \to 0$ of a continuous parameter $\kappa$. Thus, RDCAs generalize CAs in such a way that they constitute CMLs when $\kappa$ is finite and nonvanishing. In the limit $\kappa \to \infty$ all RDCAs are shown to exhibit a global homogeneous fixed-point that attracts all initial conditions. A new bifurcation is discovered for RDCAs and its location is exactly determined from the linear stability analysis of the global quiescent state. In this bifurcation, fuzziness gradually begins to intrude in a purely deterministic CA-like dynamics. The mathematical method presented allows to get insight in some highly nontrivial behavior found after the bifurcation.
  • A minimalistic model for chimera states is presented. The model is a cellular automaton (CA) which depends on only one adjustable parameter, the range of the nonlocal coupling, and is built from elementary cellular automata and the majority (voting) rule. This suggests the universality of chimera-like behavior from a new point of view: Already simple CA rules based on the majority rule exhibit this behavior. After a short transient, we find chimera states for arbitrary initial conditions, the system spontaneously splitting into stable domains separated by static boundaries, ones synchronously oscillating and the others incoherent. When the coupling range is local, nontrivial coherent structures with different periodicities are formed.
  • A new class of deterministic dynamical systems, termed semipredictable dynamical systems, is presented. The spatiotemporal evolution of these systems have both predictable and unpredictable traits, as found in natural complex systems. We prove a general result: The dynamics of any deterministic nonlinear cellular automaton (CA) with $p$ possible dynamical states can be decomposed at each instant of time in a superposition of $N$ layers involving $p_{0}$, $p_{1}$,... $p_{N-1}$ dynamical states each, where the $p_{k\in \mathbb{N}}$, $k \in [0, N-1]$ are divisors of $p$. If the divisors coincide with the prime factors of $p$ this decomposition is unique. Conversely, we also prove that $N$ CA working on symbols $p_{0}$, $p_{1}$,... $p_{N-1}$ can be composed to create a graded CA rule with $N$ different layers. We then show that, even when the full spatiotemporal evolution can be unpredictable, certain traits (layers) can exactly be predicted. We present explicit examples of such systems involving compositions of Wolfram's 256 elementary CA and a more complex CA rule acting on a neighborhood of two sites and 12 symbols and whose rule table corresponds to the smallest Moufang loop $M_{12}(S_{3},2)$.
  • Fractal surfaces ('patchwork quilts') are shown to arise under most general circumstances involving simple bitwise operations between real numbers. A theory is presented for all deterministic bitwise operations on a finite alphabet. It is shown that these models give rise to a roughness exponent $H$ that shapes the resulting spatial patterns, larger values of the exponent leading to coarser surfaces.
  • A mathematical method for constructing fractal curves and surfaces, termed the $p\lambda n$ fractal decomposition, is presented. It allows any function to be split into a finite set of fractal discontinuous functions whose sum is equal everywhere to the original function. Thus, the method is specially suited for constructing families of fractal objects arising from a conserved physical quantity, the decomposition yielding an exact partition of the quantity in question. Most prominent classes of examples are provided by Hamiltonians and partition functions of statistical ensembles: By using this method, any such function can be decomposed in the ordinary sum of a specified number of terms (generally fractal functions), the decomposition being both exact and valid everywhere on the domain of the function.
  • A simple mathematical expression for the universal map for cellular automata is found in closed form with the help of a digit function, whose most basic properties are established. This result is found after proving a theorem on the composition of functions on finite sets. The expression (and the technique used to obtain it) opens the possibility of gaining mathematical insight in any cellular automaton rule since it constitutes at the same time a simple and fast algorithm to implement any such rule.
  • Substitution systems evolve in time by generating sequences of symbols from a finite alphabet: At a certain iteration step, the existing symbols are systematically replaced by blocks of $N_{k}$ symbols also within the alphabet (with $N_{k}$, a natural number, being the length of the $k$-th block of the substitution). The dynamics of these systems leads naturally to fractals and self-similarity. By using $\mathcal{B}$-calculus [V. Garcia-Morales, Phys. Lett. A 376 (2012) 2645] universal maps for deterministic substitution systems both of constant and non-constant length, are formulated in 1D. It is then shown how these systems can be put in direct correspondence with Tsallis entropy. A `Second Law of Thermodynamics' is also proved for these systems in the asymptotic limit of large words.
  • By means of a digit function that has been introduced in a recent formulation of classical and quantum mechanics, we provide a new construction of some infinite families of finite groups, both abelian and nonabelian, of importance for theoretical, atomic and molecular physics. Our construction is not based on algebraic relationships satisfied by generators, but in establishing the appropriate law of composition that induces the group structure on a finite set of nonnegative integers (the cardinal of the set being equal to the order of the group) thus making computations with finite groups quite straightforward. We establish the abstract laws of composition for infinite families of finite groups including all cyclic groups (and any direct sums of them), dihedral, dicyclic and other metacyclic groups, the symmetric groups of permutations of $p$ symbols and the alternating groups of even permutations. Specific examples are given to illustrate the expressions for the law of composition obtained in each case.
  • A digit function is presented which provides the $i$th-digit in base $p$ of any real number $x$. By means of this function, formulated within $\mathcal{B}$-calculus, the local, nonlocal and global dynamical behaviors of cellular automata (CAs) are systematically explored and universal maps are derived for the three levels of description. None of the maps contain any freely adjustable parameter and they are valid for any number of symbols in the alphabet $p$ and neighborhood range $\rho$. A discrete general method to approximate any real continuous map in the unit interval by a CA on the rational numbers $\mathbb{Q}$ (Diophantine approximation) is presented. This result leads to establish a correspondence between the qualitative behavior found in bifurcation diagrams of real nonlinear maps and the Wolfram classes of CAs. The method is applied to the logistic map, for which a logistic CA is derived. The period doubling cascade into chaos is interpreted as a sequence of global cellular automata of Wolfram's class 2 leading to Class 3 aperiodic behavior. Class 4 behavior is also found close to the period-3 orbits.
  • A new variational method, the principle of least radix economy, is formulated. The mathematical and physical relevance of the radix economy, also called digit capacity, is established, showing how physical laws can be derived from this concept in a unified way. The principle reinterprets and generalizes the principle of least action yielding two classes of physical solutions: least action paths and quantum wavefunctions. A new physical foundation of the Hilbert space of quantum mechanics is then accomplished and it is used to derive the Schr\"odinger and Dirac equations and the breaking of the commutativity of spacetime geometry. The formulation provides an explanation of how determinism and random statistical behavior coexist in spacetime and a framework is developed that allows dynamical processes to be formulated in terms of chains of digits. These methods lead to a new (pre-geometrical) foundation for Lorentz transformations and special relativity. The Parker-Rhodes combinatorial hierarchy is encompassed within our approach and this leads to an estimate of the interaction strength of the electromagnetic and gravitational forces that agrees with the experimental values to an error of less than one thousandth. Finally, it is shown how the principle of least-radix economy naturally gives rise to Boltzmann's principle of classical statistical thermodynamics. A new expression for a general (path-dependent) nonequilibrium entropy is proposed satisfying the Second Law of Thermodynamics.
  • The photoelectrodissolution of n-type silicon constitutes a convenient model system to study the nonlinear dynamics of oscillatory media. On the silicon surface, a silicon oxide layer forms. In the lateral direction, the thickness of this layer is not uniform. Rather, several spatio-temporal patterns in the oxide layer emerge spontaneously, ranging from cluster patterns and turbulence to quite peculiar dynamics like chimera states. Introducing a nonlinear global coupling in the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation allows us to identify this nonlinear coupling as the essential ingredient to describe the patterns found in the experiments. The nonlinear global coupling is designed in such a way, as to capture an important, experimentally observed feature: the spatially averaged oxide-layer thickness shows nearly harmonic oscillations. Simulations of the modified complex Ginzburg-Landau equation capture the experimental dynamics very well.
  • We report a novel mechanism for the formation of chimera states, a peculiar spatiotemporal pattern with coexisting synchronized and incoherent domains found in ensembles of identical oscillators. Considering Stuart-Landau oscillators we demonstrate that a nonlinear global coupling can induce this symmetry breaking. We find chimera states also in a spatially extended system, a modified complex Ginzburg-Landau equation. This theoretical prediction is validated with an oscillatory electrochemical system, the electrooxidation of silicon, where the spontaneous formation of chimeras is observed without any external feedback control.
  • A simple mechanism for the emergence of complexity in cellular automata out of predictable dynamics is described. This leads to unfold the concept of conditional predictability for systems whose trajectory can only be piecewise known. The mechanism is used to construct a cellular automaton model for discrete chimera-like states, where synchrony and incoherence in an ensemble of identical oscillators coexist. The incoherent region is shown to have a periodicity that is three orders of magnitude longer than the period of the synchronous oscillation.
  • A universal map is derived for all deterministic 1D cellular automata (CA) containing no freely adjustable parameters. The map can be extended to an arbitrary number of dimensions and topologies and its invariances allow to classify all CA rules into equivalence classes. Complexity in 1D systems is then shown to emerge from the weak symmetry breaking of the addition modulo an integer number p. The latter symmetry is possessed by certain rules that produce Pascal simplices in their time evolution. These results elucidate Wolfram's classification of CA dynamics.