• Due to its accuracy and generality, Monte Carlo radiative transfer (MCRT) has emerged as the prevalent method for Ly$\alpha$ radiative transfer in arbitrary geometries. The standard MCRT encounters a significant efficiency barrier in the high optical depth, diffusion regime. Multiple acceleration schemes have been developed to improve the efficiency of MCRT but the noise from photon packet discretization remains a challenge. The discrete diffusion Monte Carlo (DDMC) scheme has been successfully applied in state-of-the-art radiation hydrodynamics (RHD) simulations. Still, the established framework is not optimal for resonant line transfer. Inspired by the DDMC paradigm, we present a novel extension to resonant DDMC (rDDMC) in which diffusion in space and frequency are treated on equal footing. We explore the robustness of our new method and demonstrate a level of performance that justifies incorporating the method into existing Ly$\alpha$ codes. We present computational speedups of $\sim 10^2$-$10^6$ relative to contemporary MCRT implementations with schemes that skip scattering in the core of the line profile. This is because the rDDMC runtime scales with the spatial and frequency resolution rather than the number of scatterings - the latter is typically $\propto \tau_0$ for static media, or $\propto (a \tau_0)^{2/3}$ with core-skipping. We anticipate new frontiers in which on-the-fly Ly$\alpha$ radiative transfer calculations are feasible in 3D RHD. More generally, rDDMC is transferable to any computationally demanding problem amenable to a Fokker-Planck approximation of frequency redistribution.
  • We utilize the hydrodynamic and N-body code GIZMO, coupled with newly developed sub-grid Legacy models for Population~III (Pop~III) and Population~II (Pop~II), specifically designed for meso-scale cosmological volume simulations, to study the legacy of star formation in the pre-reionization Universe. We find that the Pop~II star formation rate density (SFRD), produced in our simulation ($\sim 10^{-2}\ M_\odot{\rm yr^{-1}\, Mpc^{-3}}$ at $z\simeq10$), matches the total SFRD inferred from observations within a factor of $<2$ at $7\lesssim z \lesssim10$. The Pop~III SFRD reaches a plateau at $\sim10^{-3}\ M_\odot{\rm yr^{-1}\, Mpc^{-3}}$ by $z~10$, and remains largely unaffected by the presence of Pop~II feedback. At $z$=7.5, $\sim20\%$ of Pop~III star formation occurs in dark matter haloes which are isolated, and have never experienced any Pop~II star formation (i.e. primordial haloes). We predict that Pop~III-only galaxies exist at magnitudes $M_{\rm UV}\gtrsim-11$, beyond the limits for direct detection with the James Webb Space Telescope. We assess that our stellar mass function (SMF) and UV luminosity function (UVLF) agree well with the observed low mass/faint-end behaviour at $z=8$ and $10$. However, beyond the current limiting magnitudes, we find that both our SMF and UVLF demonstrate a deviation/turnover from the expected power-law slope ($M_{\rm UV,turn}= -13.4\pm1.1$ at $z$=10). Our measured turnover implies that observational studies which integrate their observed luminosity functions by extrapolating the observed faint-end slope beyond their detection limit may overestimate the true SFRD by a factor of $2 (10)$ when integrating to $M_{\rm UV} = -$12($-$8) at $z\sim10$. Our turnover correlates well with the transition from dark matter haloes dominated by molecular cooling to those dominated by atomic cooling, for a mass $M_{\rm halo}\approx10^{8}M_\odot$ at $z\simeq10$.
  • We present a suite of six fully cosmological, three-dimensional simulations of the collapse of an atomic cooling halo in the early Universe. We use the moving-mesh code arepo with an improved primordial chemistry network to evolve the hydrodynamical and chemical equations. The addition of a strong Lyman-Werner background suppresses molecular hydrogen cooling and permits the gas to evolve nearly isothermally at a temperature of about 8000 K. Strong gravitational torques effectively remove angular momentum and lead to the central collapse of gas, forming a supermassive protostar at the center of the halo. We model the protostar using two methods: sink particles that grow through mergers with other sink particles, and a stiff equation of state that leads to the formation of an adiabatic core. We impose threshold densities of $10^8$, $10^{10}$, and $10^{12}\,\text{cm}^{-3}$ for the sink particle formation and the onset of the stiff equation of state to study the late, intermediate, and early stages in the evolution of the protostar, respectively. We follow its growth from masses $\simeq 10\,\text{M}_\odot$ to $\simeq 10^5\,\text{M}_\odot$, with an average accretion rate of $\langle\dot{M}_\star\rangle \simeq 2\,\text{M}_\odot\,\text{yr}^{-1}$ for sink particles, and $\simeq 0.8 - 1.4\,\text{M}_\odot\,\text{yr}^{-1}$ for the adiabatic cores. At the end of the simulations, the HII region generated by radiation from the central object has long detached from the protostellar photosphere, but the ionizing radiation remains trapped in the inner host halo, and has thus not yet escaped into the intergalactic medium. Fully coupled, radiation-hydrodynamics simulations hold the key for further progress.
  • The recent detection of the sky-averaged 21-cm cosmological signal indicates a stronger absorption than the maximum allowed value based on the standard model. One explanation for the required colder primordial gas is the energy transfer between the baryon and dark matter fluids due to non-gravitational scattering. Here, we explore the thermal evolution of primordial gas, collapsing to form Population III (Pop III) stars, when this energy transfer is included. Performing a series of one-zone calculations, we find that the evolution results in stars more massive than in the standard model, provided that the dark matter is described by the best-fit parameters inferred from the 21-cm observation. On the other hand, a significant part of the dark matter parameter space can be excluded by the requirement to form massive Pop III stars sufficiently early in cosmic history. Otherwise, the radiation background needed to bring about the strong Wouthuysen-Field coupling at z >~ 17, inferred to explain the 21-cm absorption feature, could not be builtup. Intriguingly, the independent constraint from the physics of first star formation at high densities points to a similarly narrow range in dark matter properties, compared to the conclusions from the 21-cm signal imprinted at low densities.
  • We present a model for the evolution of supermassive protostars from their formation at $M_\star \simeq 0.1\,\text{M}_\odot$ until their growth to $M_\star \simeq 10^5\,\text{M}_\odot$. To calculate the initial properties of the object in the optically thick regime we follow two approaches: based on idealized thermodynamic considerations, and on a more detailed one-zone model. Both methods derive a similar value of $n_{\rm F} \simeq 2 \times 10^{17} \,\text{cm}^{-3}$ for the density of the object when opacity becomes important, i.e. the opacity limit. The subsequent evolution of the growing protostar is determined by the accretion of gas onto the object and can be described by a mass-radius relation of the form $R_\star \propto M_\star^{1/3}$ during the early stages, and of the form $R_\star \propto M_\star^{1/2}$ when internal luminosity becomes important. For the case of a supermassive protostar, this implies that the radius of the star grows from $R_\star \simeq 0.65 \,{\rm AU}$ to $R_\star \simeq 250 \,{\rm AU}$ during its evolution. Finally, we use this model to construct a sub-grid recipe for accreting sink particles in numerical simulations. A prime ingredient thereof is a physically motivated prescription for the accretion radius and the effective temperature of the growing protostar embedded inside it. From the latter, we can conclude that photo-ionization feedback can be neglected until very late in the assembly process of the supermassive object.
  • We investigate the rotation velocity of the first stars by modelling the angular momentum transfer in the primordial accretion disc.Assessing the impact of magnetic braking, we consider the transition in angular momentum transport mode at the Alfv$\acute{\rm e}$n radius, from the dynamically dominated free-fall accretion to the magnetically dominated solid-body one.The accreting protostar at the centre of the primordial star-forming cloud rotates with close to breakup speed in the case without magnetic fields.Considering a physically-motivated model for small-scale turbulent dynamo amplification, we find that stellar rotation speed quickly declines if a large fraction of the initial turbulent energy is converted to magnetic energy ($\gtrsim 0.14$). Alternatively, if the dynamo process were inefficient, for amplification due to flux-freezing, stars would become slow rotators if the pre-galactic magnetic field strength is above a critical value, $\simeq 10^{-8.2}$G, evaluated at a scale of $n_{\rm H} = 1 {\rm cm}^{-3}$, which is significantly higher than plausible cosmological seed values ($\sim 10^{-15}$G). Because of the rapid decline of the stellar rotational speed over a narrow range in model parameters, the first stars encounter a bimodal fate: rapid rotation at almost the breakup level, or the near absence of any rotation.
  • We complete the formulation of the standard model of first star formation by exploring the possible impact of $\mathrm{LiH}$ cooling, which has been neglected in previous simulations of non-linear collapse. Specifically, we find that at redshift $z\gtrsim 5$, the cooling by $\mathrm{LiH}$ has no effect on the thermal evolution of shocked primordial gas, and of collapsing primordial gas into minihaloes or relic HII regions, even if the primordial lithium abundance were enhanced by one order of magnitude. Adding the most important lithium species to a minimum network of primordial chemistry, we demonstrate that insufficient $\mathrm{LiH}$ is produced in all cases considered, about $[\mathrm{LiH/Li}]\sim 10^{-9}$ for $T\lesssim 100$ K. Indeed, $\mathrm{LiH}$ cooling would only be marginally significant in shocked primordial gas for the highly unlikely case that the $\mathrm{LiH}$ abundance were increased by nine orders of magnitude, implying that $all$ lithium would have to be converted into $\mathrm{LiH}$. In this study, photo-destruction processes are not considered, and the collisional disassociation rate of $\mathrm{LiH}$ is possibly underestimated, rendering our results an extreme upper limit. Therefore, the cooling by $\mathrm{LiH}$ can safely be neglected for the thermal evolution of Population~III star-forming gas.
  • Using cosmological volume simulations and a custom built sub-grid model for Pop~III star formation, we examine the baseline dust extinction in the first galaxies due to Pop~III metal enrichment in the first billion years of cosmic history. We find that while the most enriched, high-density lines of sight in primordial galaxies can experience a measurable amount of extinction from Pop~III dust ($E(B-V)_{\rm max}=0.07,\ A_{\rm V,max}\approx0.28$), the average extinction is very low with $\left< E(B-V) \right> \lesssim 10^{-3}$. We derive a power-law relationship between dark matter halo mass and extinction of $E(B-V)\propto M_{\rm halo}^{0.80}$. Performing a Monte Carlo parameter study, we establish the baseline reddening of the UV spectra of dwarf galaxies at high redshift due to Pop~III enrichment only. With this method, we find $\left<\beta_{\rm UV}\right>-2.51\pm0.07$, which is both nearly halo mass and redshift independent.
  • We utilize the hydrodynamic and N-body code {\small GIZMO} coupled with our newly developed sub-grid Population~III (Pop~III) Legacy model, designed specifically for cosmological volume simulations, to study the baseline metal enrichment from Pop~III star formation at $z>7$. In this idealized numerical experiment, we only consider Pop~III star formation. We find that our model Pop~III star formation rate density (SFRD), which peaks at $\sim 10^{-3}\ {\rm M_\odot yr^{-1} Mpc^{-1}}$ near $z\sim10$, agrees well with previous numerical studies and is consistent with the observed estimates for Pop~II SFRDs. The mean Pop~III metallicity rises smoothly from $z=25-7$, but does not reach the critical metallicity value, $Z_{\rm crit}=10^{-4}\ Z_\odot$, required for the Pop~III to Pop~II transition in star formation mode until $z\simeq7$. This suggests that, while individual halos can suppress in-situ Pop~III star formation, the external enrichment is insufficient to globally terminate Pop~III star formation. The maximum enrichment from Pop~III star formation in star forming dark matter halos is $Z\sim10^{-2}\ Z_\odot$, whereas the minimum found in externally enriched haloes is $Z\gtrsim10^{-7}\ Z_\odot$. Finally, mock observations of our simulated IGM enriched with Pop~III metals produce equivalent widths similar to observations of an extremely metal poor damped Lyman alpha (DLA) system at $z=7.04$, which is thought to be enriched by Pop~III star formation only.
  • We investigate the star formation history and chemical evolution of isolated analogues of Local Group (LG) ultra faint dwarf galaxies (UFDs; stellar mass range of 10^2 solar mass < M_star <10^5 solar mass) and gas rich, low mass dwarfs (Leo P analogs; stellar mass range of 10^5 solar mass < M_star <10^6 solar mass). We perform a suite of cosmological hydrodynamic zoom-in simulations to follow their evolution from the era of the first generation of stars down to z=0. We confirm that reionization, combined with supernova (SN) feedback, is primarily responsible for the truncated star formation in UFDs. Specifically, haloes with a virial mass of M_vir < 2 x 10^9 solar mass form> 90\% of stars prior to reionization. Our work further demonstrates the importance of Population~III (Pop~III) stars, with their intrinsically high $\rm [C/Fe]$ yields, and the associated external metal-enrichment, in producing low-metallicity stars ($\rm [Fe/H]\lesssim-4$) and carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars. We find that UFDs are composite systems, assembled from multiple progenitor haloes, some of which hosted only Population~II (Pop~II) stars formed in environments externally enriched by SNe in neighboring haloes, naturally producing, extremely low-metallicity Pop~II stars. We illustrate how the simulated chemical enrichment may be used to constrain the star formation histories (SFHs) of true observed UFDs. We find that Leo P analogs can form in haloes with M_vir ~ 4 x 10^9 solar mass (z=0). Such systems are less affected by reionization and continue to form stars until z=0, causing higher metallicity tails. Finally, we predict the existence of extremely low-metallicity stars in LG UFD galaxies that preserve the pure chemical signatures of Pop~III nucleosynthesis.
  • The formation of the first stars in the high-redshift Universe is a sensitive probe of the small-scale, particle physics nature of dark matter (DM). We carry out cosmological simulations of primordial star formation in ultra-light, axion-like particle DM cosmology, with masses of $10^{-22}$ and $10^{-21}\,{\rm eV}$, with de Broglie wavelengths approaching galactic scales ($\sim$kpc). The onset of star formation is delayed, and shifted to more massive host structures. For the lightest DM particle mass explored here, first stars form at $z \sim 7$ in structures with $\sim 10^9\,{\rm M}_\odot$, compared to the standard minihalo environment within the $\Lambda$ cold dark matter ($\Lambda$CDM) cosmology, where $z \sim 20 - 30$ and $\sim 10^5 - 10^6\,{\rm M}_\odot$. Despite this greatly altered DM host environment, the thermodynamic behaviour of the metal-free gas as it collapses into the DM potential well asymptotically approaches a very similar evolutionary track. Thus, the fragmentation properties are predicted to remain the same as in $\Lambda$CDM cosmology, implying a similar mass scale for the first stars. These results predict intense starbursts in the axion cosmologies, which may be amenable to observations with the {\it James Webb Space Telescope}.
  • We use a semi-analytic model, ${\it Delphi}$, that jointly tracks the dark matter and baryonic assembly of high-redshift ($z \simeq 4-20$) galaxies to gain insight on the number density of Direct Collapse Black Hole (DCBH) hosts in three different cosmologies: the standard Cold Dark Matter (CDM) model and two Warm Dark Matter (WDM) models with particle masses of 3.5 and 1.5 keV. Obtaining the Lyman-Werner (LW) luminosity of each galaxy from ${\it Delphi}$, we use a clustering bias analysis to identify all, pristine halos with a virial temperature $T_{vir}>=10^4$ K that are irradiated by a LW background above a critical value as, DCBH hosts. In good agreement with previous studies, we find the DCBH number density rises from $\sim10^{-6.1}$ to $\sim 10^{-3.5}\, \mathrm{cMpc^{-3}}$ from $z\simeq 17.5$ to $8$ in the CDM model using a critical LW background value of $30 J_{21}$ (where $J_{21}= 10^{-21} \, {\rm erg\, s^{-1}\, Hz^{-1} \, cm^{-2} \, sr^{-1}}$). We find that a combination of delayed structure formation and an accelerated assembly of galaxies results in a later metal-enrichment and an accelerated build-up of the LW background in the 1.5 keV WDM model, resulting in DCBH hosts persisting down to much lower redshifts ($z \simeq 5$) as compared to CDM where DCBH hosts only exist down to $z \simeq 8$. We end by showing how the expected colours in three different bands of the Near Infrared Camera (NIRCam) onboard the forthcoming James Webb Space Telescope (${\it JWST}$) can be used to hunt for potential $z \simeq 5-9$ DCBHs, allowing hints on the WDM particle mass.
  • We perform a post-processing radiative feedback analysis on a 3D ab initio cosmological simulation of an atomic cooling halo under the direct collapse black hole (DCBH) scenario. We maintain the spatial resolution of the simulation by incorporating native ray-tracing on unstructured mesh data, including Monte Carlo Lyman-alpha (Ly{\alpha}) radiative transfer. DCBHs are born in gas-rich, metal-poor environments with the possibility of Compton-thick conditions, $N_H \gtrsim 10^{24} {\rm cm}^{-2}$. Therefore, the surrounding gas is capable of experiencing the full impact of the bottled-up radiation pressure. In particular, we find that multiple scattering of Ly{\alpha} photons provides an important source of mechanical feedback after the gas in the sub-parsec region becomes partially ionized, avoiding the bottleneck of destruction via the two-photon emission mechanism. We provide detailed discussion of the simulation environment, expansion of the ionization front, emission and escape of Ly{\alpha} radiation, and Compton scattering. A sink particle prescription allows us to extract approximate limits on the post-formation evolution of the radiative feedback. Fully coupled Ly{\alpha} radiation hydrodynamics will be crucial to consider in future DCBH simulations.
  • We briefly review the historical development of the ideas regarding the first supermassive black hole seeds, the physics of their formation and radiative feedback, recent theoretical and observational progress, and our outlook for the future.
  • Nascent neutron stars with millisecond periods and magnetic fields in excess of $10^{16}$ Gauss can drive highly energetic and asymmetric explosions known as magnetar-powered supernovae. These exotic explosions are one theoretical interpretation for supernovae Ic-BL which are sometimes associated with long gamma-ray bursts. Twisted magnetic field lines extract the rotational energy of the neutron star and release it as a disk wind or a jet with energies greater than 10$^{52}$ erg over $\sim 20$ sec. What fractions of the energy of the central engine go into the wind and the jet remain unclear. We have performed two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations of magnetar-powered supernovae (SNe) driven by disk winds and jets with the CASTRO code to investigate the effect of the central engine on nucleosynthetic yields, mixing, and light curves. We find that these explosions synthesize less than 0.05 Msun of Ni and that this mass is not very sensitive to central engine type. The morphology of the explosion can provide a powerful diagnostic of the properties of the central engine. In the absence of a circumstellar medium these events are not very luminous, with peak bolometric magnitudes $M_b \sim -16.5 $ due to low Ni production.
  • The initial mass function of the first, Population III (Pop III), stars plays a vital role in shaping galaxy formation and evolution in the early Universe. One key remaining issue is the final fate of secondary protostars formed in the accretion disc, specifically whether they merge or survive. We perform a suite of hydrodynamic simulations of the complex interplay between fragmentation, protostellar accretion, and merging inside dark matter minihaloes. Instead of the traditional sink particle method, we employ a stiff equation of state approach, so that we can more robustly ascertain the viscous transport inside the disc. The simulations show inside-out fragmentation because the gas collapses faster in the central region. Fragments migrate on the viscous timescale, over which angular momentum is lost, enabling them to move towards the disc centre, where merging with the primary protostar can occur. This process depends on the fragmentation scale, such that there is a maximum scale of $(1 - 5) \times 10^4$ au, inside which fragments can migrate to the primary protostar. Viscous transport is active until radiative feedback from the primary protostar destroys the accretion disc. The final mass spectrum and multiplicity thus crucially depends on the effect of viscosity in the disc. The entire disc is subjected to efficient viscous transport in the primordial case with viscous parameter $\alpha \le 1$. An important aspect of this question is the survival probability of Pop III binary systems, possible gravitational wave sources to be probed with the Advanced LIGO detectors.
  • We compare model results from a semi-analytic (merger-tree based) framework for high-redshift (z ~ 5-20) galaxy formation against reionization indicators, including the Planck electron scattering optical depth and the ionizing photon emissivity, to shed light on the reionization history and sources in Cold (CDM) and Warm Dark Matter (WDM; particle masses of $m_x = 1.5,3$ and 5 keV) cosmologies. This model includes all the key processes of star formation, supernova feedback, the merger/accretion/ejection driven evolution of gas and stellar mass and the effect of the ultra-violet background (UVB) in photo-evaporating the gas content of low-mass galaxies. We find that the delay in the start of reionization in light (1.5 keV) WDM models can be compensated by a steeper redshift evolution of the ionizing photon escape fraction and a faster mass assembly, resulting in reionization ending at comparable redshifts (z~5.5) in all the DM models considered. We find the bulk of the reionization photons come from galaxies with a halo mass $M_h < 10^9 M_\odot$ and a UV magnitude $ -15 < M_{UV} < -10$ in CDM. The progressive suppression of low-mass halos with decreasing $m_x$ leads to a shift in the reionization population to larger halo masses of $M_h > 10^9 M_\odot$ and $ -17 < M_{UV} < -13$ for 1.5 keV WDM. We find that current observations of the electron scattering optical depth and the Ultra-violet luminosity function are equally compatible with all the (cold and warm) DM models considered in this work. We propose that global indicators including the redshift evolution of the stellar mass density and the stellar mass-halo mass relation, observable with the James Webb Space Telescope, can be used to distinguish between CDM and WDM (1.5 keV) cosmologies.
  • We study the contribution of the first galaxies to the far-infrared/sub-millimeter (FIR/sub-mm) extragalactic background light (EBL) by implementing an analytical model for dust emission. We explore different dust models, assuming different grain size distributions and chemical compositions. According to our findings, observed re-radiated emission from dust in dwarf-size galaxies at $z \sim 10$ would peak at a wavelength of $\sim 500 \mu {\rm m}$ with observed fluxes of $\sim 10^{-3} - 10^{-2}$ nJy, which is below the capabilities of current observatories. In order to be detectable, model sources at these high redshifts should exhibit luminosities of $\gtrsim 10^{12} L_{\odot}$, comparable to that of local ultra-luminous systems. The FIR/sub-mm EBL generated by primeval galaxies peaks at $\sim 500 \mu {\rm m}$, with an intensity ranging from $\sim 10^{-4}$ to $10^{-3} {\rm nW \ m^{-2} \ sr^{-1}}$, depending on dust properties. These values are $\sim 3 - 4$ orders of magnitude below the absolute measured cosmic background level, suggesting that the first galaxies would not contribute significantly to the observed FIR/sub-mm EBL. Our model EBL exhibits a strong correlation with the dust-to-metal ratio, where we assume a fiducial value of $D = 0.005$, increasing almost proportionally to it. Thus, measurements of the FIR/sub-mm EBL could provide constraints on the amount of dust in the early Universe. Even if the absolute signal from primeval dust emission may be undetectable, it might still be possible to obtain information about it by exploring angular fluctuations at $\sim 500 \mu {\rm m}$, close to the peak of dust emission from the first galaxies.
  • The dynamical impact of Lyman-alpha (Ly{\alpha}) radiation pressure on galaxy formation depends on the rate and duration of momentum transfer between Ly{\alpha} photons and neutral hydrogen gas. Although photon trapping has the potential to multiply the effective force, ionizing radiation from stellar sources may relieve the Ly{\alpha} pressure before appreciably affecting the kinematics of the host galaxy or efficiently coupling Ly{\alpha} photons to the outflow. We present self-consistent Ly{\alpha} radiation-hydrodynamics simulations of high-$z$ galaxy environments by coupling the Cosmic Ly{\alpha} Transfer code (COLT) with spherically symmetric Lagrangian frame hydrodynamics. The accurate but computationally expensive Monte-Carlo radiative transfer calculations are feasible under the one-dimensional approximation. The initial starburst drives an expanding shell of gas from the centre and in certain cases Ly{\alpha} feedback significantly enhances the shell velocity. Radiative feedback alone is capable of ejecting baryons into the intergalactic medium (IGM) for protogalaxies with a virial mass of $M_{\rm vir} \lesssim 10^8~{\rm M}_\odot$. We compare the Ly{\alpha} signatures of Population III stars with $10^5$ K blackbody emission to that of direct collapse black holes with a nonthermal Compton-thick spectrum and find substantial differences if the Ly{\alpha} spectra are shaped by gas pushed by Ly{\alpha} radiation-driven winds. For both sources, the flux emerging from the galaxy is reprocessed by the IGM such that the observed Ly{\alpha} luminosity is reduced significantly and the time-averaged velocity offset of the Ly{\alpha} peak is shifted redward.
  • Extremely metal poor stars have been the focus of much recent attention owing to the expectation that their chemical abundances can shed light on the metal and dust yields of the earliest supernovae. We present our most realistic simulation to date of the astrophysical pathway to the first metal enriched stars. We simulate the radiative and supernova hydrodynamic feedback of a $60\,M_\odot$ Population III star starting from cosmological initial conditions realizing Gaussian density fluctuations. We follow the gravitational hydrodynamics of the supernova remnant at high spatial resolution through its freely-expanding, adiabatic, and radiative phases, until gas, now metal-enriched, has resumed runaway gravitational collapse. Our findings are surprising: while the Population III progenitor exploded with a low energy of $10^{51}\,\text{erg}$ and injected an ample metal mass of $6\,M_\odot$, the first cloud to collapse after the supernova explosion is a dense surviving primordial cloud on which the supernova blastwave deposited metals only superficially, in a thin, unresolved layer. The first metal-enriched stars can form at a very low metallicity, of only $2-5\times10^{-4}\,Z_\odot$, and can inherit the parent cloud's highly elliptical, radially extended orbit in the dark matter gravitational potential.
  • CR7 is the brightest Lyman-$\alpha$ emitter observed at $z>6$, which shows very strong Lyman-$\alpha$ and HeII 1640\AA\ line luminosities, but no metal line emission. Previous studies suggest that CR7 hosts either young primordial stars with a total stellar mass of $\sim 10^7\,\mathrm{M}_\odot$ or a black hole of $\gtrsim 10^6\,\mathrm{M}_\odot$. Here, we explore different formation scenarios for CR7 with a semianalytical model, based on the random sampling of dark matter merger trees. We are unable to reproduce the observational constraints with a primordial stellar source, given our model assumptions, due to the short stellar lifetimes and the early metal enrichment. Black holes that are the remnants of the first stars are either not massive enough, or reside in metal-polluted haloes, ruling out this possible explanation of CR7. Our models instead suggest that direct collapse black holes, which form in metal-free haloes exposed to large Lyman-Werner fluxes, are more likely the origin of CR7. However, this result is derived under optimistic assumptions and future observations are necessary to further constrain the nature of CR7.
  • We simulate the growth of a Population III stellar system, starting from cosmological initial conditions at z=100. We follow the formation of a minihalo and the subsequent collapse of its central gas to high densities, resolving scales as small as ~ 1 AU. Using sink particles to represent the growing protostars, we model the growth of the photodissociating and ionizing region around the first sink, continuing the simulation for ~ 5000 yr after initial protostar formation. Along with the first-forming sink, several tens of secondary sinks form before an ionization front develops around the most massive star. The resulting cluster has high rates of sink formation, ejections from the stellar disc, and sink mergers during the first ~ 2000 yr, before the onset of radiative feedback. By this time a warm ~ 5000 K phase of neutral gas has expanded to roughly the disc radius of 2000 AU, slowing mass flow onto the disc and sinks. By 5000 yr the most massive star grows to 20 M_sol, while the total stellar mass approaches 75 M_sol. Out of the ~ 40 sinks, approximately 30 are low-mass (M_* < 1 M_sol), and if the simulation had resolved smaller scales an even greater number of sinks might have formed. Thus, protostellar radiative feedback is insufficient to prevent rapid disc fragmentation and the formation of a high-member Pop III cluster before an ionization front emerges. Throughout the simulation, the majority of stellar mass is contained within the most massive stars, further implying that the Pop III initial mass function is top-heavy.
  • Gravitational waves (GWs) provide a revolutionary tool to investigate yet unobserved astrophysical objects. Especially the first stars, which are believed to be more massive than present-day stars, might be indirectly observable via the merger of their compact remnants. We develop a self-consistent, cosmologically representative, semi-analytical model to simulate the formation of the first stars. By extrapolating binary stellar-evolution models at 10% solar metallicity to metal-free stars, we track the individual systems until the coalescence of the compact remnants. We estimate the contribution of primordial stars to the merger rate density and to the detection rate of the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (aLIGO). Owing to their higher masses, the remnants of primordial stars produce strong GW signals, even if their contribution in number is relatively small. We find a probability of $\gtrsim1\%$ that the current detection GW150914 is of primordial origin. We estimate that aLIGO will detect roughly 1 primordial BH-BH merger per year for the final design sensitivity, although this rate depends sensitively on the primordial initial mass function (IMF). Turning this around, the detection of black hole mergers with a total binary mass of $\sim 300\,\mathrm{M}_\odot$ would enable us to constrain the primordial IMF.
  • Throughout the epoch of reionization the most luminous Ly{\alpha} emitters are capable of ionizing their own local bubbles. The CR7 galaxy at $z \approx 6.6$ stands out for its combination of exceptionally bright Ly{\alpha} and HeII 1640 Angstrom line emission but absence of metal lines. As a result CR7 may be the first viable candidate host of a young primordial starburst or direct collapse black hole. High-resolution spectroscopy reveals a +160 km s$^{-1}$ velocity offset between the Ly{\alpha} and HeII line peaks while the spatial extent of the Ly{\alpha} emitting region is $\sim 16$ kpc. The observables are indicative of an outflow signature produced by a strong central source. We present one-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamics simulations incorporating accurate Ly{\alpha} feedback and ionizing radiation to investigate the nature of the CR7 source. We find that a Population III star cluster with $10^5$ K blackbody emission ionizes its environment too efficiently to generate a significant velocity offset. However, a massive black hole with a nonthermal Compton-thick spectrum is able to reproduce the Ly{\alpha} signatures as a result of higher photon trapping and longer potential lifetime. For both sources, Ly{\alpha} radiation pressure turns out to be dynamically important.
  • Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are ideal probes of the epoch of the first stars and galaxies. We review the recent theoretical understanding of the formation and evolution of the first (so-called Population III) stars, in light of their viability of providing GRB progenitors. We proceed to discuss possible unique observational signatures of such bursts, based on the current formation scenario of long GRBs. These include signatures related to the prompt emission mechanism, as well as to the afterglow radiation, where the surrounding intergalactic medium might imprint a telltale absorption spectrum. We emphasize important remaining uncertainties in our emerging theoretical framework.