• Quasars are galaxies hosting accreting supermassive black holes; due to their brightness, they are unique probes of the early universe. To date, only few quasars have been reported at $z > 6.5$ ($<$800 Myr after the Big Bang). In this work, we present six additional $z \gtrsim 6.5$ quasars discovered using the Pan-STARRS1 survey. We use a sample of 15 $z \gtrsim 6.5$ quasars to perform a homogeneous and comprehensive analysis of this highest-redshift quasar population. We report four main results: (1) the majority of $z\gtrsim$6.5 quasars show large blueshifts of the broad CIV 1549\AA$\,$emission line compared to the systemic redshift of the quasars, with a median value $\sim$3$\times$ higher than a quasar sample at $z\sim$1; (2) we estimate the quasars' black hole masses (M$\rm_{BH}\sim$0.3$-$5 $\times$ 10$^{9}$ M$_{\odot}$) via modeling of the MgII 2798\AA$\,$emission line and rest-frame UV continuum; we find that quasars at high redshift accrete their material (with $\langle (L_{\mathrm{bol}}/L_{\mathrm{Edd}}) \rangle = 0.39$) at a rate comparable to a luminosity-matched sample at lower$-$redshift, albeit with significant scatter ($0.4$ dex); (3) we recover no evolution of the FeII/MgII abundance ratio with cosmic time; (4) we derive near zone sizes; together with measurements for $z\sim6$ quasars from recent work, we confirm a shallow evolution of the decreasing quasar near zone sizes with redshift. Finally, we present new millimeter observations of the [CII] 158 $\mu$m emission line and underlying dust continuum from NOEMA for four quasars, and provide new accurate redshifts and [CII]/infrared luminosities estimates. The analysis presented here shows the large range of properties of the most distant quasars.
  • The Pan-Planets survey observed an area of 42 sq deg. in the galactic disk for about 165 hours. The main scientific goal of the project is the detection of transiting planets around M dwarfs. We establish an efficient procedure for determining the stellar parameters $T_{eff}$ and log$g$ of all sources using a method based on SED fitting, utilizing a three-dimensional dust map and proper motion information. In this way we identify more than 60000 M dwarfs, which is by far the largest sample of low-mass stars observed in a transit survey to date. We present several planet candidates around M dwarfs and hotter stars that are currently being followed up. Using Monte-Carlo simulations we calculate the detection efficiency of the Pan-Planets survey for different stellar and planetary populations. We expect to find $3.0^{+3.3}_{-1.6}$ hot Jupiters around F, G, and K dwarfs with periods lower than 10 days based on the planet occurrence rates derived in previous surveys. For M dwarfs, the percentage of stars with a hot Jupiter is under debate. Theoretical models expect a lower occurrence rate than for larger main sequence stars. However, radial velocity surveys find upper limits of about 1\% due to their small sample, while the Kepler survey finds a occurrence rate that we estimate to be at least $0.17(^{+0.67}_{-0.04})$%, making it even higher than the determined fraction from OGLE-III for F, G and K stellar types, $0.14(^{+0.15}_{-0.076})\%$. With the large sample size of Pan-Planets, we are able to determine an occurrence rate of $0.11(^{+0.37}_{-0.02})$% in case one of our candidates turns out to be a real detection. If, however, none of our candidates turn out to be true planets, we are able to put an upper limit of 0.34% with a 95% confidence on the hot Jupiter occurrence rate of M dwarfs. Therefore we cannot yet confirm the theoretical prediction of a lower occurrence rate for cool stars.
  • We have analyzed long-term wind speed time-series from five field sites up to a height of 300 m from the ground. Structure function-based scaling analysis has revealed that the scaling exponents in the mesoscale regime systematically depend on height. This anomalous behavior is likely caused by the buoyancy effects. In the framework of the extended self-similarity, the relative scaling exponents portray quasi-universal behavior.
  • We present the results of an analysis of Pan-STARRS1 Medium Deep Survey multi-band (g,r,i,z,y) images of a sample of 698 low-redshift disk galaxies that span broad ranges in stellar mass, star-formation rate, and bulge/disk ratio. We use population synthesis SED fitting techniques to explore the radial distribution of the light, color, surface mass density, mass/light ratio, and age of the stellar populations. We characterize the structure and stellar content of the galaxy disks out to radii of about twice Petrosian r90, beyond which the halo light becomes significant. We measure normalized radial profiles for sub-samples of galaxies in three bins each of stellar mass and concentration. We also fit radial profiles to each galaxy. The majority of galaxies have down-bending radial surface brightness profiles in the bluer bands with a break radius at roughly r90. However, they typically show single unbroken exponentials in the reddest bands and in the stellar surface mass density. We find that the mass/light ratio and stellar age radial profiles have a characteristic "U-shape". There is a good correlation between the amplitude of the down-bend in the surface brightness profile and the rate of the increase in the M/L ratio in the outer disk. As we move from late- to early-type galaxies, the amplitude of the down-bend and the radial gradient in M/L both decrease. Our results imply a combination of stellar radial migration and suppression of recent star formation can account for the stellar populations of the outer disk.
  • The goal of this work is to conduct a photometric study of eclipsing binaries in M31. We apply a modified box-fitting algorithm to search for eclipsing binary candidates and determine their period. We classify these candidates into detached, semi-detached, and contact systems using the Fourier decomposition method. We cross-match the position of our detached candidates with the photometry from Local Group Survey (Massey et al. 2006) and select 13 candidates brighter than 20.5 magnitude in V. The relative physical parameters of these detached candidates are further characterized with Detached Eclipsing Binary Light curve fitter (DEBiL) by Devor (2005). We will followup the detached eclipsing binaries spectroscopically and determine the distance to M31.
  • We perform a study on the optical and infrared photometric properties of known luminous blue variables (LBVs) in M31 using the sample of LBV candidates from the Local Group Galaxy Survey (Massey et al. 2007). We find that M31 LBV candidates show photometric variability ranging from 0.375 to 1.576 magnitudes in rP1 during a three year time-span observed by the Pan-STARRS 1 Andromeda survey (PAndromeda). Their near-infrared colors also follow the distribution of Galactic LBVs as shown by Oksala et al. (2013). We use these features as selection criteria to search for unknown LBV candidates in M31. We thus devise a method to search for candidate LBVs using both optical color from the Local Group Galaxy Survey and infrared color from Two Micron All Sky Survey, as well as photometric variations observed by PAndromeda. We find four sources exhibiting common properties of known LBVs. These sources also exhibit UV emission as seen from GALEX, which is one of the previously adopted method to search for LBV candidates. The locations of the LBVs are well aligned withM31 spiral arms as seen in the UV light, suggesting they are evolved stars at young age given their high-mass nature. We compare these candidates with the latest Geneva evolutionary tracks, which show that our new M31 LBV candidates are massive evolved stars with an age of 10 to 100 million years.