• We consider D-term inflation for small couplings of the inflaton to matter fields. Standard hybrid inflation then ends at a critical value of the inflaton field that exceeds the Planck mass. During the subsequent waterfall transition the inflaton continues its slow-roll motion, whereas the waterfall field rapidly grows by quantum fluctuations. Beyond the decoherence time, the waterfall field becomes classical and approaches a time-dependent minimum, which is determined by the value of the inflaton field and the self-interaction of the waterfall field. During the final stage of inflation, the effective inflaton potential is essentially quadratic, which leads to the standard predictions of chaotic inflation. The model illustrates how the decay of a false vacuum of GUT-scale energy density can end in a period of `chaotic inflation'.
  • Thermal leptogenesis explains the observed matter-antimatter asymmetry of the universe in terms of neutrino masses, consistent with neutrino oscillation experiments. We present a full quantum mechanical calculation of the generated lepton asymmetry based on Kadanoff-Baym equations. Origin of the asymmetry is the departure from equilibrium of the statistical propagator of the heavy Majorana neutrino, together with CP violating couplings. The lepton asymmetry is calculated directly in terms of Green's functions without referring to "number densities". Compared to Boltzmann and quantum Boltzmann equations, the crucial difference are memory effects, rapid oscillations much faster than the heavy neutrino equilibration time. These oscillations strongly suppress the generated lepton asymmetry, unless the standard model gauge interactions, which cause thermal damping, are properly taken into account. We find that these damping effects essentially compensate the enhancement due to quantum statistical factors, so that finally the conventional Boltzmann equations again provide rather accurate predictions for the lepton asymmetry.
  • We point out that in the large field regime, the recently proposed superconformal D-term inflation model coincides with the Starobinsky model. In this regime, the inflaton field dominates over the Planck mass in the gravitational kinetic term in the Jordan frame. Slow-roll inflation is realized in the large field regime for sufficiently large gauge couplings. The Starobinsky model generally emerges as an effective description of slow-roll inflation if a Jordan frame exists where, for large inflaton field values, the action is scale invariant and the ratio \hat {\lambda} of the inflaton self-coupling and the nonminimal coupling to gravity is tiny. The interpretation of this effective coupling is different in different models. In superconformal D-term inflation it is determined by the scale of grand unification, \hat {\lambda} ~ (\Lambda_{GUT}/M_P)^4.
  • We study models of hybrid inflation in the framework of supergravity with superconformal matter. F-term hybrid inflation is not viable since the inflaton acquires a large tachyonic mass. On the contrary, D-term hybrid inflation can successfully account for the amplitude of the primordial power spectrum. It is a two-field inflation model which, depending on parameters, yields values of the scalar spectral index down to n_s ~ 0.96. Generically, there is a tension between a small spectral index and the cosmic string bound albeit, within 2-sigma uncertainty, the current observational bounds can be simultaneously fulfilled.
  • A recently proposed class of supersymmetric models predicts rather light and nearly mass-degenerate higgsinos, while the other superparticles are significantly heavier. In this paper we study the early LHC phenomenology of a benchmark model of this kind. If the squarks and gluinos, and in particular the lighter stop, are still light enough to be within reach, then evidence for our model can be found in hadronic SUSY searches. Moreover, with dedicated searches it will be possible to distinguish the light higgsino model from generic SUSY models with a bino LSP. Search channels with b-jets and with isolated leptons play a crucial role for model discrimination.
  • The origin of the hot phase of the early universe remains so far an unsolved puzzle. A viable option is entropy production through the decays of heavy Majorana neutrinos whose lifetimes determine the initial temperature. We show that baryogenesis and the production of dark matter are natural by-products of this mechanism. As is well known, the cosmological baryon asymmetry can be accounted for by leptogenesis for characteristic neutrino mass parameters. We find that thermal gravitino production then automatically yields the observed amount of dark matter, for the gravitino as the lightest superparticle and typical gluino masses. As an example, we consider the production of heavy Majorana neutrinos in the course of tachyonic preheating associated with spontaneous B-L breaking. A quantitative analysis leads to contraints on the superparticle masses in terms of neutrino masses: For a light neutrino mass of 10^{-5} eV the gravitino mass can be as small as 200 MeV, whereas a lower neutrino mass bound of 0.01 eV implies a lower bound of 9 GeV on the gravitino mass. The measurement of a light neutrino mass of 0.1 eV would rule out heavy neutrino decays as the origin of entropy, visible and dark matter.
  • We study supersymmetric extensions of the Standard Model with small R-parity and lepton number violating couplings which are naturally consistent with primordial nucleosynthesis, thermal leptogenesis and gravitino dark matter. We consider supergravity models where the gravitino is the lightest superparticle followed by a bino-like next-to-lightest superparticle (NLSP). Extending previous work we investigate in detail the sensitivity of LHC experiments to the R-parity breaking parameter zeta for various gluino and squark masses. We perform a simulation of signal and background events for the generic detector DELPHES for which we implement the finite NLSP decay length. We find that for gluino and squark masses accessible at the LHC, values of zeta can be probed which are one to two orders of magnitude smaller than the present upper bound obtained from astrophysics and cosmology.
  • Grand-unified models with extra dimensions at the GUT scale will typically contain exotic states with Standard Model charges and GUT-scale masses. They can act as messengers for gauge-mediated supersymmetry breaking. If the number of messengers is sizeable, soft terms for the visible sector fields will be predominantly generated by gauge mediation, while gravity mediation can induce a small mu parameter. We illustrate this hybrid mediation pattern with two examples, in which the superpartner spectrum contains light and near-degenerate higgsinos with masses below 200 GeV. The typical masses of all other superpartners are much larger, from at least 500 GeV up to several TeV. The lightest superparticle is the gravitino, which may be the dominant component of dark matter.
  • We study tachyonic preheating associated with the spontaneous breaking of B-L, the difference of baryon and lepton number. Reheating occurs through the decays of heavy Majorana neutrinos which are produced during preheating and in decays of the Higgs particles of B-L breaking. Baryogenesis is an interplay of nonthermal and thermal leptogenesis, accompanied by thermally produced gravitino dark matter. The proposed mechanism simultaneously explains the generation of matter and dark matter, thereby relating the absolute neutrino mass scale to the gravitino mass.
  • Thermal leptogenesis explains the observed matter-antimatter asymmetry of the universe in terms of neutrino masses, consistent with neutrino oscillation experiments. We present a full quantum mechanical calculation of the generated lepton asymmetry based on Kadanoff-Baym equations. Origin of the asymmetry is the departure of the statistical propagator of the heavy Majorana neutrino from the equilibrium propagator, together with CP violating couplings. The lepton asymmetry is calculated directly in terms of Green's functions without referring to `number densities'. A detailed comparison with Boltzmann equations shows that conventional leptogenesis calculations have an uncertainty of at least one order of magnitude. Particularly important is the inclusion of thermal damping rates in the full quantum mechanical calculation.
  • We construct a 6D supergravity theory which emerges as intermediate step in the compactification of the heterotic string to the supersymmetric standard model in four dimensions. The theory has N=2 supersymmetry and a gravitational sector with one tensor and two hypermultiplets in addition to the supergravity multiplet. Compactification to four dimensions occurs on a T^2/Z_2 orbifold which has two inequivalent pairs of fixed points with unbroken SU(5) and SU(2)xSU(4) symmetry, respectively. All gauge, gravitational and mixed anomalies are cancelled by the Green-Schwarz mechanism. The model has partial 6D gauge-Higgs unification. Two quark-lepton generations are localized at the SU(5) branes, the third family is composed of split bulk hypermultiplets. The top Yukawa coupling is given by the 6D gauge coupling, all other Yukawa couplings are generated by higher-dimensional operators at the SU(5) branes. The presence of the SU(2)xSU(4) brane breaks SU(5) and generates split gauge and Higgs multiplets with N=1 supersymmetry in four dimensions. The third generation is obtained from two split \bar{5}-plets and two split 10-plets, which together have the quantum numbers of one \bar{5}-plet and one 10-plet. This avoids unsuccessful SU(5) predictions for Yukawa couplings of ordinary 4D SU(5) grand unified theories.
  • We study the implications of thermal leptogenesis for neutrino parameters. Assuming that decays of N_1, the lightest of the heavy Majorana neutrinos, initiate baryogenesis, we show that the final baryon asymmetry is determined by only four parameters: the CP asymmetry epsilon_1, the heavy neutrino mass M_1, the effective light neutrino mass \tilde{m}_1, and the quadratic mean \bar{m} of the light neutrino masses. Imposing the CMB measurement of the baryon asymmetry as constraint on the neutrino parameters, we show, in a model independent way, that quasi-degenerate neutrinos are incompatible with thermal leptogenesis. For maximal CP asymmetry epsilon_1, and neutrino masses in the range from (\Delta m^2_{sol})^{1/2} to (\Delta m^2_{atm})^{1/2}, the baryogenesis temperature is T_B = O(10^{10}) GeV.
  • We evaluate the gravitino production rate in supersymmetric QCD at high temperature to leading order in the gauge coupling. The result, which is obtained by using the resummed gluon propagator, depends logarithmically on the gluon plasma mass. As a byproduct, a new result for the axion production rate in a QED plasma is obtained. The implicatons for the cosmological dark matter problem are briefly discussed, in particular the intriguing possibility that gravitinos are the dominant part of cold dark matter.
  • This is a short introduction to the Standard Model and the underlying concepts of quantum field theory.
  • We investigate how late-time entropy production weakens the Big-Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN) constraints on the gravitino as lightest superparticle with a charged slepton as next-to-lightest superparticle. We find that with a moderate amount of entropy production, the BBN constraints can be eluded for most of the parameter space relevant for the discovery of the gravitino. This is encouraging for experimental tests of supergravity at LHC and ILC.
  • We explore in some detail the hypothesis that the generation of a primordial lepton-antilepton asymmetry (Leptogenesis) early on in the history of the Universe is the root cause for the origin of matter. After explaining the theoretical conditions for producing a matter-antimatter asymmetry in the Universe we detail how, through sphaleron processes, it is possible to transmute a lepton asymmetry -- or, more precisely, a (B-L)-asymmetry -- into a baryon asymmetry. Because Leptogenesis depends in detail on properties of the neutrino spectrum, we review briefly existing experimental information on neutrinos as well as the seesaw mechanism, which offers a theoretical understanding of why neutrinos are so light. The bulk of the review is devoted to a discussion of thermal Leptogenesis and we show that for the neutrino spectrum suggested by oscillation experiments one obtains the observed value for the baryon to photon density ratio in the Universe, independently of any initial boundary conditions. In the latter part of the review we consider how well Leptogenesis fits with particle physics models of dark matter. Although axionic dark matter and Leptogenesis can be very naturally linked, there is a potential clash between Leptogenesis and models of supersymmetric dark matter because the high temperature needed for Leptogenesis leads to an overproduction of gravitinos, which alter the standard predictions of Big Bang Nucleosynthesis. This problem can be resolved, but it constrains the supersymmetric spectrum at low energies and the nature of the lightest supersymmetric particle (LSP). Finally, as an illustration of possible other options for the origin of matter, we discuss the possibility that Leptogenesis may occur as a result of non-thermal processes.
  • LHC/LC Study Group: G. Weiglein, T. Barklow, E. Boos, A. De Roeck, K. Desch, F. Gianotti, R. Godbole, J.F. Gunion, H.E. Haber, S. Heinemeyer, J.L. Hewett, K. Kawagoe, K. Monig, M.M. Nojiri, G. Polesello, F. Richard, S. Riemann, W.J. Stirling, A.G. Akeroyd, B.C. Allanach, D. Asner, S. Asztalos, H. Baer, M. Battaglia, U. Baur, P. Bechtle, G. Belanger, A. Belyaev, E.L. Berger, T. Binoth, G.A. Blair, S. Boogert, F. Boudjema, D. Bourilkov, W. Buchmuller, V. Bunichev, G. Cerminara, M. Chiorboli, H. Davoudiasl, S. Dawson, S. De Curtis, F. Deppisch, M.A. Diaz, M. Dittmar, A. Djouadi, D. Dominici, U. Ellwanger, J.L. Feng, I.F. Ginzburg, A. Giolo-Nicollerat, B.K. Gjelsten, S. Godfrey, D. Grellscheid, J. Gronberg, E. Gross, J. Guasch, K. Hamaguchi, T. Han, J. Hisano, W. Hollik, C. Hugonie, T. Hurth, J. Jiang, A. Juste, J. Kalinowski, W. Kilian, R. Kinnunen, S. Kraml, M. Krawczyk, A. Krokhotine, T. Krupovnickas, R. Lafaye, S. Lehti, H.E. Logan, E. Lytken, V. Martin, H.-U. Martyn, D.J. Miller, S. Moretti, F. Moortgat, G. Moortgat-Pick, M. Muhlleitner, P. Niezurawski, A. Nikitenko, L.H. Orr, P. Osland, A.F. Osorio, H. Pas, T. Plehn, W. Porod, A. Pukhov, F. Quevedo, D. Rainwater, M. Ratz, A. Redelbach, L. Reina, T. Rizzo, R. Ruckl, H.J. Schreiber, M. Schumacher, A. Sherstnev, S. Slabospitsky, J. Sola, A. Sopczak, M. Spira, M. Spiropulu, Z. Sullivan, M. Szleper, T.M.P. Tait, X. Tata, D.R. Tovey, A. Tricomi, M. Velasco, D. Wackeroth, C.E.M. Wagner, S. Weinzierl, P. Wienemann, T. Yanagida, A.F. Zarnecki, D. Zerwas, P.M. Zerwas, L. Zivkovic
    Oct. 27, 2004 hep-ph
    Physics at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and the International e+e- Linear Collider (ILC) will be complementary in many respects, as has been demonstrated at previous generations of hadron and lepton colliders. This report addresses the possible interplay between the LHC and ILC in testing the Standard Model and in discovering and determining the origin of new physics. Mutual benefits for the physics programme at both machines can occur both at the level of a combined interpretation of Hadron Collider and Linear Collider data and at the level of combined analyses of the data, where results obtained at one machine can directly influence the way analyses are carried out at the other machine. Topics under study comprise the physics of weak and strong electroweak symmetry breaking, supersymmetric models, new gauge theories, models with extra dimensions, and electroweak and QCD precision physics. The status of the work that has been carried out within the LHC / LC Study Group so far is summarised in this report. Possible topics for future studies are outlined.
  • We study proton decay in a supersymmetric {\sf SO(10)} gauge theory in six dimensions compactified on an orbifold. The dimension-5 proton decay operators are forbidden by R-symmetry, whereas the dimension-6 operators are enhanced due to the presence of KK towers. Three sequential quark-lepton families are localised at the three orbifold fixed points, where {\sf SO(10)} is broken to its three GUT subgroups. The physical quarks and leptons are mixtures of these brane states and additional bulk zero modes. This leads to a characteristic pattern of branching ratios in proton decay, in particular the suppression of the $p\to \m^+K^0$ mode.
  • Properties of neutrinos may be the origin of the matter-antimatter asymmetry of the universe. In the seesaw model for neutrino masses this leads to important constraints on the properties of light and heavy neutrinos. In particular, an upper bound on the light neutrino masses of 0.1 eV can be derived. We review the present status of thermal leptogenesis with emphasis on the theoretical uncertainties and discuss some implications for lepton and quark mass hierarchies, CP violation and dark matter. We also comment on the `leptogenesis conspiracy', the remarkable fact that neutrino masses may lie in the range where leptogenesis works best.
  • During the process of thermal leptogenesis temperature decreases by about one order of magnitude while the baryon asymmetry is generated. We present an analytical description of this process so that the dependence on the neutrino mass parameters becomes transparent. In the case of maximal CP asymmetry all decay and scattering rates in the plasma are determined by the mass M_1 of the decaying heavy Majorana neutrino, the effective light neutrino mass tilde{m}_1 and the absolute mass scale bar{m} of the light neutrinos. In the mass range suggested by neutrino oscillations, m_{sol} \simeq 8*10^{-3} eV \lesssim \tilde{m}_1 \lesssim m_{atm} \simeq 5*10^{-2} eV, leptogenesis is dominated just by decays and inverse decays. The effect of all other scattering processes lies within the theoretical uncertainty of present calculations. The final baryon asymmetry is dominantly produced at a temperature T_B which can be about one order of magnitude below the heavy neutrino mass M_1. We also derive an analytical expression for the upper bound on the light neutrino masses implied by successful leptogenesis.
  • In higher-dimensional supersymmetric theories gauge couplings of the effective four-dimensional theory are determined by expectation values of scalar fields. We find that at temperatures above a critical temperature $T_*$, which depends on the supersymmetry breaking mass scales, gauge couplings decrease like $T^{-\a}$, $\a > 1$. This has important cosmological consequences. In particular it leads to a relic gravitino density which becomes independent of the reheating temperature for $T_R > T_*$. For small gravitino masses, $m_{3/2} \ll m_{\gl}$, the mass density of stable gravitinos is essentially determined by the gluino mass. The observed value of cold dark matter, $\O_{\rm CDM}h^2 \sim 0.1$, is obtained for gluino masses $m_{\gl} = {\cal O}(1 {\rm TeV})$.
  • We study a supersymmetric SO(10) gauge theory in six dimensions compactified on an orbifold. Three sequential quark-lepton families are localized at the three fixpoints where SO(10) is broken to its three GUT subgroups. Split bulk multiplets yield the Higgs doublets of the standard model and as additional states lepton doublets and down-quark singlets. The physical quarks and leptons are mixtures of brane and bulk states. The model naturally explains small quark mixings together with large lepton mixings in the charged current. A small hierarchy of neutrino masses is obtained due to the different down-quark and up-quark mass hierarchies. None of the usual GUT relations between fermion masses holds exactly.
  • Interactions of heavy Majorana neutrinos in the thermal phase of the early universe may be the origin of the cosmological matter-antimatter asymmetry. This mechanism of baryogenesis implies stringent constraints on light and heavy Majorana neutrino masses. We derive an improved upper bound on the CP asymmetry in heavy neutrino decays which, together with the kinetic equations, yields an upper bound on all light neutrino masses of 0.1 eV. Lepton number changing processes at temperatures above the temperature T_B of baryogenesis can erase other, pre-existing contributions to the baryon asymmetry. We find that these washout processes become very efficient if the effective neutrino mass \tilde{m}_1 is larger than m_* \simeq 10^{-3} eV. All memory of the initial conditions is then erased. Hence, for neutrino masses in the range from (\Delta m^2_sol)^{1/2} \simeq 8*10^{-3} eV to (\Delta m^2_atm)^{1/2} \simeq 5*10^{-2} eV, which is suggested by neutrino oscillations, leptogenesis emerges as the unique source of the cosmological matter-antimatter asymmetry.
  • Properties of neutrinos, the lightest of all elementary particles, may be the origin of the entire matter-antimatter asymmetry of the universe. This requires that neutrinos are Majorana particles, which are equal to their antiparticles, and that their masses are sufficiently small. Leptogenesis, the theory explaining the cosmic matter-antimatter asymmetry, predicts that all neutrino masses are smaller than 0.2 eV, which will be tested by forthcoming laboratory experiments and by cosmology.
  • We study anomalies of six-dimensional gauge theories compactified on orbifolds. In addition to the known bulk anomalies, brane anomalies appear on orbifold fixpoints in the case of chiral boundary conditions. At a fixpoint, where the bulk gauge group G is broken to a subgroup H, the non-abelian G-anomaly in the bulk reduces to a H-anomaly which depends in a simple manner on the chiral boundary conditions. We illustrate this mechanism by means of a SO(10) GUT model.